Military Law

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Sat May 26, 2018 9:54 pm

Hello everyone,

Brand new to the forum, I have read so many of the pages for this thread and have been so enthusiastic about my pursuit of become a JAG that I did not even consider that I may already be disqualified. It just sprung back into my memory and a near panic attack ensued. I had a dwai conviction in 2012. Long story short I was living out of my truck at the time, after a landlord up and sold the property from under me and gave me 7 days notice to vacate. I was 21 in undergrad and completely alone, 1000miles away from family. so it was an extremely rough time. I took the plea owned up to my mistake and had my probation terminated in 6 months rather than the 1 year. I am now furious with myself because I am worried that I know have a snowballs chance in hell of becoming a JAG. Are my fears justified? is there a chance? even a small one?

I know it might be an extreme up hill battle to get into the program but I am about to begin my 1l and will bust all ass to be the best possible candidate. I know all of you in this board possess a wealth of knowledge and I need to know. I have had my site focused on this goal for years and years and never even considered that it would play a factor and now I am stressing out.

If i cannot become a JAG, can I at least become an officer in one of the branches and prove myself that way to then be entered into consideration?

All advice or input is massively appreciated

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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Mon May 28, 2018 11:30 am

Anonymous User wrote:Hello everyone,

Brand new to the forum, I have read so many of the pages for this thread and have been so enthusiastic about my pursuit of become a JAG that I did not even consider that I may already be disqualified. It just sprung back into my memory and a near panic attack ensued. I had a dwai conviction in 2012. Long story short I was living out of my truck at the time, after a landlord up and sold the property from under me and gave me 7 days notice to vacate. I was 21 in undergrad and completely alone, 1000miles away from family. so it was an extremely rough time. I took the plea owned up to my mistake and had my probation terminated in 6 months rather than the 1 year. I am now furious with myself because I am worried that I know have a snowballs chance in hell of becoming a JAG. Are my fears justified? is there a chance? even a small one?

I know it might be an extreme up hill battle to get into the program but I am about to begin my 1l and will bust all ass to be the best possible candidate. I know all of you in this board possess a wealth of knowledge and I need to know. I have had my site focused on this goal for years and years and never even considered that it would play a factor and now I am stressing out.

If i cannot become a JAG, can I at least become an officer in one of the branches and prove myself that way to then be entered into consideration?

All advice or input is massively appreciated


My opinion is that yes, you still have a chance. The prior conviction is obviously not great but based on your description, there is quite a bit of mitigation given the circumstances, as well as no aggravating factors. I think that the fact that it is also relatively remote in time, versus something that happened in law school, will help.

It probably goes without saying but the better you look on paper as an applicant, the easier it may be for an accessions board to look past it. So all the standard things like grades, journal, summer positions will matter even more. I would also start giving some real thought on the best way to explain the situation in both writing and in an interview - I think the way your characterized it for your post is the appropriate one: a bad lapse in judgment when you were younger, due in part to some truly difficult circumstances, from which you have learned a valuable lesson, and, most importantly, that you have not repeated.

I would also have a legal career Plan B. You should also be considering the private sector or civilian government service, just as a matter of hedging your bets.

While I appreciate your desire to serve, I'm not sure the "serve as a non-JA officer" alternate plan is good or realistic. You would have to come in through OCS/OTS and that is no small feat- you would also be running into the same issue of the selection board having to look past you prior issue. Even if selected - what is the end game here? You are now a O-1 in some non-legal career field, with a JD that is doing you no good.

As an aside, I would look into getting that conviction expunged. Depending on the jurisdiction, that may or may not be an easy thing to do, but I would advise doing it if you can.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Wed May 30, 2018 6:13 pm

I'm an intern at a USAF JAG base this summer, and I just wanted to chime in with an update after week 1 for future interns. I know we have a lot of ex-JAG and current JAG here, but I thought this different perspective might be useful.

My office has a Colonel, Major, 5 Captains, and 2 1st Lieutenants. For the most part, we do everything but operational law (with a few exceptions). We have civilians as our chiefs of labor, environmental law, and a few others. Despite every captain being a "chief" of something, nobody seems to really be specialized. When we have a court-marshall (have two this week), it's all hands on deck. Preparing for these courts have been pretty fun with one big caveat. I have NOT been able to do a lot of real legal work, because getting computer access takes FOREVER. I filled out my paperwork before I got to base, and I was told it'd take 2-3 weeks more at least. Still, I've sat in on motions, trial practice presentations, half a dozen witness interviews, law enforcement, sexual assault, and several other meetings. It's been incredibly interesting. I do read a lot of the documents, which the JAGs are kind enough to print off for me, but we didn't figure out a quasi-work-around until yesterday to let me do some real legal research via Lexis without DoD computer access. The one topic of legal research I've done has been really fun; it was working on an answer to a motion to suppress evidence. I haven't taken evidence, so it was cool to learn some new law and just read cases in a real, non- legal writing setting. All this being said, I've had periods of very high activity and then a lot of droughts where I've had to pick up random AF leadership books and the Uniform Code of Military Justice that were laying around the office to escape complete boredom.

