Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

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artichoke
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby artichoke » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:01 am

ram jam wrote:
All these phrases they’re supposed to know. What do they mean?


... fucking magnets, how do they work?


I don't wanna talk to no scientist, y'all motherfuckers lyin, and makin me PISSED

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baby lawyer
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby baby lawyer » Fri Jun 25, 2010 11:10 am

Thane, although not all here may appreciate your writing style - which I'm guessing is deliberately dramatic to leave an impression on the reader - I, for one, appreciate the underlying message.

1L year DOES put almost everyone through a rollercoaster of highs and lows (occasionally terrifying lows), as personal observations and the countless anxiety-wracked and OCD posts here demonstrate. I took this as your way of trying to convey the 1L experience more palpably for those who aren't there yet, and I thought it was pretty good.

Not sure about the rest of your book, and I hope the other parts have some good tips on how to stay ahead of the game (at least mentally), but I think that perhaps some 0Ls who haven't had exposure to many law students will be able to benefit from reading about what they, too, can expect from their first year. Good luck to you!

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Thane Messinger » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:06 pm

baby lawyer wrote:Thane, although not all here may appreciate your writing style - which I'm guessing is deliberately dramatic to leave an impression on the reader - I, for one, appreciate the underlying message.

1L year DOES put almost everyone through a rollercoaster of highs and lows (occasionally terrifying lows), as personal observations and the countless anxiety-wracked and OCD posts here demonstrate. I took this as your way of trying to convey the 1L experience more palpably for those who aren't there yet, and I thought it was pretty good.

Not sure about the rest of your book, and I hope the other parts have some good tips on how to stay ahead of the game (at least mentally), but I think that perhaps some 0Ls who haven't had exposure to many law students will be able to benefit from reading about what they, too, can expect from their first year. Good luck to you!


Thank you, BL, and to be honest it never occurred to me that the intent of the style, to convey the closed-in, almost tunnel-like (if not borderline psychotic) atmosphere of law school, would not be obvious. I would hope the second post makes that plain, at least with regard to the rest of the book. In any event, you're quite right that this is exactly the type of environment law school produces. Clearly, we're rather nicer in person than we are as icons on some anonymous forum, but the pressures and insecurities build just as surely. If anything it's worse, because the psy-ops tend to take a more subversive turn in the real world of law school classrooms, libraries, and hallways. Again, I find this fascinating: it struck me that this conversation, such as it is, is an exaggerated example of what happens in law school, and is, ironically, perhaps the best defense of the message behind this purposely bizzare paragraph.

Again, thank you,

Thane.
Last edited by Thane Messinger on Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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philosoraptor
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby philosoraptor » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:31 pm

Thane Messinger wrote:[T]o be honest it never occurred to me that the intent of the style, to convey the closed-in, almost tunnel-like atmosphere of law school, would not be obvious. I would hope the second post makes that plain, at least with regard to the rest of the book. In any event, you're quite right that this is exactly the type of environment law school produces. ... [It] struck me that this conversation, such as it is, is an exaggerated example of what happens in law school, and is, ironically, perhaps the best defense of the message behind this purposely bizzare paragraph.
Thane, I don't think it was ever a question of the "hidden meaning" of the paragraph going over anyone's head. You can rationalize the gimmick, but it's still a gimmick, and one that's designed to annoy your readers.

If I were your editor, I would try to convince you that that's not a good idea, and that if you don't think your ideas are being conveyed properly without it, that's a problem with the writing, not the formatting. That plus all the screwy similes is what bothered me. There's a big difference between making your readers get a sense of dread and confusion through the skillful use of imagery and diction, and making them wince and think, "Wow, what is this guy's problem?"

Anyway, I appreciate your efforts to educate us, but I hope you understand why we criticize some of your editorial decisions -- and it's not because we don't "get it."

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Thane Messinger » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:42 pm

philosoraptor wrote:Thane, I don't think it was ever a question of the "hidden meaning" of the paragraph going over anyone's head. You can rationalize the gimmick, but it's still a gimmick, and one that's designed to annoy your readers.

