Does being on journal really matter?

(Study Tips, Dealing With Stress, Maintaining a Social Life, Financial Aid, Internships, Bar Exam, Careers in Law . . . )
stressed2010
Posts: 36
Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2010 4:38 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby stressed2010 » Sat Sep 04, 2010 6:55 pm

Thanks for your response Operasoprano. would you say that people with stats near the part time medians still have a shot or does one need to be closer to the full time stats to get in?

User avatar
OperaSoprano
Posts: 4410
Joined: Tue Nov 25, 2008 1:54 am

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby OperaSoprano » Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:20 pm

stressed2010 wrote:Thanks for your response Operasoprano. would you say that people with stats near the part time medians still have a shot or does one need to be closer to the full time stats to get in?


Numbers are going up. You are more likely now to be WL'd or dinged if you aren't close to FT stats, unless you have some sort of hook (unusual or prestigious WE, generally speaking.) Due to class size, your odds of admission go up if you do what I didn't want to do (IE: retake) and apply to day, unless you truly want to be an evening student.

Miniver
Posts: 119
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 2:13 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby Miniver » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:05 am

...
Last edited by Miniver on Sat Dec 11, 2010 1:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

reverendt
Posts: 499
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:56 am

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby reverendt » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:19 am

Journals matter because most of them present you with a chance to get published.
That is always a plus on a resume.

User avatar
johnnyutah
Posts: 1709
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2010 6:00 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby johnnyutah » Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:23 pm

reverendt wrote:Journals matter because most of them present you with a chance to get published.

Journals do matter, but this is not why. If you want to get published, you can simply write an article on your own.

ScaredWorkedBored
Posts: 409
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:39 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby ScaredWorkedBored » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:18 pm

Journals do matter, but this is not why. If you want to get published, you can simply write an article on your own.


You can run a write-in campaign for political office, so why bother getting a major party nomination? That's more or less your reasoning.

99.9% of what law students get published is their journal project.

User avatar
nealric
Posts: 2395
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 9:53 am

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby nealric » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:22 pm

I really enjoyed my time on journal. My journal's topic ended up being what I wanted to practice, so it was nice getting familiar with cutting edge issues in the topic. Also, I think it legitimately helped my writing skills (I was eventually an executive editor doing substantive editing). It was also a nice way to become part of a community. The work load wasn't bad at all except for a couple bad articles. Plus, my journal had free beer in the office :D

User avatar
johnnyutah
Posts: 1709
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2010 6:00 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby johnnyutah » Mon Sep 06, 2010 2:46 pm

ScaredWorkedBored wrote:
Journals do matter, but this is not why. If you want to get published, you can simply write an article on your own.

You can run a write-in campaign for political office, so why bother getting a major party nomination? That's more or less your reasoning.

99.9% of what law students get published is their journal project.

I don't think being on a journal makes it much easier to get published. A high percentage of law student publications may come through journal membership, but I think this relationship is correlative rather than causative (i.e., the kinds of people who want to publish are also the kinds of people who want to be on a journal).

Anonymous Loser
Posts: 568
Joined: Fri Sep 11, 2009 11:17 am

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby Anonymous Loser » Mon Sep 06, 2010 3:00 pm

johnnyutah wrote:
ScaredWorkedBored wrote:
Journals do matter, but this is not why. If you want to get published, you can simply write an article on your own.

You can run a write-in campaign for political office, so why bother getting a major party nomination? That's more or less your reasoning.

99.9% of what law students get published is their journal project.

I don't think being on a journal makes it much easier to get published. A high percentage of law student publications may come through journal membership, but I think this relationship is correlative rather than causative (i.e., the kinds of people who want to publish are also the kinds of people who want to be on a journal).


Many (perhaps most) journals will not accept student submissions from non-members.

User avatar
Adjudicator
Posts: 1108
Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 4:18 am

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby Adjudicator » Mon Sep 06, 2010 3:10 pm

johnnyutah wrote:I don't think being on a journal makes it much easier to get published. A high percentage of law student publications may come through journal membership, but I think this relationship is correlative rather than causative (i.e., the kinds of people who want to publish are also the kinds of people who want to be on a journal).


Which of the following, if true, most weakens the argument?

