extra time on exams for disabilities

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20160810
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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby 20160810 » Sat May 15, 2010 4:42 pm

I don't know of anyone at my school who gets extra exam time for having ADD, but I would absolutely, without question, call them out for it. That's complete bullshit.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Sat May 15, 2010 4:43 pm

2009 Prospective wrote:
A'nold wrote:We are not comparing apples to apples when we are seeing who the better student is at applying law to facts in an issue spotter racehorse exam. If someone can "spot more issues" b/c the disabled person is 30 minutes "slower" but that person is way smarter than the speedster (or normal typist compared to a DISABLED person) I would way rather have the one that takes a half hour longer but is better than the one that his only talent > than the disabled person is that he thinks quicker or can type 1/2 hour faster than a disabled person that owns him in every other way. We need a more level playing field to show this guy/girl's talent. That disabled person is not a median student. They are a top of the class student, just slightly slower than a dumber person that is not disabled.


The very point of the racehorse exam is to ascertain who can spot issues quickly and efficiently and put it down on paper as cohesively as possible. This is largely what weeds out the A papers from the B- papers. As to a disabled person typing a half hour slower, what about those who are not disabled but also slow typists? Do we start accommodating for them as well? Sure, there also might be those that simply think a half hour slower. The point of a racehorse exam though is to distinguish those who can quickly move through issues from those that can't. Is it fair to accommodate for those that think slower because of a diagnosable "disability" from those that think 30 minutes slower for some other reason? You wouldn't see a high school 100m track event where runners with physical disabilities are given a 20 yard head start to accommodate for their disability. Why should it be any different here?

Giving extra time on a racehorse style exam is just too unfair. It essentially eliminates the whole purpose of such an exam. If any accommodation were to be made, I would argue in favor of a longer take-home style exam for all test takers rather than giving certain test takers special extra time.

Thinking slowly is not the issue. We are talking about people who have the mental ability to spot the issues but have deficiencies that preclude them from either seeing them or writing them down in the normal amount of time. A longer take-home exam gives normally able students an advantage over students with disabilities. The person with disabilities still has to deal with her need for time. Maybe its not an issue for some students with disabilities, but it is for me. I still physically cannot read fast enough to compete. Why should someone of normal ability have an advantage over me?

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby transferornot » Sat May 15, 2010 4:46 pm

2009 Prospective wrote:
A'nold wrote:We are not comparing apples to apples when we are seeing who the better student is at applying law to facts in an issue spotter racehorse exam. If someone can "spot more issues" b/c the disabled person is 30 minutes "slower" but that person is way smarter than the speedster (or normal typist compared to a DISABLED person) I would way rather have the one that takes a half hour longer but is better than the one that his only talent > than the disabled person is that he thinks quicker or can type 1/2 hour faster than a disabled person that owns him in every other way. We need a more level playing field to show this guy/girl's talent. That disabled person is not a median student. They are a top of the class student, just slightly slower than a dumber person that is not disabled.


The very point of the racehorse exam is to ascertain who can spot issues quickly and efficiently and put it down on paper as cohesively as possible. This is largely what weeds out the A papers from the B- papers. As to a disabled person typing a half hour slower, what about those who are not disabled but also slow typists? Do we start accommodating for them as well? Sure, there also might be those that simply think a half hour slower. The point of a racehorse exam though is to distinguish those who can quickly move through issues from those that can't. Is it fair to accommodate for those that think slower because of a diagnosable "disability" from those that think 30 minutes slower for some other reason? You wouldn't see a high school 100m track event where runners with physical disabilities are given a 20 yard head start to accommodate for their disability. Why should it be any different here?

Giving extra time on a racehorse style exam is just too unfair. It essentially eliminates the whole purpose of such an exam. If any accommodation were to be made, I would argue in favor of a longer take-home style exam for all test takers rather than giving certain test takers special extra time.

1. Did you not understand anything that matthies wrote about the process it is to get accomodations? If so, you would understand that you can't "give" accomodation so to those people that are slow typists.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Sat May 15, 2010 4:47 pm

SoftBoiledLife wrote:I don't know of anyone at my school who gets extra exam time for having ADD, but I would absolutely, without question, call them out for it. That's complete bullshit.

Not every case of ADD is easily manageable. Your statement is oversimplified.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby transferornot » Sat May 15, 2010 4:54 pm

okay question:
To those students in t14s that you know are disabled... are they usually in the top of their class?