If I were your editor, I would try to convince you that that's not a good idea, and that if you don't think your ideas are being conveyed properly without it, that's a problem with the writing, not the formatting. That plus all the screwy similes is what bothered me. There's a big difference between making your readers get a sense of dread and confusion through the skillful use of imagery and diction, and making them wince and think, "Wow, what is this guy's problem?"

Anyway, I appreciate your efforts to educate us, but I hope you understand why we criticize some of your editorial decisions -- and it's not because we don't "get it."



Fair enough, philosoraptor, although I don't think I conveyed--or at least did not intend to convey--that readers here were too dense to get it. Quite the opposite. This forum was recommended to me by someone I respect based on the qualities of its participants. There is certainly much room to critique and, of course, in the final analysis it's up to each reader to determine. My effort was to be a voice challenging the conventional wisdom. (The irony here is that, in most other circumstances, I am the counter-revolutionary.)

Thane.

PS: I like your online handle.

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baby lawyer
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby baby lawyer » Fri Jun 25, 2010 4:31 pm

On a slight tangent -- IMHO, one of the most annoying things about law school is that it's so good at coaxing out people's pettiest and most smallminded qualities and reinforcing them - through curves, rankings, in-class humiliation, whatever.... SO many times as a 1L, I've seen classmates snicker and point out other people's tiniest flaws on their legal writing papers, in class, during moot court, whatever. It just highlights their own insecurities and reeks of desperation - like they're so beaten down that pointing out their classmates' most insignificant mistakes actually gives them some misguided sense of victory...

From what I have seen, Thane Messinger's posts have been helpful and respectful, and some of the responses on here remind me of the conditioned douchebaggery I've observed in my own school. A lot of snarky posts on TLS are funny, but sometimes they're just so supercilious and annoying that I just want to reach into the screen and slap these people. Or give them a hug and tell them it'll all be okay.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby nealric » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:00 pm

Thane,

I appreciate your contributions here and on LSD. However, that was one of the longest single paragraphs I have ever seen written in the English language. Really and truly, it should have been six or seven paragraphs.

--ImageRemoved--

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philosoraptor
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby philosoraptor » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:11 pm

baby lawyer wrote:On a slight tangent -- IMHO, one of the most annoying things about law school is that it's so good at coaxing out people's pettiest and most smallminded qualities and reinforcing them - through curves, rankings, in-class humiliation, whatever.... SO many times as a 1L, I've seen classmates snicker and point out other people's tiniest flaws on their legal writing papers, in class, during moot court, whatever. It just highlights their own insecurities and reeks of desperation - like they're so beaten down that pointing out their classmates' most insignificant mistakes actually gives them some misguided sense of victory...

From what I have seen, Thane Messinger's posts have been helpful and respectful, and some of the responses on here remind me of the conditioned douchebaggery I've observed in my own school. A lot of snarky posts on TLS are funny, but sometimes they're just so supercilious and annoying that I just want to reach into the screen and slap these people. Or give them a hug and tell them it'll all be okay.
Was this directed at me? :shock:

In any case:

Offering feedback (whether light or heavy on snark) to someone using TLS to sell a book = appropriate.
Offering unsolicited feedback to classmates = inappropriate. Entirely different situations.

Also, I'm pretty sure much of the initial negativity stems from the fact that if any "normal" poster started a thread to sell a book or -- worse yet -- promote a blog, he'd be banned instantly. By now it's clear that Thane is allowed to do so, and because of his thoughtful, polite replies, I'm over it. I'm happy to hear what he has to say, and I'm pretty sure he can handle it if we challenge his ideas or his writing style. Why else would he be hanging out here?

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby KmissP » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:44 pm

nealric wrote:Thane,

I appreciate your contributions here and on LSD. However, that was one of the longest single paragraphs I have ever seen written in the English language. Really and truly, it should have been six or seven paragraphs.