A)
Many (perhaps most) journals will not accept student submissions from non-members.

ScaredWorkedBored
Posts: 409
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:39 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby ScaredWorkedBored » Mon Sep 06, 2010 4:49 pm

johnnyutah wrote:
ScaredWorkedBored wrote:
Journals do matter, but this is not why. If you want to get published, you can simply write an article on your own.

You can run a write-in campaign for political office, so why bother getting a major party nomination? That's more or less your reasoning.

99.9% of what law students get published is their journal project.


I don't think being on a journal makes it much easier to get published. A high percentage of law student publications may come through journal membership, but I think this relationship is correlative rather than causative (i.e., the kinds of people who want to publish are also the kinds of people who want to be on a journal).


You don't seem to understand how the process works. Journals will ordinarily pick 6-8 student pieces for publication from their 2L members. These are the "notes" and "comments." This is ordinarily the only way for you to get published in one of your school's journals as a student. Of the journals at my school, only one of the journals even allowed non-member students to submit. To my knowledge, no one ever got published that way.

If you're not getting published in your own school, it's extremely difficult unless you are co-writing with a professor to get published in another school's journal. The reason this is ordinarily considered a mark of COA clerks & future academics is that it's rare. While I'm sure no actual compiled numbers exist, there would also have to be a strong overlap between people who are on a home journal and publishing elsewhere. No other course in law school actually teaches you how to write a journal article, let alone does draft review & feedback. Doing all of this yourself would be easily as massive a time commitment as a journal, and you still are fighting an uphill battle to get published because a lot of journals take the "professional author" category reasonably seriously.

User avatar
worldtraveler
Posts: 7669
Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 4:47 am

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby worldtraveler » Tue Sep 07, 2010 5:14 pm

ScaredWorkedBored wrote:
johnnyutah wrote:
ScaredWorkedBored wrote:
Journals do matter, but this is not why. If you want to get published, you can simply write an article on your own.

You can run a write-in campaign for political office, so why bother getting a major party nomination? That's more or less your reasoning.

99.9% of what law students get published is their journal project.


I don't think being on a journal makes it much easier to get published. A high percentage of law student publications may come through journal membership, but I think this relationship is correlative rather than causative (i.e., the kinds of people who want to publish are also the kinds of people who want to be on a journal).


You don't seem to understand how the process works. Journals will ordinarily pick 6-8 student pieces for publication from their 2L members. These are the "notes" and "comments." This is ordinarily the only way for you to get published in one of your school's journals as a student. Of the journals at my school, only one of the journals even allowed non-member students to submit. To my knowledge, no one ever got published that way.

If you're not getting published in your own school, it's extremely difficult unless you are co-writing with a professor to get published in another school's journal. The reason this is ordinarily considered a mark of COA clerks & future academics is that it's rare. While I'm sure no actual compiled numbers exist, there would also have to be a strong overlap between people who are on a home journal and publishing elsewhere. No other course in law school actually teaches you how to write a journal article, let alone does draft review & feedback. Doing all of this yourself would be easily as massive a time commitment as a journal, and you still are fighting an uphill battle to get published because a lot of journals take the "professional author" category reasonably seriously.


This is different depending on which school you attend. Shocking, I know.

User avatar
johnnyutah
Posts: 1709
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2010 6:00 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby johnnyutah » Tue Sep 07, 2010 5:18 pm

ScaredWorkedBored wrote:You don't seem to understand how the process works. Journals will ordinarily pick 6-8 student pieces for publication from their 2L members. These are the "notes" and "comments." This is ordinarily the only way for you to get published in one of your school's journals as a student. Of the journals at my school, only one of the journals even allowed non-member students to submit. To my knowledge, no one ever got published that way.

If you're not getting published in your own school, it's extremely difficult unless you are co-writing with a professor to get published in another school's journal. The reason this is ordinarily considered a mark of COA clerks & future academics is that it's rare. While I'm sure no actual compiled numbers exist, there would also have to be a strong overlap between people who are on a home journal and publishing elsewhere. No other course in law school actually teaches you how to write a journal article, let alone does draft review & feedback. Doing all of this yourself would be easily as massive a time commitment as a journal, and you still are fighting an uphill battle to get published because a lot of journals take the "professional author" category reasonably seriously.

