Closing Thoughts

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby 98234872348 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:13 am

Cleareyes wrote:I think it's great that you're giving your advice and I wouldn't say there's anyone it's not applicable to as at least one perspective. I just objected slightly to your advocating against pre-school prep without fully fleshing out your perspective, that's all. I think that your advice about not focusing on learning aspects of the law the prof hasn't mentioned is a really good and important point, but I think it applies more strongly to what you do during the semester than before it begins.

Yeah, obviously my advice is a bit nuanced in the sense that I'm drawing off of my experience from all of 1L and not just my experience from prepping in the summer. But yeah, I was presenting the argument, I am actually typically arguing on the other side of the equation, in the sense that I typically defend LIGHT prep. Not comprehensive prep, though. And I didn't read to LEARN the law. I read to introduce myself to it. I really do think one would be more prone to burn out if one underwent a comprehensive prep schedule, (i.e. outlining, attempting to learn the law, studying rigorously, etc.). The other thing, really, is that it's completely unnecessary. You can succeed in law school without prepping. So it's not really the best utilization of time over the last summer you're not going to be inundated with write on competitions and a full time job (for those of us lucky enough to land summer gigs, that is). God forbid I didn't get on law review, I'd be writing an appellate brief right now for moot court and attempting to balance that with write-on competitions for secondary journals. Not to mention if I decide to transfer I'm going to have to do that anyways. Spend your summer drinking coronas on the beach, not sitting inside studying. If you want to do a bit of prep, take an E&E to the beach and skim it. But don't try to learn the law, because I would bet that doing so will interfere with your understanding of the law later, not to mention make you more prone to burn out.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby 270910 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:01 am

*ears prick up*

0L... considering prep...

I wrote this once and think it really cuts to the heart of it:

disco_barred wrote:
adh07d wrote:This thread went exactly the way I figured it would. Maybe some of us are sadistic and want to read through the E&E's for pleasure? Why not just humor us gunners an answer instead of repeating something the OP has heard a thousand times. If it turns out to be a waste of time and even hurtful to our 1L then that's our mistake to be made and we've gotten fair warning, so why not play along and maybe try and answer what the OP was asking.


The problem with TLS is that a lot of anxious, excited, competitive 0Ls want to get an edge before getting to law school. That is completely understandable. They want to hear that prep can help, they want to hear how to do it, they want to spend time, effort, and money on it. So when they ask, and 9 successful law students say 'massive waste' and 1 successful law student gives his or her blessing, they just take that info and run with it. TLS law students forum turns into a flock of eager 0Ls looking for a 1L yes-man.

It frustrates us, as I'm sure every older generation has felt frustrated when younger generations ignored their advice. But I guess sometimes you have to learn by doing instead of being told.

At the very least, any OTHER 0Ls out there lurking: You have absolute nothing to fear from those doing 0L prep, nor the people who lock themselves in the library until midnight every night once school starts. You have nothing to fear from the people whose hornbooks spill from their arms when they sit down for the first classes, you have nothing to fear from the person whose casebook is tabbed and full read by four weeks into the semester. You have nothing to fear from the guy whose outlines are updated every week.

Why? Because no one crazy study strategy is necessary. You've got to know the law and write a mean exam, and you can get there with much less effort and panic than you'll see those around you doing. Not only that, but that panic and over-eager approach will often result in epic burnout: people who put in three times the effort and get middling grades anyway. Because ONLY one thing matters, and it often gets neglected, because learning and practicing exam skills is more abstract, unguided, and difficult than just reading a dozen hornbooks and outling until your fingers ache.

Law school is scary, uncertain, and competitive. There ARE things you can do to get an advantage. They tend to be subtle, they tend to not require herculean effort.

You need to approach law school intelligently. And it's so, so hard to do it because the guidance your given is minimal and the tension is enormous. Everyone watches everyone else. Everyone is nervous, everyone wonders if they're ready - if they are learning - if they will be ready to test their best on finals. Even after finals, few law students truly understand why they got the grades they did. It's scary! And things like 0L prep make it worse for everyone.