--ImageRemoved--


Really and truly, a proficient writer could convey the same meaning and emphasize the point more effectively in one standard paragraph. Maybe two, if he or she is feeling verbose.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby mallard » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:47 pm

The problem isn't so much that the technique is heavy-handed or badly executed, although it's both of those things. The real problem is that the paragraph gives us a sense of being overwhelmed which you then try to solve with the content of the book. In other words, the paragraph actually causes the problem you're trying to solve. It seems dishonest to me. I appreciate this technique in literary contexts, but in commercial ones I find it kind of inappropriate.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby solidsnake » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:51 pm

mallard wrote:The problem isn't so much that the technique is heavy-handed or badly executed, although it's both of those things. The real problem is that the paragraph gives us a sense of being overwhelmed which you then try to solve with the content of the book. In other words, the paragraph actually causes the problem you're trying to solve. It seems dishonest to me. I appreciate this technique in literary contexts, but in commercial ones I find it kind of inappropriate.


This. And the solutions he recommends are questionable. And he never establishes credibility (at least not here). Being an "editor" on UT L. Rev. doesn't necessarily speak to his academic performance if he wrote on.
Last edited by solidsnake on Fri Jun 25, 2010 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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baby lawyer
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby baby lawyer » Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:59 pm

philosoraptor wrote:Was this directed at me? :shock:

In any case:

Offering feedback (whether light or heavy on snark) to someone using TLS to sell a book = appropriate.
Offering unsolicited feedback to classmates = inappropriate. Entirely different situations.

Also, I'm pretty sure much of the initial negativity stems from the fact that if any "normal" poster started a thread to sell a book or -- worse yet -- promote a blog, he'd be banned instantly. By now it's clear that Thane is allowed to do so, and because of his thoughtful, polite replies, I'm over it. I'm happy to hear what he has to say, and I'm pretty sure he can handle it if we challenge his ideas or his writing style. Why else would he be hanging out here?


Hi, no it wasn't directed at you or any one person in particular - i was sort of tangentially responding to the points the OP made in response to my earlier post - about the pressures of LS and its effects on people - and I meant that some of the posts I read on TLS remind me a lot of what I've actually seen in the classroom.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Thane Messinger » Fri Jun 25, 2010 6:28 pm

KmissP wrote:
nealric wrote:Thane,

I appreciate your contributions here and on LSD. However, that was one of the longest single paragraphs I have ever seen written in the English language. Really and truly, it should have been six or seven paragraphs.

--ImageRemoved--


Really and truly, a proficient writer could convey the same meaning and emphasize the point more effectively in one standard paragraph. Maybe two, if he or she is feeling verbose.



To both and all, I agree, but this is the whole point. The paragraph is designed to mirror the classroom environment that actually exists. But don't take my word for it. Ask anyone who's been there.

By the way, the guide I used as to this section was not I (certainly not he), nor was it a proper English gent, nor was it anyone who had not yet been through law school. It was current law students and lawyers long out of school, and the general reaction was "Wow. Nailed it." I leave it to you to decide on the reliability of these words, or on my statement of others' reactions, or to debate the literary merits. It either speaks to you or it doesn't.

Either way, a concise statement such as is conventionally done by a proficient writer would, in my opinion, simply not have properly conveyed the purpose: giving the readers some sense of the reality they are about to enter, that they might challenge their own preconceptions of what they think law school is going to be all about.

Thane.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Thane Messinger » Fri Jun 25, 2010 6:41 pm

mallard wrote:The problem isn't so much that the technique is heavy-handed or badly executed, although it's both of those things. The real problem is that the paragraph gives us a sense of being overwhelmed which you then try to solve with the content of the book. In other words, the paragraph actually causes the problem you're trying to solve. It seems dishonest to me. I appreciate this technique in literary contexts, but in commercial ones I find it kind of inappropriate.


This is an understandable response, but it is part of the broader issue of why the paragraph is as it is. The paragraph reflects the reality, it doesn't create it. You (as a group) do that.

The paragraph doesn't "cause" the problem. Here's where I find this most amusing. Practically everyone has pat advice (Don't worry, get drunk, etc.), and the reality in law school is obviously different. It's not different because I say so; it's different because it IS different. Whether one approaches this by disregarding the above, or by panicking, or by following all or none of the advice, what is in it is either true or not true (or just overstated or, as mentioned, badly and overstated). This, again, is up to each of us to determine.

