NEW or USED books?

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traehekat
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby traehekat » Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:51 pm

romothesavior wrote:2Ls and 3Ls, it may be useful to know:

-How much you spent
-If you bought used or new
-What you bought besides casebooks
-Where you bought them

I (and I'm sure others) would find it very helpful to know what we're looking at spending for this fall.


All I can say is http://www.lawbooksforless.com doesn't exactly live up to its name.

rando
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby rando » Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:59 pm

romothesavior wrote:2Ls and 3Ls, it may be useful to know:

-How much you spent
-If you bought used or new
-What you bought besides casebooks
-Where you bought them

I (and I'm sure others) would find it very helpful to know what we're looking at spending for this fall.


Every semester I buy the casebook and one supplement (Emmanuels or E&E) for each lecture course I'm taking.

I have never bought new.

I bought off Amazon or Half.com.

Have spent as much as $400 first semester (5 lecture courses and bought useless crap like Black's Law Dictionary).
Every other semester I have spent between $150 & 250.

I have also re-sold about 1/2 my books each semester for $50-100 (through amazon or half.com)

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romothesavior
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby romothesavior » Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:01 pm

Wow Rando, that seems really, really cheap. WUSTL estimated $2,000 for our books for the year. I'm guessing it is safe to say that a shrewd buyer can come in way under?

rando
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby rando » Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:10 pm

romothesavior wrote:Wow Rando, that seems really, really cheap. WUSTL estimated $2,000 for our books for the year. I'm guessing it is safe to say that a shrewd buyer can come in way under?


Waaaay under. I think Wustl's estimate is about right. Maybe a bit high. But many of my classmates estimate 750-1000/semester if they buy all the required materials and a reasonable number of supplements. At least for 1L year.

2L/3L will be less because you may be doing clinics, field placements, seminars etc. which don't have $150 books.

Buying used will generally be about 1/3 the price of new. At least that's how it has been for me. You can go really low if you buy crappy used books.

270910
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby 270910 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:13 pm

romothesavior wrote:2Ls and 3Ls, it may be useful to know:

-How much you spent
-If you bought used or new
-What you bought besides casebooks
-Where you bought them

I (and I'm sure others) would find it very helpful to know what we're looking at spending for this fall.


~$600-700 for a full round of casebooks new from the bookstore is what you should expect. Anything you do to cut costs (buy used (many schools have used book drives, ebay, etc.), buy new for cheaper online, etc.) will cost you time and effort. Obviously some things are better tradeoffs than others.

Personally, I REALLY obliterate a case when I read it with annotations before and during class, etc. - so I liked to buy new books. It's expensive - but yeah, so is law school.

A single supplement will run you from 30 to 100 new. Those can be had in the library, used, cheaper online, etc. as well.

sibley
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby sibley » Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:13 pm


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happy187
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby happy187 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 3:29 pm

all new books via amazon with 2 day shipping = 534
all new books via bookstore = 698

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romothesavior
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby romothesavior » Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:33 pm

happy187 wrote:all new books via amazon with 2 day shipping = 534
all new books via bookstore = 698


Nice. Now I'll have plenty of extra money for wineing and dining.

I'm thinking I may go with new textbooks and used EEs.

sibley
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby sibley » Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:38 pm

romothesavior wrote:
happy187 wrote:all new books via amazon with 2 day shipping = 534
all new books via bookstore = 698


Nice. Now I'll have plenty of extra money for wineing and dining.

I'm thinking I may go with new textbooks and used EEs.


What's EEs? Wish my school would tell me my profs/section/etc so I can buy now.

270910
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby 270910 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:38 pm

romothesavior wrote:
happy187 wrote:all new books via amazon with 2 day shipping = 534
all new books via bookstore = 698


Nice. Now I'll have plenty of extra money for wineing and dining.

I'm thinking I may go with new textbooks and used EEs.