When you read 4 E&Es before law school, you aren't helping your grade, but you are rattling your saber. If it doesn't come up, congrats: You're starting 1L with a secret. It won't do anything good for your psychology. And if it comes up, others are going to be scared, worry that they're falling behind. It's an arms race that just burns people out, because 0Ls and young 1Ls don't know how to pick their battles with learning (and learning to apply) the law. It's a socially damaging practice, it's an academically damaging practice, and it gives TLS a bad reputation because as an institution we should be encouraging intelligent, proper approach to law school not the balls-to-the-wall hyper competitive under-effective overly stressful approach.

Make your own choices... but realize that to a lot of us who've recently survived the gauntlet, these 0L questions aren't just mildly obnoxious, their threats to the well being of a generation of law students as well as TLS and its reputation. That's a little overly dramatic, I'll grant you, but maybe hearing it will help the 0Ls understand our visceral response.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby 98234872348 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:26 am

In his post, Disco, as per usual, brings up an important point. I believe that one of the best strategies I employed during 1L was to ignore "the crowd" and craft my own study plan. About half way through my first semester I decided it would be best if I focused on myself and my study habits rather than leer over my shoulder to see how much studying my classmates were doing and what hornbooks they had. Law school is scary and competitive, but at some point you've just got to focus your effort on learning how to apply the law you're being taught in class to the facts. Don't get caught up in the gossip circle who disdains about how much studying so-and-so is doing or goes out and spends 400 dollars on supplements for a single class in a frantic effort to study "more comprehensively" than everyone else. By the time most people enter law school, they know how to study effectively; do what works for you, don't follow the crowd, because that will only cause unnecessary anxiety in an already heavily stressful environment, and you want to take advantage of every competitive edge you can.

I hope disco is around next year, I will need someone to argue with over whether a statement given to police 15 minutes after a fight while the victim is still bleeding is allowed into evidence under the excited utterance exception to the hearsay rule. (no, I am not a 1L gunner, I actually had a research assignment on this issue and it reaffirmed my confidence that I will like Evidence next year).

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby MURPH » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:19 pm

Thanks for bringing the discussion back on track. Telling the OP and me to shut up was not helpful. The later posts are helpful. I don't think it is too different from what Thane wrote:
I recommend that you prepare carefully, modestly, and intently, building an awareness and understanding of the framework of each of the six major subjects. We’re talking about a few dozen hours for each subject. Into those frameworks you will put the specific knowledge as you approach each topic in law school.
or what I wrote:
I just crack open a book when it gets slow at work or instead of watching TV at home. Prepping doesn't prevent me from hiking or going to the beach when I want to. It just keeps me from actually wasting my time doing stupid shit while I am waiting for something better to do.

I'll watch out for burnout and keep the prepping light.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby xyzbca » Sat Jul 10, 2010 7:50 pm

I guess I don't understand why people are so passionate about this topic. From the 0L perspective, I think Disco hit the nail on the head in that there is a percentage of 0L's who want to listen to that 10% of the population that will tell them they are brilliant for doing 0L prep. I just don't understand why people get so worked up over this, especially the 0L's who crave affirmation for what they are doing. Read the poster above who waxed poetically about this being "[his] mistake to make." Who even thinks like that? That's the kind of crap that comes out of Hollywood pre-packaged in a Cheez Whiz can.

From my experience, assuming hard work, I think 1L grades are for the most part set in stone on day 1 of classes.

I know that people want to believe that if they just work at something hard enough they really can accomplish whatever they work on but law school puts an end to that fantasy (in the same way that getting cut from a high school sports team ends that fantasy for others at a young age). IMHO, 1L exams don't reward hard work or preparation. 1L exams reward personality types. The more anal/OCD you are the better you will do on 1L exams. Strong writing and knowledge of the material are required for success, but at the end of the day I think it really boils down to your personality.

