Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

A forum for those current students who are or may be transferring from one school to another. Post any questions, advice, or other transfer related comments here.
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ncs2518
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:56 am

Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby ncs2518 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 5:28 am

I just wanted to see if anyone has prior knowledge about the transferring process. I am looking to transfer law schools this summer. I am currently a 1L at a T-4 law-school in California. I was ranked in the top 7% of my class when grades were released. I was looking to transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine. (Also may send applications to USC, UCLA, Davis, Notre Dame, Florida State and Fordham). I really like where I'm at, but I want to be a sports agent and I'm not sure my school can open enough doors in that field.

Anyway, I would appreciate any information that anyone has on the process.

Thanks for your time.

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XxSpyKEx
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Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:48 am

Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby XxSpyKEx » Mon Feb 07, 2011 5:41 am

Aim higher than Loyola or Pepperdine. I think you'll get some bites in the t30 range. However, also consider where you want to be after graduation because all of these schools are regional.

ncs2518
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:56 am

Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby ncs2518 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:56 pm

Thanks for the advice. What schools would you consider not to be regional.

slotwide
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 3:12 am

Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby slotwide » Mon Feb 07, 2011 5:01 pm

Typically only T14 schools are considered to be national law schools, any other school is essentially regional with the exception of perhaps Texas, Vanderbilt, UCLA.

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patrickd139
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Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby patrickd139 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 5:43 pm

slotwide wrote:Typically only T14 schools are considered to be national law schools, any other school is essentially regional with the exception of perhaps Texas, Vanderbilt, UCLA.

In one sentence, 'slotwide' pretty much sums it up.

To elaborate a little bit, the national job prospects of a school can probably be better depicted a sliding scale than as a bright line. The argument could be made that Texas, Vandy and UCLA are still regional schools, but whose regional pull extends to vast areas of the country.

For example: UCLA's "region" arguably covers from California to as far east as maybe West Texas and straight up to Montana, with minimal placement as far as the East Coast. Texas's "region" probably covers most of the Southwest (from New Mexico to Missouri to probably Mississippi). Vandy's "region" overlaps with Texas's, but probably extends from Chicago to Dallas to most of the midwest.

Contrast those three schools with a school like the University of Oklahoma. A small percentage of our grads (think ~5%) leave the state for Dallas (only 200 miles away), Arkansas or Kansas, but that's about as far as the "region" goes. Through self-selection or lack of prospects most graduates stay within the state of Oklahoma, where it places very well.

On the farthest end of the spectrum is a school like University of Tulsa or Oklahoma City University, whose "regions" extend probably no further than the school's respective city limits and surrounding large-ish towns.

An alternative way to define a school's "region" might be to examine what job opportunities are available to the school's best students (assume number high class rank, editorial board of LR and stellar personality/interview skills for this example). In this case, the top 5 students or so at UCLA could probably go anywhere in the country. The top 5 students or so at (say) Chapman probably could get most jobs in the state, but would be foreclosed from clerking at the 9th Circuit level, and would be hard pressed to land biglaw in Seattle or Denver--unlike a top 5 Pepperdine grad, who would likely have no problems with either.

ncs2518
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:56 am

Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby ncs2518 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 9:20 pm

Thanks for the info on how location is so important.

Does anybody know the best schools for sports agents. Like I said, I am in the top 7% at a T-4 in SoCal, so if Harvard has a great sport law program it probably won't help my case. Schools outside the Top 14 are more in my ballpark.

I would love to transfer to a Notre Dame or USC type school. May be a long shot, but hopefully I can get into the top 5% this semester and give myself at least an outside chance.

I know soft don't mean much, but I'm a prior U.S. Marine (Captain). Anyone know if anyone (such as Northwestern) likes work experience.

Thanks.

jarofsoup
Posts: 1952
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 2:41 am

Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby jarofsoup » Mon Feb 07, 2011 9:26 pm

I would apply to almost the entire top 14 especially Northwestern, UVA, and GULC

keg411
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Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 9:10 pm

Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby keg411 » Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:51 pm

jarofsoup wrote:I would apply to almost the entire top 14 especially Northwestern, UVA, and GULC


UVA pretty much only takes VA residents as transfers. OP should focus on schools like USC, UCLA and Berkeley (along w/Loyola and Pepperdine as safeties), since it appears OP wants to be in California.

bigmnstyle
Posts: 195
Joined: Sun Sep 27, 2009 10:28 pm

Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby bigmnstyle » Mon Apr 04, 2011 1:25 am

I agree w/ above except I don't know if I would even bother applying to Pepperdine or Loyola. I think you have a great shot at UCLA and if not--maybe shoot for Hastings or Davis. If you want to go into sports law... UCLA, USC, Hastings, Davis, Loyola, Pepperdine in that order IMO.

I would choose Loyola over Pepperdine if you can't manage to get into the other schools. Esp. for sports law. Loyola has a very big alumni base and is in a better spot to get an agent job in Los Angeles... (these jobs are tough to get but good luck!)

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Pleasye
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Re: Transfer to Loyola or Pepperdine

Postby Pleasye » Mon Apr 04, 2011 1:46 am

patrickd139 wrote:
slotwide wrote:Typically only T14 schools are considered to be national law schools, any other school is essentially regional with the exception of perhaps Texas, Vanderbilt, UCLA.

In one sentence, 'slotwide' pretty much sums it up.

To elaborate a little bit, the national job prospects of a school can probably be better depicted a sliding scale than as a bright line. The argument could be made that Texas, Vandy and UCLA are still regional schools, but whose regional pull extends to vast areas of the country.

For example: UCLA's "region" arguably covers from California to as far east as maybe West Texas and straight up to Montana, with minimal placement as far as the East Coast. Texas's "region" probably covers most of the Southwest (from New Mexico to Missouri to probably Mississippi). Vandy's "region" overlaps with Texas's, but probably extends from Chicago to Dallas to most of the midwest.

Contrast those three schools with a school like the University of Oklahoma. A small percentage of our grads (think ~5%) leave the state for Dallas (only 200 miles away), Arkansas or Kansas, but that's about as far as the "region" goes. Through self-selection or lack of prospects most graduates stay within the state of Oklahoma, where it places very well.

On the farthest end of the spectrum is a school like University of Tulsa or Oklahoma City University, whose "regions" extend probably no further than the school's respective city limits and surrounding large-ish towns.

An alternative way to define a school's "region" might be to examine what job opportunities are available to the school's best students (assume number high class rank, editorial board of LR and stellar personality/interview skills for this example). In this case, the top 5 students or so at UCLA could probably go anywhere in the country. The top 5 students or so at (say) Chapman probably could get most jobs in the state, but would be foreclosed from clerking at the 9th Circuit level, and would be hard pressed to land biglaw in Seattle or Denver--unlike a top 5 Pepperdine grad, who would likely have no problems with either.

Great post. This is a really good explanation.




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