Pro tip: Wait for a month on E&Es. There's a good chance one or more will be worse than other supplements for your class, and you can pick up tips from upper classmen and check stuff out in the library before putting any money down. One supplement that matches your class well is worth its weight in gold, 10 that don't will just drag you down and tire you out.

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OGR3
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby OGR3 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:46 pm

I use half.com. So far I've bought 2 books for fall, both at around 25% of the new price. One has absolutely no markings, the other has some highlighting (which was disclosed when I purchased it). For some books, I'll just get them at the campus bookstore because the half.com discount is minimal and I can just thumb through each book to find the fewest markups.

In my opinion, buying new is always a ripoff.

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happy187
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby happy187 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:51 pm

i've heard good things about half.com also textbooks.com has good prices.

RP1983
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby RP1983 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 5:09 pm

traehekat wrote:Just sayin', the money saved from not buying new books COULD buy...

Image

or...

Image

or...

Image

Just a thought.


You failed to include.....

--ImageRemoved--

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20160810
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby 20160810 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 6:09 pm

Used all the way IMHO.

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skoobily doobily
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby skoobily doobily » Mon Aug 02, 2010 6:59 pm

It's seems that a large majority of people on this site quit case briefing completely 3 or 4 weeks in. Would it be too bold a move to not even buy the casebook, and simply used canned briefs to refer to in class?

other question: i've already bought supplements for my 3 substantive classes, E&E's for torts and Civ Pro, and Chirelstein's contracts. I know different books are going to work for different professors, but these seemed to be regarded as the most universally helpful books, as "safe picks". Was it a bad idea to do this before classes started?

270910
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby 270910 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 7:38 pm

skoobily doobily wrote:It's seems that a large majority of people on this site quit case briefing completely 3 or 4 weeks in. Would it be too bold a move to not even buy the casebook, and simply used canned briefs to refer to in class?

other question: i've already bought supplements for my 3 substantive classes, E&E's for torts and Civ Pro, and Chirelstein's contracts. I know different books are going to work for different professors, but these seemed to be regarded as the most universally helpful books, as "safe picks". Was it a bad idea to do this before classes started?


Whether or not somebody breifs a case has nothing to do with whether or not it's worth your time to read the case. Read the damn cases, at least first semester.

sibley
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby sibley » Mon Aug 02, 2010 7:44 pm

disco_barred wrote:
skoobily doobily wrote:It's seems that a large majority of people on this site quit case briefing completely 3 or 4 weeks in. Would it be too bold a move to not even buy the casebook, and simply used canned briefs to refer to in class?

other question: i've already bought supplements for my 3 substantive classes, E&E's for torts and Civ Pro, and Chirelstein's contracts. I know different books are going to work for different professors, but these seemed to be regarded as the most universally helpful books, as "safe picks". Was it a bad idea to do this before classes started?


Whether or not somebody breifs a case has nothing to do with whether or not it's worth your time to read the case. Read the damn cases, at least first semester.


I highly recommend reading them. I only took one legal class and it was in undergrad (it was meant to be taught like a first year law class, by the old dean of wash u law, so it has at least a little credibility) and I found I did much better than my classmates who didn't toil over their cases and instead read the briefs. I caught a lot more and seemed to understand a lot more than they did. It could be that I'm just brilliant like that, but I think reading the cases is the more likely reason.

Burger in a can
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby Burger in a can » Mon Aug 02, 2010 7:52 pm

FWIW, I ordered all of my books from half.com for a total of about $225, and they are all in nearly perfect condition. Like maybe 4 pages with highlighter marks, and the covers/binding aren't totally pristine. If you take the time to pick through the choices on half.com, it's totally worth it imho.

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skoobily doobily
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby skoobily doobily » Mon Aug 02, 2010 8:33 pm

disco_barred wrote:
skoobily doobily wrote:It's seems that a large majority of people on this site quit case briefing completely 3 or 4 weeks in. Would it be too bold a move to not even buy the casebook, and simply used canned briefs to refer to in class?

other question: i've already bought supplements for my 3 substantive classes, E&E's for torts and Civ Pro, and Chirelstein's contracts. I know different books are going to work for different professors, but these seemed to be regarded as the most universally helpful books, as "safe picks". Was it a bad idea to do this before classes started?