But I still don't understand why people are so passionate about this. If some future Gunner in the class of 2013 wants to start gunning just a little bit earlier than others I say go for it. If the collective wisdom of 90% of TLS isn't enough to stop him from blooming into his full Gunner glory, nothing will. Conversely, if 90% of TLS thinks it is a bad idea for you to do prep work, nothing you say will convince TLS otherwise.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby prezidentv8 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 7:51 pm

Law School Grades = f(minimum level of hard work, luck, writing style, test day execution)

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby 270910 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 7:57 pm

prezidentv8 wrote:Law School Grades = f(minimum level of hard work, luck, writing style, test day execution)


xyzbca wrote:I know that people want to believe that if they just work at something hard enough they really can accomplish whatever they work on but law school puts an end to that fantasy (in the same way that getting cut from a high school sports team ends that fantasy for others at a young age). IMHO, 1L exams don't reward hard work or preparation. 1L exams reward personality types.


This is the stupidest bullshit I've ever read. And, especially given the number of times I've quit this website, I've read a lot of stupid bullshit. 1L exams reward getting points on law school exams and penalize not getting points on law school exams. Everyone comes out of it feeling like it was a terrifying and random experience because there is 0 useful feedback. And not having any feedback on an entirely new skill set makes it impossible to learn unless you figure out how on your own. Since most people don't even realize they should be doing that, and even those who do are on their own, what shakes out is very random feeling.

But it's not luck. They're not tossed down stairs, it's not about your writing's flare or flourish.

It's points on the fucking exams.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby prezidentv8 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 8:40 pm

disco_barred wrote:
prezidentv8 wrote:Law School Grades = f(minimum level of hard work, luck, writing style, test day execution)


xyzbca wrote:I know that people want to believe that if they just work at something hard enough they really can accomplish whatever they work on but law school puts an end to that fantasy (in the same way that getting cut from a high school sports team ends that fantasy for others at a young age). IMHO, 1L exams don't reward hard work or preparation. 1L exams reward personality types.


This is the stupidest bullshit I've ever read. And, especially given the number of times I've quit this website, I've read a lot of stupid bullshit. 1L exams reward getting points on law school exams and penalize not getting points on law school exams. Everyone comes out of it feeling like it was a terrifying and random experience because there is 0 useful feedback. And not having any feedback on an entirely new skill set makes it impossible to learn unless you figure out how on your own. Since most people don't even realize they should be doing that, and even those who do are on their own, what shakes out is very random feeling.

But it's not luck. They're not tossed down stairs, it's not about your writing's flare or flourish.

It's points on the fucking exams.


Well, yeah - duh. But just because a standard exists doesn't mean luck/style do not apply. The problem is that each prof gives/takes points differently, and you don't know how to earn points going into a given exam. The BLL itself is easy enough that 90% of the people in a given class should know and be able to apply the law just fine. So, to me, it's a matter of getting as much substance as possible on the page in the allotted time/words, addressing what the prof wants you to address in the manner he wants you to address it, and finding and arguing tough issues that might be a stretch. Example: you have a tight word limit and too many issues to address - how do you choose what to address and how much detail to go into on each issue? Depth of substance or quantity of issues? Do you state assumptions or reason through them? Do you state the law or just go into application? Granted, you can try and get this out of your profs, but in my experience, enough ball-hiding goes on to make this nearly a completely futile effort.

Edit: Another example: choosing to omit proper rules of grammar for sake of speed/word count.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby OperaSoprano » Sat Jul 10, 2010 8:51 pm

disco_barred wrote:
prezidentv8 wrote:Law School Grades = f(minimum level of hard work, luck, writing style, test day execution)


xyzbca wrote:I know that people want to believe that if they just work at something hard enough they really can accomplish whatever they work on but law school puts an end to that fantasy (in the same way that getting cut from a high school sports team ends that fantasy for others at a young age). IMHO, 1L exams don't reward hard work or preparation. 1L exams reward personality types.


This is the stupidest bullshit I've ever read. And, especially given the number of times I've quit this website, I've read a lot of stupid bullshit. 1L exams reward getting points on law school exams and penalize not getting points on law school exams. Everyone comes out of it feeling like it was a terrifying and random experience because there is 0 useful feedback. And not having any feedback on an entirely new skill set makes it impossible to learn unless you figure out how on your own. Since most people don't even realize they should be doing that, and even those who do are on their own, what shakes out is very random feeling.