Thane.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Cleareyes » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:00 pm

Thane Messinger wrote:To both and all, I agree, but this is the whole point. The paragraph is designed to mirror the classroom environment that actually exists. But don't take my word for it. Ask anyone who's been there.

By the way, the guide I used as to this section was not I (certainly not he), nor was it a proper English gent, nor was it anyone who had not yet been through law school. It was current law students and lawyers long out of school, and the general reaction was "Wow. Nailed it." I leave it to you to decide on the reliability of these words, or on my statement of others' reactions, or to debate the literary merits. It either speaks to you or it doesn't.

Either way, a concise statement such as is conventionally done by a proficient writer would, in my opinion, simply not have properly conveyed the purpose: giving the readers some sense of the reality they are about to enter, that they might challenge their own preconceptions of what they think law school is going to be all about.

Thane.


Mallard and I HAVE been there. We're both rising 2Ls. I will say for my part that that passage did not mirror the classroom environment that actually existed for me. I really liked class for the most part. And while I won't claim that I got the best grades I would say I did decently well, and in the classes where I didn't do as well as I would have liked it was almost always because I didn't put sufficient time into them. Insofar as 1L was a time crunch it was because I took on a lot of activities in school and didn't use my time all that efficiently. But I knew I was being inefficient when I was being inefficient. Playing Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2 with your torts book open on the couch next to you doesn't actually help you learn torts (That's a free law school protip, everyone!)

As for my classmates well, people were busy, people were stressed, people were confused. In other words it was like any other rigorous academic class where there's also lots of competition. But my section also had a very healthy contingent of volleyball players and there were lots of trips out to sing karaoke and nobody was terrified of being called on except those who hate public speaking in general and nobody was praying for just a single H to save their 'dignity.' as if report cards measure dignity.

You said to ask anyone who's been there. I've been there. I asked me. My answer is that your paragraph is full of cliches and overdramatizations and the mystification of law school and very light on describing what my experiences and those of my classmates seem to have been.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby mallard » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:02 pm

Cleareyes wrote:
Thane Messinger wrote:To both and all, I agree, but this is the whole point. The paragraph is designed to mirror the classroom environment that actually exists. But don't take my word for it. Ask anyone who's been there.

By the way, the guide I used as to this section was not I (certainly not he), nor was it a proper English gent, nor was it anyone who had not yet been through law school. It was current law students and lawyers long out of school, and the general reaction was "Wow. Nailed it." I leave it to you to decide on the reliability of these words, or on my statement of others' reactions, or to debate the literary merits. It either speaks to you or it doesn't.

Either way, a concise statement such as is conventionally done by a proficient writer would, in my opinion, simply not have properly conveyed the purpose: giving the readers some sense of the reality they are about to enter, that they might challenge their own preconceptions of what they think law school is going to be all about.

Thane.


Mallard and I HAVE been there. We're both rising 2Ls. I will say for my part that that passage did not mirror the classroom environment that actually existed for me. I really liked class for the most part. And while I won't claim that I got the best grades I would say I did decently well, and in the classes where I didn't do as well as I would have liked it was almost always because I didn't put sufficient time into them. Insofar as 1L was a time crunch it was because I took on a lot of activities in school and didn't use my time all that efficiently. But I knew I was being inefficient when I was being inefficient. Playing Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2 with your torts book open on the couch next to you doesn't actually help you learn torts (That's a free law school protip, everyone!)

As for my classmates well, people were busy, people were stressed, people were confused. In other words it was like any other rigorous academic class where there's also lots of competition. But my section also had a very healthy contingent of volleyball players and there were lots of trips out to sing karaoke and nobody was terrified of being called on except those who hate public speaking in general and nobody was praying for just a single H to save their 'dignity.' as if report cards measure dignity.

You said to ask anyone who's been there. I've been there. I asked me. My answer is that your paragraph is full of cliches and overdramatizations and the mystification of law school and very light on describing what my experiences and those of my classmates seem to have been.


Wow. Nailed it.