Whether or not somebody breifs a case has nothing to do with whether or not it's worth your time to read the case. Read the damn cases, at least first semester.


Perhaps you could be a little bit more helpful. If every student says that it is a waste of time to brief cases then, yes, it does have something to do with whether or not it's worth my time to read/brief the case.

Very few people seem to think it worthwhile to keep up briefing the entire semester. If the "end goal" of everything we do should be to prepare for the exams, are case briefings really going to help for exam prep? Or is there some value to be taken away from simply reading the cases that people aren't mentioning?

If there isn't, and case briefing does turn out to actually be a huge time sink, then what would be the point of spending 600$ on books that i'm not going to use.

I'm not trying to win an internet battle or anything, i'm hunting down information because I don't have any except what TLS gives me. You're obviously someone who has advice to give, so perhaps you could help me figure out where i'm going wrong instead of giving me a dismissive answer.


sibley wrote:
I highly recommend reading them. I only took one legal class and it was in undergrad (it was meant to be taught like a first year law class, by the old dean of wash u law, so it has at least a little credibility) and I found I did much better than my classmates who didn't toil over their cases and instead read the briefs. I caught a lot more and seemed to understand a lot more than they did. It could be that I'm just brilliant like that, but I think reading the cases is the more likely reason.


Thanks for your input, but i'm looking for specifically for advice from those in LS already.

270910
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby 270910 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 8:51 pm

skoobily doobily wrote:
disco_barred wrote:
skoobily doobily wrote:It's seems that a large majority of people on this site quit case briefing completely 3 or 4 weeks in. Would it be too bold a move to not even buy the casebook, and simply used canned briefs to refer to in class?

other question: i've already bought supplements for my 3 substantive classes, E&E's for torts and Civ Pro, and Chirelstein's contracts. I know different books are going to work for different professors, but these seemed to be regarded as the most universally helpful books, as "safe picks". Was it a bad idea to do this before classes started?


Whether or not somebody breifs a case has nothing to do with whether or not it's worth your time to read the case. Read the damn cases, at least first semester.


Perhaps you could be a little bit more helpful. If every student says that it is a waste of time to brief cases then, yes, it does have something to do with whether or not it's worth my time to read/brief the case.

Very few people seem to think it worthwhile to keep up briefing the entire semester. If the "end goal" of everything we do should be to prepare for the exams, are case briefings really going to help for exam prep? Or is there some value to be taken away from simply reading the cases that people aren't mentioning?

If there isn't, and case briefing does turn out to actually be a huge time sink, then what would be the point of spending 600$ on books that i'm not going to use.

I'm not trying to win an internet battle or anything, i'm hunting down information because I don't have any except what TLS gives me. You're obviously someone who has advice to give, so perhaps you could help me figure out where i'm going wrong instead of giving me a dismissive answer.


sibley wrote:
I highly recommend reading them. I only took one legal class and it was in undergrad (it was meant to be taught like a first year law class, by the old dean of wash u law, so it has at least a little credibility) and I found I did much better than my classmates who didn't toil over their cases and instead read the briefs. I caught a lot more and seemed to understand a lot more than they did. It could be that I'm just brilliant like that, but I think reading the cases is the more likely reason.


Thanks for your input, but i'm looking for specifically for advice from those in LS already.


I think you might not understand the term.

Reading a case is what happens when you put your eyes on each word (more or less) one at a time and attempt to understand what they mean.

Briefing a case is what happens when you write out a summary of what you have just read after reading the case.