But it's not luck. They're not tossed down stairs, it's not about your writing's flare or flourish.

It's points on the fucking exams.


I got to see my Crim Law exam a few months into second semester (our prof had left them on file), and could literally count the check marks. I do have a confession to make, though. I had planned to prep as a 0L, and I bought all the E&Es months ahead of time, but I just got so busy that I really didn't. I felt guilty and worried, but of course it had zero effect on my performance as a 1L. I will say this: if you want to do one useful thing before you start, focus on increasing your typing speed. I think my 40 wpm on a good day threshold did handicap me somewhat, because I left several exams knowing I had left points on the table and just run out of time. My longest ever exam was 3,800 words in 4 hours. I managed to do just fine, and I am happy with my grades, but if I had this to do over again, I would have downloaded one of those "learn how to type" programs and fixed my shoddy typing. That is an issue worth addressing.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby prezidentv8 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 8:53 pm

OperaSoprano wrote:I will say this: if you want to do one useful thing before you start, focus on increasing your typing speed. I think my 40 wpm on a good day threshold did handicap me somewhat, because I left several exams knowing I had left points on the table and just run out of time. My longest ever exam was 3,800 words in 4 hours. I managed to do just fine, and I am happy with my grades, but if I had this to do over again, I would have downloaded one of those "learn how to type" programs and fixed my shoddy typing. That is an issue worth addressing.



I so agree. So so so so agree.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby OperaSoprano » Sat Jul 10, 2010 8:54 pm

prezidentv8 wrote:
disco_barred wrote:
prezidentv8 wrote:Law School Grades = f(minimum level of hard work, luck, writing style, test day execution)


xyzbca wrote:I know that people want to believe that if they just work at something hard enough they really can accomplish whatever they work on but law school puts an end to that fantasy (in the same way that getting cut from a high school sports team ends that fantasy for others at a young age). IMHO, 1L exams don't reward hard work or preparation. 1L exams reward personality types.


This is the stupidest bullshit I've ever read. And, especially given the number of times I've quit this website, I've read a lot of stupid bullshit. 1L exams reward getting points on law school exams and penalize not getting points on law school exams. Everyone comes out of it feeling like it was a terrifying and random experience because there is 0 useful feedback. And not having any feedback on an entirely new skill set makes it impossible to learn unless you figure out how on your own. Since most people don't even realize they should be doing that, and even those who do are on their own, what shakes out is very random feeling.

But it's not luck. They're not tossed down stairs, it's not about your writing's flare or flourish.

It's points on the fucking exams.


Well, yeah - duh. But just because a standard exists doesn't mean luck/style do not apply. The problem is that each prof gives/takes points differently, and you don't know how to earn points going into a given exam. The BLL itself is easy enough that 90% of the people in a given class should know and be able to apply the law just fine. So, to me, it's a matter of getting as much substance as possible on the page in the allotted time/words, addressing what the prof wants you to address in the manner he wants you to address it, and finding and arguing tough issues that might be a stretch. Example: you have a tight word limit and too many issues to address - how do you choose what to address and how much detail to go into on each issue? Depth of substance or quantity of issues? Do you state assumptions or reason through them? Do you state the law or just go into application? Granted, you can try and get this out of your profs, but in my experience, enough ball-hiding goes on to make this nearly a completely futile effort.

Edit: Another example: choosing to omit proper rules of grammar for sake of speed/word count.


Usually rewarded, from everything I have seen and heard, though an occasional professor might get annoyed at you for it. I am given to understand that the best students turn in exams ridden with spelling and grammar errors but full of law applied to facts, and generally quite a bit longer than the class average.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby prezidentv8 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 8:57 pm

OperaSoprano wrote:Usually rewarded, from everything I have seen and heard, though an occasional professor might get annoyed at you for it. I am given to understand that the best students turn in exams ridden with spelling and grammar errors but full of law applied to facts, and generally quite a bit longer than the class average.