Does an extra 1/2 hour on an exam make that BIG of a difference in a testing situation? I somehow have a hard time understanding this.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby 2009 Prospective » Sat May 15, 2010 5:03 pm

mikeytwoshoes wrote:
2009 Prospective wrote:
A'nold wrote:We are not comparing apples to apples when we are seeing who the better student is at applying law to facts in an issue spotter racehorse exam. If someone can "spot more issues" b/c the disabled person is 30 minutes "slower" but that person is way smarter than the speedster (or normal typist compared to a DISABLED person) I would way rather have the one that takes a half hour longer but is better than the one that his only talent > than the disabled person is that he thinks quicker or can type 1/2 hour faster than a disabled person that owns him in every other way. We need a more level playing field to show this guy/girl's talent. That disabled person is not a median student. They are a top of the class student, just slightly slower than a dumber person that is not disabled.


The very point of the racehorse exam is to ascertain who can spot issues quickly and efficiently and put it down on paper as cohesively as possible. This is largely what weeds out the A papers from the B- papers. As to a disabled person typing a half hour slower, what about those who are not disabled but also slow typists? Do we start accommodating for them as well? Sure, there also might be those that simply think a half hour slower. The point of a racehorse exam though is to distinguish those who can quickly move through issues from those that can't. Is it fair to accommodate for those that think slower because of a diagnosable "disability" from those that think 30 minutes slower for some other reason? You wouldn't see a high school 100m track event where runners with physical disabilities are given a 20 yard head start to accommodate for their disability. Why should it be any different here?

Giving extra time on a racehorse style exam is just too unfair. It essentially eliminates the whole purpose of such an exam. If any accommodation were to be made, I would argue in favor of a longer take-home style exam for all test takers rather than giving certain test takers special extra time.

Thinking slowly is not the issue. We are talking about people who have the mental ability to spot the issues but have deficiencies that preclude them from either seeing them or writing them down in the normal amount of time. A longer take-home exam gives normally able students an advantage over students with disabilities. The person with disabilities still has to deal with her need for time. Maybe its not an issue for some students with disabilities, but it is for me. I still physically cannot read fast enough to compete. Why should someone of normal ability have an advantage over me?


As to "thinking slowly", I was responding to A'nold's post. Someone with "normal" ability should have an advantage because their brain inherently allows them that advantage. The legal profession is one where mental capability is at a premium. Those that are slower or whatever mental disadvantage they might have are just simply not as well equipped to handle the profession as others. As many have rightfully pointed out, a partner with a client breathing down his neck can't simply accommodate to someone just because they take more time to read or can't put down their thoughts as easily onto paper. In my eyes, whether this is caused by some sort of diagnosable "disability" v. just being inherently less intelligent is moot when all is said and done. Sure, I absolutely have sympathy for those that have real and often debilitating mental disabilities. If it means they are less equipped to succeed in this profession though whether it be through a disability or some other mental handicap, then unfortunately they are just not as cut out for the job as well as those who do not have disabilities. Again, it's not that I don't feel sympathy for those with disabilities and I hope I don't sound like a condescending asshole.
Last edited by 2009 Prospective on Sat May 15, 2010 5:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Sat May 15, 2010 5:06 pm

transferornot wrote:okay question:
To those students in t14s that you know are disabled... are they usually in the top of their class?

Does an extra 1/2 hour on an exam make that BIG of a difference in a testing situation? I somehow have a hard time understanding this.

There is no way to know whether the extra time alone makes that big of a difference. Putting someone who honestly needs that time in a normal exam setting makes it impossible for them to compete to even a minimal amount. In my own experience, I know it takes me about twice the amount of time for me to read the questions. My eyes move too slowly. Accommodation for me is not about an advantage. It is a material condition for even basic success.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby 20160810 » Sat May 15, 2010 5:07 pm

mikeytwoshoes wrote:
transferornot wrote:okay question:
To those students in t14s that you know are disabled... are they usually in the top of their class?

Does an extra 1/2 hour on an exam make that BIG of a difference in a testing situation? I somehow have a hard time understanding this.

There is no way to know whether the extra time alone makes that big of a difference. Putting someone who honestly needs that time in a normal exam setting makes it impossible for them to compete to even a minimal amount. In my own experience, I know it takes me about twice the amount of time for me to read the questions. My eyes move too slowly. Accommodation for me is not about an advantage. It is a material condition for even basic success.

Do you plan to tell your clients to make accomodations for you when you're a practitioner too?