So just because people often recommend not briefing cases doesn't mean they also advocate not reading cases. Some advocate not reading cases, but that is extremely inadvisable when you're still learning the case method and getting used to law school in general.

sibley
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby sibley » Mon Aug 02, 2010 8:54 pm

skoobily doobily wrote:
disco_barred wrote:
skoobily doobily wrote:It's seems that a large majority of people on this site quit case briefing completely 3 or 4 weeks in. Would it be too bold a move to not even buy the casebook, and simply used canned briefs to refer to in class?

other question: i've already bought supplements for my 3 substantive classes, E&E's for torts and Civ Pro, and Chirelstein's contracts. I know different books are going to work for different professors, but these seemed to be regarded as the most universally helpful books, as "safe picks". Was it a bad idea to do this before classes started?


Whether or not somebody breifs a case has nothing to do with whether or not it's worth your time to read the case. Read the damn cases, at least first semester.


Perhaps you could be a little bit more helpful. If every student says that it is a waste of time to brief cases then, yes, it does have something to do with whether or not it's worth my time to read/brief the case.

Very few people seem to think it worthwhile to keep up briefing the entire semester. If the "end goal" of everything we do should be to prepare for the exams, are case briefings really going to help for exam prep? Or is there some value to be taken away from simply reading the cases that people aren't mentioning?

If there isn't, and case briefing does turn out to actually be a huge time sink, then what would be the point of spending 600$ on books that i'm not going to use.

I'm not trying to win an internet battle or anything, i'm hunting down information because I don't have any except what TLS gives me. You're obviously someone who has advice to give, so perhaps you could help me figure out where i'm going wrong instead of giving me a dismissive answer.


sibley wrote:
I highly recommend reading them. I only took one legal class and it was in undergrad (it was meant to be taught like a first year law class, by the old dean of wash u law, so it has at least a little credibility) and I found I did much better than my classmates who didn't toil over their cases and instead read the briefs. I caught a lot more and seemed to understand a lot more than they did. It could be that I'm just brilliant like that, but I think reading the cases is the more likely reason.


Thanks for your input, but i'm looking for specifically for advice from those in LS already.


Sounds like you just want someone to tell you it's ok not to do the work. And since when is the goal of law school acing the exams? Of course that's important but how do you expect to do well in the real world? Are you going to have your interns analyze everything for you?

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skoobily doobily
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby skoobily doobily » Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:08 pm

sibley wrote:Sounds like you just want someone to tell you it's ok not to do the work.

Um, no. I'd just like to avoid inefficiencies if I can spot them ahead of time. As disco stated, skipping reading cases is not one of those instances.

sibley wrote:And since when is the goal of law school acing the exams?

Since job prospects became partially a function of GPA

sibley wrote:Of course that's important but how do you expect to do well in the real world? Are you going to have your interns analyze everything for you?

I'm not sure I understand you.


Also: thanks disco

findlayswimmer28
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby findlayswimmer28 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:17 pm

I buy all the books that I can from half.com; gently used whenever possible. The key is to look sooner rather than later.

Also, be weary of the 2L or 3L that is willing to let you have/use their books. While free definitely helps the pocketbook, it also can mean the book is in bad shape. I had a 3L give me their property book (a very nice gesture), but it was so badly marked up that I almost went out and bought a new one. There is nothing more aggravating than using a book that has been highlighted in not only it's entirety, but magenta sharpie to boot.

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romothesavior
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby romothesavior » Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:29 pm

Skoobily, learning to think like a lawyer includes being able to read a case to identify and understand important information. Even if it isn't all that helpful as a student, I think learning to do this basic function of a lawyer is an important skill to learn as a 1L.

270910
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Re: NEW or USED books?

Postby 270910 » Mon Aug 02, 2010 9:31 pm

romothesavior wrote:Skoobily, learning to think like a lawyer includes being able to read a case to identify and understand important information. Even if it isn't all that helpful as a student, I think learning to do this basic function of a lawyer is an important skill to learn as a 1L.


Also true.

Reading cases will also clue you in on a lot of reasoning skills that having the info fed to you won't. Skipping the cases just poses too much risk to be acceptable until late fall semester at the absolute soonest, and probably not until much later.




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