Memorizing outlines

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macattaq
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Memorizing outlines

Postby macattaq » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:14 pm

For those of you have gotten hand-me-down outlines, what has been the most effective method of memorization? Breaking it into multiple sections, and writing each section out multiple times? Practicing application? And yea, I need to memorize this thing because the exam is closed book.

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pany1985
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby pany1985 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:16 pm

The best way to memorize it is to make your own.

Since that's out of the picture... I find that I remember it better if I read it out loud.

Good luck.

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nick637
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby nick637 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:16 pm

retype that shit

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Unemployed
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby Unemployed » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:21 pm

I create a list of bullet points (each bullet point is a topic on the outline). Then I recite everything I know about each bullet point from memory, and then check my knowledge against the outline.

kevin261186
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby kevin261186 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:22 pm

tape yourself reading it and listen to it, while re-typing it.

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macattaq
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby macattaq » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:23 pm

betasteve wrote:
nick637 wrote:retype that shit


I think this is what I am going to do. Over, and over, and over.

Mr. Pablo
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby Mr. Pablo » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:28 pm

macattaq wrote:
betasteve wrote:
nick637 wrote:retype that shit


I think this is what I am going to do. Over, and over, and over.

four times. three should do it, but four for good measure.
not in school yet, but that is how I memorize anything.

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mikeytwoshoes
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby mikeytwoshoes » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:29 pm

macattaq wrote:For those of you have gotten hand-me-down outlines, what has been the most effective method of memorization? Breaking it into multiple sections, and writing each section out multiple times? Practicing application? And yea, I need to memorize this thing because the exam is closed book.

Make into checklists and memorize those. You should know the detail. Let the checklists tell you where to put it.

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A'nold
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby A'nold » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:31 pm

Mr. Pablo wrote:
macattaq wrote:
betasteve wrote:
nick637 wrote:retype that shit


I think this is what I am going to do. Over, and over, and over.

four times. three should do it, but four for good measure.
not in school yet, but that is how I memorize anything.


I vote that you officially change your name to Sir Pablo.

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RayFinkle
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby RayFinkle » Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:38 pm

When retyping, don't just copy it, but put the sentences into your own words. Hopefully that will serve a similar function to making one on your own, plus the words will flow more naturally if you memorizing your own tendencies.

Mr. Pablo
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby Mr. Pablo » Wed Apr 28, 2010 8:13 pm

I didn't know that could be done, I would consider it.

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ggocat
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby ggocat » Wed Apr 28, 2010 8:42 pm

I made my own outlines and then created virtual flash cards using powerpoint (with fade in feature). So first the slide would have the topic, then the next fade in would say how many elements/factors to the rule, then the third fade in would list the elements/factors.

Some people just wrote canned "rule statement paragraphs" over and over and over again.

270910
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby 270910 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 10:39 pm

pany1985 wrote:The best way to memorize it is to make your own.


Pretend it's not an outline, but rather a detailed set of notes. "Copy it" into your own outline. Tweak the organization slightly. Add in things you remember from class.

The more you make it your own, the better it will serve you.

BobSacamano
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby BobSacamano » Wed Apr 28, 2010 10:46 pm

I don't really make outlines. In a couple classes I'll type up notes from whatever supplement I used, then plug in some stuff from class that I think my professor stressed. I'll do this maybe a week or a few days before the exam. My "outlines" are max 10 pages, if that.

I don't know, I just don't find making extensive, 70 page outlines as the course goes on to be all that helpful. I mean, I have my class notes already. I can read those if I want.

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steve_nash
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby steve_nash » Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:09 pm

I always make my own outlines, but here's how I have memorized them in the past (emphasis on the first and second points):

1) do practice exams
2) read through the outline a few times
3) say parts of it aloud
4) write parts out by hand

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pany1985
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby pany1985 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:11 pm

BobSacamano wrote:I don't really make outlines. In a couple classes I'll type up notes from whatever supplement I used, then plug in some stuff from class that I think my professor stressed. I'll do this maybe a week or a few days before the exam. My "outlines" are max 10 pages, if that.

I don't know, I just don't find making extensive, 70 page outlines as the course goes on to be all that helpful. I mean, I have my class notes already. I can read those if I want.


My class notes aren't even 70 pages long for most courses

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chicoalto0649
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby chicoalto0649 » Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:20 pm

Mr. Pablo wrote:
macattaq wrote:
betasteve wrote:
nick637 wrote:retype that shit


I think this is what I am going to do. Over, and over, and over.

four times. three should do it, but four for good measure.
not in school yet, but that is how I memorize anything.



--ImageRemoved--

Journeybound
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby Journeybound » Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:06 am

It depends on how your mind works. But last semester I made my outlines approximately 45 pages single spaced for each class. I spent reading week making about 100-150 flash cards from each outline. The process of condensing my outline onto flash cards helped me immensely with the memorization process. Furthermore, I was able to flip through the flash cards and slowly whittle down the pile until I had everything memorized. Honestly, most of my learning took place making the outlines and the flash cards. This process helped me ace my finals. The process was extremely time consuming, and, like I said, it all depends on how your mind works.