;)

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Cleareyes » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:25 pm

mallard wrote:
Cleareyes wrote:
Thane Messinger wrote:To both and all, I agree, but this is the whole point. The paragraph is designed to mirror the classroom environment that actually exists. But don't take my word for it. Ask anyone who's been there.

By the way, the guide I used as to this section was not I (certainly not he), nor was it a proper English gent, nor was it anyone who had not yet been through law school. It was current law students and lawyers long out of school, and the general reaction was "Wow. Nailed it." I leave it to you to decide on the reliability of these words, or on my statement of others' reactions, or to debate the literary merits. It either speaks to you or it doesn't.

Either way, a concise statement such as is conventionally done by a proficient writer would, in my opinion, simply not have properly conveyed the purpose: giving the readers some sense of the reality they are about to enter, that they might challenge their own preconceptions of what they think law school is going to be all about.

Thane.


Mallard and I HAVE been there. We're both rising 2Ls. I will say for my part that that passage did not mirror the classroom environment that actually existed for me. I really liked class for the most part. And while I won't claim that I got the best grades I would say I did decently well, and in the classes where I didn't do as well as I would have liked it was almost always because I didn't put sufficient time into them. Insofar as 1L was a time crunch it was because I took on a lot of activities in school and didn't use my time all that efficiently. But I knew I was being inefficient when I was being inefficient. Playing Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2 with your torts book open on the couch next to you doesn't actually help you learn torts (That's a free law school protip, everyone!)

As for my classmates well, people were busy, people were stressed, people were confused. In other words it was like any other rigorous academic class where there's also lots of competition. But my section also had a very healthy contingent of volleyball players and there were lots of trips out to sing karaoke and nobody was terrified of being called on except those who hate public speaking in general and nobody was praying for just a single H to save their 'dignity.' as if report cards measure dignity.

You said to ask anyone who's been there. I've been there. I asked me. My answer is that your paragraph is full of cliches and overdramatizations and the mystification of law school and very light on describing what my experiences and those of my classmates seem to have been.


Wow. Nailed it.

;)


I'm thinking of buying this shirt and wearing it around school next year:

--ImageRemoved--

That way the sandwich guy at the Hark will know he better keep stocked up on peanut butter and jelly unless he wants to be zinged! Don't try to upsell me on that buffalo chicken wrap 'special' you have every damn day. PB&J's what I ordered and it's what I'm going to get!

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RUQRU
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby RUQRU » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:29 pm

Hi Thane,

Glad to see you are expanding the "conversation." You are very brave.

I cannot understand the vitriol about making money from publishing a book and talking about your book. Now, many here believe you are hawking your book so as to pay off the Gulfstream IV. However the reality of the publishing business is something you know well! I found this analysis, which is similar to many others:

The profits from the retail sale of a book go to a lot of middlemen. And when it comes right down to it, the author doesn't get very much of it.

Let's use this hypothetical book with a retail cover price of $20, just to use a figure that's easy to work with. The percentages I use below may vary... sometimes higher, sometimes lower, by perhaps 5%. I'm using averages.

The bookstore will generally buy that book for 40% off the cover price, or $12. So that other $8 is their profit... assuming they sell it for list price, which they often don't. Either way, they pay $12 to the wholesaler.

Most bookstore sales are purchased through a wholesaler, such as Ingram. Ingram buys the book for about 60% off the cover price, or in this case, $8.00. (They, of course, pass on a 40% discount to the stores, leaving them with a profit margin of 20% of list price, or $4 per book.)

The $8 the wholesaler pays the publisher is split with you, the author. But not 50/50! You look at your contract and you see that you're entitled to 10% of the list price, which in this case is $2 per book. But wait! You have an agent, who sold your book to the publisher for you! She's entitled to 15% of your royalties, which in this case is 30 cents per book, leaving you with a whopping $1.70 out of the list price of $20.00 for your book's sale.

Before taxes.
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Writing-Books-675/writer-profit-book.htm


In any event, lawyers sell advice for money. Some for a lot of money. I assume most of the nice folks on TLS want to go to "top" law schools and graduate in the top 10% of the class so they can get jobs working in "big law" so they can bill 2300 hours a year and make big bucks. So I assume they are not adverse to the capitalist system.