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby Matthies » Sat May 15, 2010 5:21 pm

2009 Prospective wrote:As to "thinking slowly", I was responding to A'nold's post. Someone with "normal" ability should have an advantage because their brain inherently allows them that advantage. The legal profession is one where mental capability is at a premium. Those that are slower or whatever mental disadvantage they might have are just simply not as well equipped to handle the profession as others. As many have rightfully pointed out, a partner with a client breathing down his neck can't simply accommodate to someone just because they take more time to read or can't put down their thoughts as easily onto paper. In my eyes, whether this is caused by some sort of diagnosable "disability" v. just being inherently less intelligent is moot when all is said and done. Sure, I absolutely have sympathy for those that have real and often debilitating mental disabilities. If it means they are less equipped to succeed in this profession though whether it be through a disability or some other mental handicap, then unfortunately they are just not as cut out for the job as well as those who do not have disabilities. Again, it's not that I don't feel sympathy for those with disabilities and I hope I don't sound like a condescending asshole.


There is a counter argument to this. Again I primarily know about deslyixa, because that's what I have struggled with, but that are numerous studies out there that claim people with dyslexia tend to have higher than average IQs. And tend to be better problem solvers than those without, because of the need to always work around their disability means they generally adapt better and quicker when faced with challenging tasks outside of those they are the most familiar with. Yet they score lower on standardized type exams because those exams are standardize on a learning model where their disability is most pronounced. Personally I don't know how much stock I put in that argument, nor the argument that "normal" people would be better at the law than someone with a disability. I just don't know, nor do I think that's something you can gage based on something as arbitrary law school grades.

I figure you will either end up being a good attorney or not, being a successful attorney or not, and lasting in the profession or not. Are all of the washouts those with disabilities? Perhaps, but even then statistically it would mean more normal people washout of the profession than disabled people do (seeing as how those with serious learning disabilities are a minority in higher education to start with). The odds of someone with a severe learning disability graduating HS are low, UG even lower, and making it through LS lower than that. If they beat all those odds then they take their chance of entering the profession and beating the odds of all lawyers that make it past 10 years.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby 2009 Prospective » Sat May 15, 2010 5:24 pm

transferornot wrote:
2009 Prospective wrote:
A'nold wrote:We are not comparing apples to apples when we are seeing who the better student is at applying law to facts in an issue spotter racehorse exam. If someone can "spot more issues" b/c the disabled person is 30 minutes "slower" but that person is way smarter than the speedster (or normal typist compared to a DISABLED person) I would way rather have the one that takes a half hour longer but is better than the one that his only talent > than the disabled person is that he thinks quicker or can type 1/2 hour faster than a disabled person that owns him in every other way. We need a more level playing field to show this guy/girl's talent. That disabled person is not a median student. They are a top of the class student, just slightly slower than a dumber person that is not disabled.


The very point of the racehorse exam is to ascertain who can spot issues quickly and efficiently and put it down on paper as cohesively as possible. This is largely what weeds out the A papers from the B- papers. As to a disabled person typing a half hour slower, what about those who are not disabled but also slow typists? Do we start accommodating for them as well? Sure, there also might be those that simply think a half hour slower. The point of a racehorse exam though is to distinguish those who can quickly move through issues from those that can't. Is it fair to accommodate for those that think slower because of a diagnosable "disability" from those that think 30 minutes slower for some other reason? You wouldn't see a high school 100m track event where runners with physical disabilities are given a 20 yard head start to accommodate for their disability. Why should it be any different here?

Giving extra time on a racehorse style exam is just too unfair. It essentially eliminates the whole purpose of such an exam. If any accommodation were to be made, I would argue in favor of a longer take-home style exam for all test takers rather than giving certain test takers special extra time.

1. Did you not understand anything that matthies wrote about the process it is to get accomodations? If so, you would understand that you can't "give" accomodation so to those people that are slow typists.


You miss my point. Under A'nold's premise, why should someone that types slower because of an actual diagnosable disability be accommodated for while someone else with an incurable inherent inability to type fast is not? Either way, both are put at a disadvantage but one is accommodated for while the other is not.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby A'nold » Sat May 15, 2010 5:27 pm

To those that keep saying that people "won't get this in the workforce": Guys, you still aren't getting the logic here. If someone that can nail a racehorse exam and just absolutely crush it, sure, they have skills that will translate to the real world. If someone like Mikey reads 1/2 as slowly, but given more time, is absolutely a better student and attorney than some dumb ass that can just read faster than him because he is disabled, he SHOULD NOT get higher grades just b/c HE is given an unfair advantage by not being freaking disabled. He sucks compared to Mikey. He is not smarter, and actually, not even as quick mentally. He can just read faster. I mean, I'd totally rather have the first guy in my office over Mikey....... :roll:

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby A'nold » Sat May 15, 2010 5:29 pm

2009 Prospective wrote:
transferornot wrote:
2009 Prospective wrote:
A'nold wrote:We are not comparing apples to apples when we are seeing who the better student is at applying law to facts in an issue spotter racehorse exam. If someone can "spot more issues" b/c the disabled person is 30 minutes "slower" but that person is way smarter than the speedster (or normal typist compared to a DISABLED person) I would way rather have the one that takes a half hour longer but is better than the one that his only talent > than the disabled person is that he thinks quicker or can type 1/2 hour faster than a disabled person that owns him in every other way. We need a more level playing field to show this guy/girl's talent. That disabled person is not a median student. They are a top of the class student, just slightly slower than a dumber person that is not disabled.


