TY notes

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Are you sending post-callback thank you notes?

Yes, to everybody I met with
18
60%
Yes, but just to the recruiter
3
10%
No
9
30%
 
Total votes: 30

gollymolly
Posts: 127
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2007 2:32 pm

TY notes

Postby gollymolly » Sun Sep 20, 2009 8:06 pm

.
Last edited by gollymolly on Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

LawSchoolWannaBe
Posts: 212
Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2007 12:57 am

Re: TY notes

Postby LawSchoolWannaBe » Sun Sep 20, 2009 8:17 pm

I write a short thank you to everyone. Only a few sentences thanking them for their time and mentioning something specific we talked about. Nothing major.

User avatar
Wahoo1L
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 6:35 am

Re: TY notes

Postby Wahoo1L » Mon Sep 21, 2009 12:41 am

I wrote out thank you notes for two firms I interviewed with but decided not to send them (I had them ready to go and even addressed the envelopes for the first firm).

My thought was that a thank you note won't turn a lousy evaluation into a good evaluation, and it might hurt you if either (a) you misspell a person's name/make a grammatical mistake, or (b) they sound too similar. Not really sure if it hurt me.

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: TY notes

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Sep 21, 2009 9:24 am

emails or handwritten?

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: TY notes

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Sep 21, 2009 10:25 am

I did not do it when I went through OCI and it did not hurt me. I think it depends on the firm though. Some firms like it, some are indifferent, and as someone pointed out they can hurt you if you misspell, etc.

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Merrill
Posts: 135
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 3:28 pm

Re: TY notes

Postby Merrill » Mon Sep 21, 2009 11:37 am

Email, day of interview, to everyone, including the recruiting coordinator. Yes misspelling or other mistakes can probably hurt, but that's what proofreading is for. Handwritten or typed and snail-mailed might be more personal, but you have to get to them before they've written out their evaluation of you. Of course, don't send them the minute you get home from the interview--that looks a little creepy.

My guess is that most correspondence from candidates gets put into their file, and the file is pulled when the hiring committee meets. Thank you emails can help remind the decision-makers who you are and what you talked about. Just make sure something specific about your conversation is in each email.

Also, some people say to use the thank you letter to plug your skills again ("I think my experience in the DoJ gives me the skills to do x firm's white collar work" or something), but I don't bother. If you've got a callback, your skills make you qualified to work there. They're looking for fit.

I think that especially with older partners a thank you note can go a long way. One of the previous generation's complaints about Gen Y (or whatever we are) is that we have an unearned sense of entitlement, that the world owes us a good job and a good life. Whether or not this is true, a thank you note shows some humility, which I think at least the older interviewers appreciate.

Plus, as my mom would say, being polite never killed anyone. These are busy people who took time out of their day to talk to you. Sure, it's part of their job, but it's nice to acknowledge that you appreciate their time.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273108
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: TY notes

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Sep 21, 2009 7:17 pm

Merrill wrote:Email, day of interview, to everyone, including the recruiting coordinator. Yes misspelling or other mistakes can probably hurt, but that's what proofreading is for. Handwritten or typed and snail-mailed might be more personal, but you have to get to them before they've written out their evaluation of you. Of course, don't send them the minute you get home from the interview--that looks a little creepy.

My guess is that most correspondence from candidates gets put into their file, and the file is pulled when the hiring committee meets. Thank you emails can help remind the decision-makers who you are and what you talked about. Just make sure something specific about your conversation is in each email.

Also, some people say to use the thank you letter to plug your skills again ("I think my experience in the DoJ gives me the skills to do x firm's white collar work" or something), but I don't bother. If you've got a callback, your skills make you qualified to work there. They're looking for fit.

I think that especially with older partners a thank you note can go a long way. One of the previous generation's complaints about Gen Y (or whatever we are) is that we have an unearned sense of entitlement, that the world owes us a good job and a good life. Whether or not this is true, a thank you note shows some humility, which I think at least the older interviewers appreciate.

Plus, as my mom would say, being polite never killed anyone. These are busy people who took time out of their day to talk to you. Sure, it's part of their job, but it's nice to acknowledge that you appreciate their time.


I know sooner is better, but I've sent them (emails) up to 6 days after the interview and gotten lengthy positive responses back the same day or even up to two weeks later. I think putting a little space between the interview and the thank you may work to one's advantage in that it reminds the interviewer of you once they've seen a few others and the group has started to blur together. The point about hitting them before they write their evaluation is a good one, though.




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