Now, you are not forcing anyone to buy your book, look at your book or even touch your book. You have no power to make anyone follow your advice or even read your advice. To add insult to injury, you probably don't even make much money from selling your book and yet you come here for all sorts of insults and abuse.

Why the animosity? Perhaps you could write a book about that! It would be fun.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Cleareyes » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:45 pm

Individual books don't make their authors a ton of profit, but hawking books is what authors do to make a living. Almost all midlist author do booksignings and tours whenever possible because sales add up.

Also Mr. Messinger's publisher is definitely not a traditional New York publishing house and assuming it's not a self-publishing company we don't know what his royalties are.

None of that is the point. There isn't a ton of animosity towards Mr. Messinger trying to sell his books here, though people ARE annoyed because his posts resemble spam. There is, instead, a lot of criticism of the content and of the message. That's what TLS does with all posts. We're a bunch of picky annoying law students and law students to be. When the meat of the month club salesman takes his sample case into the lion cage you don't get confused as to why he's being bitten. It's not because the lions are irritated by his pushy salesmanship.

And just as Mr. Messinger has every right to pimp his product we have every right to try to point out what we believe the flaws in his samples are. That's what forums are for. I'm not trying to prevent book sales in general, I'm just saying that this sample didn't impress me and as someone who has finished 1L it doesn't look like something that represented my experience. Like a little Amazon review. Others have thought it was good and have offered words of approval. It's almost like there's a discussion taking place.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby RUQRU » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:54 pm

Ah, but if you were truly mercenary you would tout his advice. Assume that everything Thane says guarantees the law student will end up at the bottom of his class. If you believe that, and want every possible advantage in making the top 10%, you would let all the noob 1Ls think this the greatest stuff ever. Then you could relax and ride the curve to victory, no?
Last edited by RUQRU on Sat Jun 26, 2010 6:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Cleareyes » Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:58 pm

RUQRU wrote:Ah, but if you were truly mercenary you would tout his advice. Assume that everything Thane says guarantees the law student will end up at the bottom of his class. If you believe that, and want every possible advance in making the top 10%, you would let all the noob 1Ls think this the greatest stuff ever. Then you could relax and ride the curve to victory, no?


A) I never claimed to be truly mercenary. I'm not.

B) I never said anything along the lines of Thane's advice guaranteeing anything. I don't think it will actually effect someone's law school performance much in either direction. Maybe it would be slightly helpful but reading the various free posts on TLS about how to do well in law school would probably offer MORE help.

C) I am going to be a 2L when the next crop of 1Ls hits. I won't be in their classes. It may shock you but I actually WON'T be repeating any classes from 1L year. I at least low passed everything. That means even if the advice were bad instead of neutral I would get one year of curve Pwn@ge, assuming that I was in class with anyone who had read the book, which seems unlikely just based on various probabilities.

D) Obvious question. Are you a Thane alt?

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Thane Messinger » Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:17 pm

Cleareyes wrote:
D) Obvious question. Are you a Thane alt?



Well, as much as I appreciate RUQRU's posts, and as little as it will help, I am not he (she?).

Thane.

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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby Thane Messinger » Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:21 pm

solidsnake wrote:
This. And the solutions he recommends are questionable. And he never establishes creditability (at least not here). Being an "editor" on UT L. Rev. doesn't necessarily speak to his academic performance if he wrote on.



Say, this is fun! You're right! There is that write on. Let's see . . . if he graded on, that means he's pretty smart. Oh and we might just have to give him some credit. But if he just wrote on, well, that means he convinced some mostly grade-on editors that he could write. Hey, wait.

Oh, bother.

TLR must've really gone down hill after the War.

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mallard
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby mallard » Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:22 pm

You're getting a little defensive, Thane. I'm sure there are some people, including those who have spoken up in this thread, who like and appreciate your product. It's probably best for you to leave it at that, at this point.

UWO-BADGPA
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Re: Setting the Stage: Or, How to Do Law School Wrong

Postby UWO-BADGPA » Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:23 pm

I can guarantee you he wrote all 8 of those reviews on Amazon




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