The very point of the racehorse exam is to ascertain who can spot issues quickly and efficiently and put it down on paper as cohesively as possible. This is largely what weeds out the A papers from the B- papers. As to a disabled person typing a half hour slower, what about those who are not disabled but also slow typists? Do we start accommodating for them as well? Sure, there also might be those that simply think a half hour slower. The point of a racehorse exam though is to distinguish those who can quickly move through issues from those that can't. Is it fair to accommodate for those that think slower because of a diagnosable "disability" from those that think 30 minutes slower for some other reason? You wouldn't see a high school 100m track event where runners with physical disabilities are given a 20 yard head start to accommodate for their disability. Why should it be any different here?

Giving extra time on a racehorse style exam is just too unfair. It essentially eliminates the whole purpose of such an exam. If any accommodation were to be made, I would argue in favor of a longer take-home style exam for all test takers rather than giving certain test takers special extra time.

1. Did you not understand anything that matthies wrote about the process it is to get accomodations? If so, you would understand that you can't "give" accomodation so to those people that are slow typists.


You miss my point. Under A'nold's premise, why should someone that types slower because of an actual diagnosable disability be accommodated for while someone else with an incurable inherent inability to type fast is not? Either way, both are put at a disadvantage but one is accommodated for while the other is not.


No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby 2009 Prospective » Sat May 15, 2010 5:39 pm

A'nold wrote:


No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


Typing was only one example I brought up since you mentioned it in your post and it looks like if I keep splitting hairs on that one example it probably misses the overall point. That being said, the person that "sucks" and honestly can't learn the program should be left behind while the person with the actual "disability" should not?

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby 09042014 » Sat May 15, 2010 5:41 pm

A'nold wrote:
No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


I just have shitty eye hand coordination and frequently hit the wrong key.

Why is sucking at concentrating a disability and sucking at eye hand coordination just "sucking"?

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby Matthies » Sat May 15, 2010 5:51 pm

2009 Prospective wrote:
A'nold wrote:


No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


Typing was only one example I brought up since you mentioned it in your post and it looks like if I keep splitting hairs on that one example it probably misses the overall point. That being said, the person that "sucks" and honestly can't learn the program should be left behind while the person with the actual "disability" should not?


I don't know. I can dictate faster using Dragon naturally Speaking with about 95% accuracy (you have to train it on your voice for a long time to get to that point thought) than anyone I know could type. If I could use that, or if anyone could use that at my school could, wouldn't the people who could type really fast be at a disadvantage to me? Would they be upset that because of necessity I had learned to use this software more effectively then they have, and hence are now at a disadvantage? The real issue is not so much who can type faster or not, but what inherent and uncontrolled misfiring on the brain means they can't, if typing is the standard measure, ever be as proficient as those without the inherent disability.

As to typing fast = better grades, I don't personally believe that either. I've seen people type out a bunch of useless gibberish because they can, not because its what's needed to answer the question. The hardest exams I ever had in law school were the ones with supper tight word limits, like where the hypo was 1k words and your answer had to be less than 250. That's also closer to what you will do in practice, every court I've written something for has really strict word limits. Partners even worse, they don't have time to read 3 page memos on one small issue they asked you to research.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby Matthies » Sat May 15, 2010 5:57 pm

Desert Fox wrote:
A'nold wrote:
No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


I just have shitty eye hand coordination and frequently hit the wrong key.

Why is sucking at concentrating a disability and sucking at eye hand coordination just "sucking"?


Problem solved, get a bigger keybaord

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby T14donewith1L » Sat May 15, 2010 6:08 pm

SoftBoiledLife wrote:
Desert Fox wrote:
A'nold wrote:
No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


I just have shitty eye hand coordination and frequently hit the wrong key.

Why is sucking at concentrating a disability and sucking at eye hand coordination just "sucking"?

This.

If you're so bad at focusing that you can't read a hypo and issue spot it in 3 hours like anyone else, then you're going to be a shitty attorney and should stop kidding yourself.