Yeah I've generally just butchered my grammar, but fearfully.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby OperaSoprano » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:00 pm

prezidentv8 wrote:
OperaSoprano wrote:Usually rewarded, from everything I have seen and heard, though an occasional professor might get annoyed at you for it. I am given to understand that the best students turn in exams ridden with spelling and grammar errors but full of law applied to facts, and generally quite a bit longer than the class average.


Yeah I've generally just butchered my grammar, but fearfully.


It's a challenge for me. My natural instinct is to read back over everything and edit the crap out of it. I won't even make a TLS post without rereading it, so it was really, really hard for me to just go ahead guns blazing on exams. I am honestly looking forward to take home exams (less time pressure) with word limits, since I've had to learn how to make the best of short exams.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby prezidentv8 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:06 pm

OperaSoprano wrote:
prezidentv8 wrote:
OperaSoprano wrote:Usually rewarded, from everything I have seen and heard, though an occasional professor might get annoyed at you for it. I am given to understand that the best students turn in exams ridden with spelling and grammar errors but full of law applied to facts, and generally quite a bit longer than the class average.


Yeah I've generally just butchered my grammar, but fearfully.


It's a challenge for me. My natural instinct is to read back over everything and edit the crap out of it. I won't even make a TLS post without rereading it, so it was really, really hard for me to just go ahead guns blazing on exams. I am honestly looking forward to take home exams (less time pressure) with word limits, since I've had to learn how to make the best of short exams.


Yeah if I have time to wordsmith I generally move up on the curve. Damn history major taught me to be thorough, which I have been told by a few profs was a problem on their exams. On the other hand, another prof told me he wanted more detail on issues, less issue spotting.

As it is, my own grades seem completely random and out of my control, but maybe I'm just not adaptable enough, prof-to-prof (as my opinion above might indicate).

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby solotee » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:18 pm

disco_barred wrote: They're not tossed down stairs, it's not about your writing's flare or flourish.

It's points on the fucking exams.


Ugh dude, you're wrong.

http://www.concurringopinions.com/archi ... _grad.html

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby 270910 » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:23 pm

solotee wrote:
disco_barred wrote: They're not tossed down stairs, it's not about your writing's flare or flourish.

It's points on the fucking exams.


Ugh dude, you're wrong.

http://www.concurringopinions.com/archi ... _grad.html


It's a new and strange non sequitur to counter my joke referencing that post with that post. It's like a snake unfunnily eating its own tail.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby doyleoil » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:29 pm

This is obviously very professor and exam-dependent, but the typing speed thing just doesn't hold in every instance. Legend has it one of our SCOTUS clerks (now a professor at George Mason) wrote about 1500 words on a 3 hour Torts final with no word limit for Richard Epstein and got either a 185 or 186 (the top two grades on our scale...grades that are almost never awarded).

In any case, knowing precisely what cuts to the heart of questions is far better than info-dumping everything you scribbled (or typed) in class.

[That being said, if you haven't actually answered questions, more words are probably necessary. :)]

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby presh » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:59 pm

.
Last edited by presh on Sun Dec 27, 2015 2:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby xyzbca » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:07 pm

disco_barred wrote:
prezidentv8 wrote:Law School Grades = f(minimum level of hard work, luck, writing style, test day execution)


xyzbca wrote:I know that people want to believe that if they just work at something hard enough they really can accomplish whatever they work on but law school puts an end to that fantasy (in the same way that getting cut from a high school sports team ends that fantasy for others at a young age). IMHO, 1L exams don't reward hard work or preparation. 1L exams reward personality types.


This is the stupidest bullshit I've ever read. And, especially given the number of times I've quit this website, I've read a lot of stupid bullshit. 1L exams reward getting points on law school exams and penalize not getting points on law school exams. Everyone comes out of it feeling like it was a terrifying and random experience because there is 0 useful feedback. And not having any feedback on an entirely new skill set makes it impossible to learn unless you figure out how on your own. Since most people don't even realize they should be doing that, and even those who do are on their own, what shakes out is very random feeling.

But it's not luck. They're not tossed down stairs, it's not about your writing's flare or flourish.

It's points on the fucking exams.


1. Congrats on knocking down that straw man. I never suggested there was randomness or luck involved. FTR: I do not believe randomness or luck is involved.