You know how many journals there are? You can shit out an article in a week and probably get it published somewhere. It might not be somewhere prestigious or notable, but it's still getting published.

ScaredWorkedBored
Posts: 409
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:39 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby ScaredWorkedBored » Tue Sep 07, 2010 5:42 pm

johnnyutah wrote:
ScaredWorkedBored wrote:You don't seem to understand how the process works. Journals will ordinarily pick 6-8 student pieces for publication from their 2L members. These are the "notes" and "comments." This is ordinarily the only way for you to get published in one of your school's journals as a student. Of the journals at my school, only one of the journals even allowed non-member students to submit. To my knowledge, no one ever got published that way.

If you're not getting published in your own school, it's extremely difficult unless you are co-writing with a professor to get published in another school's journal. The reason this is ordinarily considered a mark of COA clerks & future academics is that it's rare. While I'm sure no actual compiled numbers exist, there would also have to be a strong overlap between people who are on a home journal and publishing elsewhere. No other course in law school actually teaches you how to write a journal article, let alone does draft review & feedback. Doing all of this yourself would be easily as massive a time commitment as a journal, and you still are fighting an uphill battle to get published because a lot of journals take the "professional author" category reasonably seriously.

You know how many journals there are? You can shit out an article in a week and probably get it published somewhere. It might not be somewhere prestigious or notable, but it's still getting published.


Look, you want to keep talking yourself into "I didn't really make a big mistake by skipping a journal, they're all a bunch of morons doing boring work," and remain divorced from reality, go ahead. I'm not wasting time with this "I believe X regardless of facts because X better be true for me" crap. You hate journals, we get it. That doesn't make what you are saying remotely intelligent.

User avatar
ResolutePear
Posts: 8614
Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2010 10:07 pm

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby ResolutePear » Tue Sep 07, 2010 6:01 pm

ScaredWorkedBored wrote:
johnnyutah wrote:
ScaredWorkedBored wrote:You don't seem to understand how the process works. Journals will ordinarily pick 6-8 student pieces for publication from their 2L members. These are the "notes" and "comments." This is ordinarily the only way for you to get published in one of your school's journals as a student. Of the journals at my school, only one of the journals even allowed non-member students to submit. To my knowledge, no one ever got published that way.

If you're not getting published in your own school, it's extremely difficult unless you are co-writing with a professor to get published in another school's journal. The reason this is ordinarily considered a mark of COA clerks & future academics is that it's rare. While I'm sure no actual compiled numbers exist, there would also have to be a strong overlap between people who are on a home journal and publishing elsewhere. No other course in law school actually teaches you how to write a journal article, let alone does draft review & feedback. Doing all of this yourself would be easily as massive a time commitment as a journal, and you still are fighting an uphill battle to get published because a lot of journals take the "professional author" category reasonably seriously.

You know how many journals there are? You can shit out an article in a week and probably get it published somewhere. It might not be somewhere prestigious or notable, but it's still getting published.


Look, you want to keep talking yourself into "I didn't really make a big mistake by skipping a journal, they're all a bunch of morons doing boring work," and remain divorced from reality, go ahead. I'm not wasting time with this "I believe X regardless of facts because X better be true for me" crap. You hate journals, we get it. That doesn't make what you are saying remotely intelligent.


Going to concur. If you have a chance at a journal or law review spot, it's going to pay off in the future.

Although I will question: Do your peers and faculty support you in writing articles for other journals while skipping on their journals? I think not.

Besides, I thought you had to be somebody with a JD(i.e. professor) to get published outside of the 'Notes'.

Renzo
Posts: 4265
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 3:23 am

Re: Does being on journal really matter?

Postby Renzo » Tue Sep 07, 2010 10:14 pm

johnnyutah wrote:You know how many journals there are? You can shit out an article in a week and probably get it published somewhere. It might not be somewhere prestigious or notable, but it's still getting published.

Do you know how many shit articles are floating around, looking (unsuccessfully) for someone, anyone, to publish them? It would blow your mind.




Return to “Forum for Law School Students”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot], jolin0922, LawHammer, rockosmodernlife and 10 guests