TITCR, if you think biglaw sweatshops are gonna cut you slack because you have trouble focusing, you are sorely mistaken. I know someone with a serious chronic Physical Illness who was forced to quit because he couldn't do the hours. Anyways, I like to think it really doesn't matter that these people get special accommodations and get better grades, because it will come back to haunt them when they aren't able to work as efficiently as fellow employees who earned their grades fairly.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Sat May 15, 2010 6:33 pm

T14donewith1L wrote:
SoftBoiledLife wrote:
Desert Fox wrote:
A'nold wrote:
No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


I just have shitty eye hand coordination and frequently hit the wrong key.

Why is sucking at concentrating a disability and sucking at eye hand coordination just "sucking"?

This.

If you're so bad at focusing that you can't read a hypo and issue spot it in 3 hours like anyone else, then you're going to be a shitty attorney and should stop kidding yourself.


TITCR, if you think biglaw sweatshops are gonna cut you slack because you have trouble focusing, you are sorely mistaken. I know someone with a serious chronic Physical Illness who was forced to quit because he couldn't do the hours. Anyways, I like to think it really doesn't matter that these people get special accommodations and get better grades, because it will come back to haunt them when they aren't able to work as efficiently as fellow employees who earned their grades fairly.

If someone has a diagnosed disability, biglaw sweatshops have a legal responsibility to accommodate them just like Burger King would. It is also unlawful for biglaw sweatshops to discriminate in hiring or retention on the basis of disability. The ABA has been telling biglaw sweatshops that they have to provide reasonable accommodations for years (why the fuck do I have to type this over and over?). Firms are slowly getting the hint.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Sat May 15, 2010 6:34 pm

Desert Fox wrote:
A'nold wrote:
No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


I just have shitty eye hand coordination and frequently hit the wrong key.

Why is sucking at concentrating a disability and sucking at eye hand coordination just "sucking"?

This is just a red herring. Typing involves no hand-eye coordination. The whole point of typing fast is not to look at the keyboard.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby transferornot » Sat May 15, 2010 6:38 pm

mikeytwoshoes wrote:
Desert Fox wrote:
A'nold wrote:
No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


I just have shitty eye hand coordination and frequently hit the wrong key.

Why is sucking at concentrating a disability and sucking at eye hand coordination just "sucking"?

This is just a red herring. Typing involves no hand-eye coordination. The whole point of typing fast is not to look at the keyboard.


hahahahaha +1 to mikeytwoshoes

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby transferornot » Sat May 15, 2010 6:41 pm

also remember.... in regards to disabilities and jobs...those people who have disabilities are considered URM (they have all these disability job fairs... from what I am reading on this thread).

What I can say: more power to those that are disabled. Having a disability is very hard. They deserve ANY and ALL accomodations that they need to excel.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Sat May 15, 2010 6:48 pm

2009 Prospective wrote:
A'nold wrote:


No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


Typing was only one example I brought up since you mentioned it in your post and it looks like if I keep splitting hairs on that one example it probably misses the overall point. That being said, the person that "sucks" and honestly can't learn the program should be left behind while the person with the actual "disability" should not?

Society decided a long time ago that disability should not limit one's potential where reasonable accommodations allow that person to succeed. If that pisses off people of normal ability, so be it.

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby LawLucy » Sat May 15, 2010 6:52 pm

I don't receive any additional time or accommodation, but I have had to deal with a serious (mercifully non-permanent) brain injury. People with disabilities succeed in spite of their challenges, not because they are given an extra hour on an exam. I'm sure they would gladly trade their extra exam time for a life free of academic struggle, and the countless extra hours spent reading and studying.[/quote]
WELL SAID!!

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Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Sat May 15, 2010 7:01 pm

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09042014
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Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 10:47 pm

Re: extra time on exams for disabilities

Postby 09042014 » Sat May 15, 2010 7:05 pm

mikeytwoshoes wrote:
Desert Fox wrote:
A'nold wrote:
No. What the hell would be an inherent disability to typing slowly? If someone is missing two fingers and has to type one handed, you bet your freaking ass that I would rather them have extra time.

There is no such thing as being disabled when it comes to typing. You can take a program. If not, maybe you just suck. That is not the case with disabilities. Horrible analogy.


I just have shitty eye hand coordination and frequently hit the wrong key.

Why is sucking at concentrating a disability and sucking at eye hand coordination just "sucking"?

This is just a red herring. Typing involves no hand-eye coordination. The whole point of typing fast is not to look at the keyboard.


Then I have poor finger control. Either way I massive suck at typing.




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