2. No fucking shit that law school exams reward scoring points? Really? Thanks for the insightful revelation there.

Now: Who do you think it is that is scoring the most points? You think it is the person who glosses over tiny little details in a fact pattern or the OCD individual that worries about and then discusses every single thing presented in a fact pattern?

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby ogurty » Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:00 am

doyleoil wrote:This is obviously very professor and exam-dependent, but the typing speed thing just doesn't hold in every instance. Legend has it one of our SCOTUS clerks (now a professor at George Mason) wrote about 1500 words on a 3 hour Torts final with no word limit for Richard Epstein and got either a 185 or 186 (the top two grades on our scale...grades that are almost never awarded).

In any case, knowing precisely what cuts to the heart of questions is far better than info-dumping everything you scribbled (or typed) in class.

[That being said, if you haven't actually answered questions, more words are probably necessary. :)]


Being able to type fast is not really related to typing a whole lot of words. Typing fast frees up a lot of time for more thinking, analyzing, outlining, organizing, or even more typing as necessary. It is not possible that, all other things held equal, the guy who spends his minutes hunting for the "N" key scores better than the fast typer. I think it was Mark Twain who said something along the lines of, "Sorry this note is so long - I would have made it shorter, but I didn't have enough time."

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby chicoalto0649 » Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:35 am

Is OP a professor at Fordham?

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby 98234872348 » Sun Jul 11, 2010 3:14 am

prezidentv8 wrote:
OperaSoprano wrote:I will say this: if you want to do one useful thing before you start, focus on increasing your typing speed. I think my 40 wpm on a good day threshold did handicap me somewhat, because I left several exams knowing I had left points on the table and just run out of time. My longest ever exam was 3,800 words in 4 hours. I managed to do just fine, and I am happy with my grades, but if I had this to do over again, I would have downloaded one of those "learn how to type" programs and fixed my shoddy typing. That is an issue worth addressing.



I so agree. So so so so agree.

This is really credited. Even if it doesn't help you on the exam, it'll be helpful in class (though: disclaimer, don't write down every word your professor says, participate in class and think about the hypos being discussed by your professor, this is the one of the most important parts of LS, IMHO. Some people would disagree.)

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby jayn3 » Sun Jul 11, 2010 3:31 am

OperaSoprano wrote:I will say this: if you want to do one useful thing before you start, focus on increasing your typing speed. I think my 40 wpm on a good day threshold did handicap me somewhat, because I left several exams knowing I had left points on the table and just run out of time. My longest ever exam was 3,800 words in 4 hours. I managed to do just fine, and I am happy with my grades, but if I had this to do over again, I would have downloaded one of those "learn how to type" programs and fixed my shoddy typing. That is an issue worth addressing.

semi related: if you already spend too much time typing and have developed carpal tunnel, buy an ergonomic keyboard and/or avoid stressing your tendons.

to be fair, i have done neither of these things, but i'm 100% certain i'll be regretting it by mid-october.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby MD/JD2B » Sun Jul 11, 2010 3:44 am

On TLS you are hearing opinions about the law from people who have never practiced it. Sure, you get clues about study techniques and the likes but I'd love to see some actual attorneys with 15-20 years experience discuss some of the issues raised. I had opinions about medicine, medical school and training back when, but they differ slightly after 20 years in practice. I think some of the practical advice on TLS (typing speed, organization, etc.) have been outstanding, but let opinions be what they are and consider where they are coming from.

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Re: Closing Thoughts

Postby prezidentv8 » Sun Jul 11, 2010 3:46 am

MD/JD2B wrote:On TLS you are hearing opinions about the law from people who have never practiced it. Sure, you get clues about study techniques and the likes but I'd love to see some actual attorneys with 15-20 years experience discuss some of the issues raised. I had opinions about medicine, medical school and training back when, but they differ slightly after 20 years in practice. I think some of the practical advice on TLS (typing speed, organization, etc.) have been outstanding, but let opinions be what they are and consider where they are coming from.


Why would an actual attorney's opinion about a law school exam be more relevant than a current student's? I thought this thread was only about practical advice.....




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