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vanwinkle
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby vanwinkle » Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:09 am

betasteve wrote:
nick637 wrote:retype that shit

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apper123
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby apper123 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:34 am

tbh I had 2 closed book exams last semester

most of my friend memorized their outlines by retyping, reciting, note cards, etc.

i just did practice questions on every subject over and over... was a much more effective way of memorization for me. aaaand it worked really well. one of the classes (civpro) i didnt even outline.

eth3n
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby eth3n » Thu Apr 29, 2010 3:27 am

For closed book I would just suggest taking every practice question/test possible, using the info to answer questions is the best way for me to learn it.

>:-)
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby >:-) » Thu Apr 29, 2010 3:31 am

Here's an idea, if you went to a decent school you'd be able to learn in class and wouldn't need to buy cheatsheets on the internet. :roll:

macattaq wrote:For those of you have gotten hand-me-down outlines, what has been the most effective method of memorization? Breaking it into multiple sections, and writing each section out multiple times? Practicing application? And yea, I need to memorize this thing because the exam is closed book.

stinger35
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby stinger35 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:44 am

Journeybound wrote:It depends on how your mind works. But last semester I made my outlines approximately 45 pages single spaced for each class. I spent reading week making about 100-150 flash cards from each outline. The process of condensing my outline onto flash cards helped me immensely with the memorization process. Furthermore, I was able to flip through the flash cards and slowly whittle down the pile until I had everything memorized. Honestly, most of my learning took place making the outlines and the flash cards. This process helped me ace my finals. The process was extremely time consuming, and, like I said, it all depends on how your mind works.


Thats almost exactly what I did for torts and got the highest grade in the class. However, I didn't do it for K's and did just as well. Still, I am currently doing it for CivPro and find its def. helping, especially with certain little nuances or doctrinal points from cases.

I condensed my civpro outline into like 10 pages (single space, huge doc margins, paragraphs instead of bullet points) and feel it has everything on it - am i crazy?

GZL
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby GZL » Thu Apr 29, 2010 6:36 pm

macattaq wrote:For those of you have gotten hand-me-down outlines, what has been the most effective method of memorization? Breaking it into multiple sections, and writing each section out multiple times? Practicing application? And yea, I need to memorize this thing because the exam is closed book.


I know this is the exact opposite of helpful, but I used a hand me down outline for the first time for a test I took yesterday. I am never doing it again. It's the one test I am sure I won't do well one. The best way, for me anyway, to memorize an outline is for the outline to be mine, and that usually takes care of a good part of the application bit as well: I'm thinking through how it's applied as I make it.

As for what works for memorization, sort of depends on your learning style. For me, mnemonics and the like don't work. Memorizing a single fundamental, authoritative definition which keys concepts that arise from it works better, for me. Just as a semi-detailed example to show what I'm talking about, I remember for contracts and the PER I used the restatement's definition of an integrated agreement, and combined it with the restatement definition of a completely integrated agreement.

"An integrated agreement is a writing or writings constituting a final expression of one or more terms of an agreement. A completely integrated agreement is an integrated agreement adopted by the parties as a complete and exclusive statement of the terms of the agreement."

"writing or writings" tells me that written contemporaneous (ancillary) agreements are likely to be seen as part of the integrated agreement.
"final expression" tells me the entire thrust of the PER: the integrated agreement discharges prior agreements, and so evidence of them is barred if inconsistent with the integrated agreement.
"complete and exclusive" tells me that evidence even of consistent additional terms arising from prior agreements is barred in the case of a completely integrated agreement.

The 'exceptions' aren't really exceptions, looking at the definition of an integrated agreement: of course parol evidence is admissible to establish whether or not an agreement is integrated, or completely or partially integrated because the PER doesn't even apply until you have a finding that a writing or writings is the "final expression" of an agreement, and how it applies can't be determined until you have a finding regarding its complete('exclusive') or partial integration. Evidence of collateral agreements isn't an exception, because they are really independent K's (possibly conditioned on the performance of the written agreement or some such) supported by separate consideration, and not part of the agreement the integrated agreement is a 'final expression' of. The formation-defect exceptions aren't really evidence of previous agreements regarding the same subject, but evidence of a defect in the integrated agreement, so the "final"ity of that agreement is irrelevant. Same goes with evidence to establish the meaning of a term determined to be ambiguous, etc. etc.

I can usually find a definition of some fundamental concept in an area that works to tell me what I need to know, or remind me of what I need to know.

GZL
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Re: Memorizing outlines

Postby GZL » Thu Apr 29, 2010 6:41 pm

Journeybound wrote:It depends on how your mind works. But last semester I made my outlines approximately 45 pages single spaced for each class. I spent reading week making about 100-150 flash cards from each outline. The process of condensing my outline onto flash cards helped me immensely with the memorization process. Furthermore, I was able to flip through the flash cards and slowly whittle down the pile until I had everything memorized. Honestly, most of my learning took place making the outlines and the flash cards. This process helped me ace my finals. The process was extremely time consuming, and, like I said, it all depends on how your mind works.


This is pretty much exactly what I did, and I agree... for me the important part of the outline sn't the finished product, it's the process of making it: I'm learning and thinking through how everything applies and fits together as I make it. The flashcards (for me, the bulk of which are definitions of key concepts) help me maintain, remember what I learned in that process.




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