Overall, it's been a very good experience, especially after HATING 1L and having literally zero prior experience with military (no family members or friends have ever served either). I'm not a big fan of how much of a generalist everyone is, and so I might consider the Navy JAG more heavily where I have been told you can specialize much more quickly, but otherwise my co-workers are fun as hell and really chill people, the work is fun, and quality of life is high. At my base, a lot of JAGs can work quite late (frequently to 6-7 PM and as late as 9 PM with trials upcoming), but there are a good few that clock out at 5 or 5:30 if they don't have much on their plate. Even the ones who leave late seem to be pretty happy though. Based on the work I've gotten to do so far/witness (sexual assault, drug use, child pornography), I have a feeling that for most (and have been told by some) that clock out late it's one of those "damn I worked a lot and hard today, but the work was fun (or at least not bad) and I made some progress."

Anyway, I'm just throwing this together right after I got off work and didn't proof read, so I apologize if anything I wrote is a bit confusing. Feel free to ask clarification questions.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 31, 2018 8:16 am

Anonymous User wrote:I'm an intern at a USAF JAG base this summer, and I just wanted to chime in with an update after week 1 for future interns. I know we have a lot of ex-JAG and current JAG here, but I thought this different perspective might be useful.

My office has a Colonel, Major, 5 Captains, and 2 1st Lieutenants. For the most part, we do everything but operational law (with a few exceptions). We have civilians as our chiefs of labor, environmental law, and a few others. Despite every captain being a "chief" of something, nobody seems to really be specialized. When we have a court-marshall (have two this week), it's all hands on deck. Preparing for these courts have been pretty fun with one big caveat. I have NOT been able to do a lot of real legal work, because getting computer access takes FOREVER. I filled out my paperwork before I got to base, and I was told it'd take 2-3 weeks more at least. Still, I've sat in on motions, trial practice presentations, half a dozen witness interviews, law enforcement, sexual assault, and several other meetings. It's been incredibly interesting. I do read a lot of the documents, which the JAGs are kind enough to print off for me, but we didn't figure out a quasi-work-around until yesterday to let me do some real legal research via Lexis without DoD computer access. The one topic of legal research I've done has been really fun; it was working on an answer to a motion to suppress evidence. I haven't taken evidence, so it was cool to learn some new law and just read cases in a real, non- legal writing setting. All this being said, I've had periods of very high activity and then a lot of droughts where I've had to pick up random AF leadership books and the Uniform Code of Military Justice that were laying around the office to escape complete boredom.

Overall, it's been a very good experience, especially after HATING 1L and having literally zero prior experience with military (no family members or friends have ever served either). I'm not a big fan of how much of a generalist everyone is, and so I might consider the Navy JAG more heavily where I have been told you can specialize much more quickly, but otherwise my co-workers are fun as hell and really chill people, the work is fun, and quality of life is high. At my base, a lot of JAGs can work quite late (frequently to 6-7 PM and as late as 9 PM with trials upcoming), but there are a good few that clock out at 5 or 5:30 if they don't have much on their plate. Even the ones who leave late seem to be pretty happy though. Based on the work I've gotten to do so far/witness (sexual assault, drug use, child pornography), I have a feeling that for most (and have been told by some) that clock out late it's one of those "damn I worked a lot and hard today, but the work was fun (or at least not bad) and I made some progress."

Anyway, I'm just throwing this together right after I got off work and didn't proof read, so I apologize if anything I wrote is a bit confusing. Feel free to ask clarification questions.


Maybe spell court-martial right for the rest of the week. It is a fun job and you learn a ton right away. As for the generalist part, yes first assignment you will be. Second assignment can be all defense then go to circuit trial counsel. So you can position yourself for straight litigation for 6 years or so. You can even get an LLM. But the longer you stay in, the more well rounded you will have to become.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu May 31, 2018 9:28 am

Anonymous User wrote: Maybe spell court-martial right for the rest of the week.


Zing.

Also important to avoid the infamous "court-marital." Spell check will not save you there. And while I am in pedant mode, also keep in mind the plural is courts-martial due to the postpositive adjective. Same goes for Judge Advocates General, etc.

Other hills I am prepared to die upon: initialism v. acronym and lectern v. podium.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 31, 2018 11:51 pm

I clearly wrote my post saying that I didn't review anything. I pretty much never stopped typing and then clicked submit. The pedantry is noted but also kinda condescending and not appreciated. I know how to properly spell court-martial and its plural courts-martial. Kinda killed my mood to keep updating with my intern posts.

I know I'm being petty, but your posts just did not vibe well with me at all, especially when I'm clearly new to this.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:34 am

Anonymous User wrote:I'm an intern at a USAF JAG base this summer, and I just wanted to chime in with an update after week 1 for future interns. I know we have a lot of ex-JAG and current JAG here, but I thought this different perspective might be useful.

My office has a Colonel, Major, 5 Captains, and 2 1st Lieutenants. For the most part, we do everything but operational law (with a few exceptions). We have civilians as our chiefs of labor, environmental law, and a few others. Despite every captain being a "chief" of something, nobody seems to really be specialized. When we have a court-marshall (have two this week), it's all hands on deck. Preparing for these courts have been pretty fun with one big caveat. I have NOT been able to do a lot of real legal work, because getting computer access takes FOREVER. I filled out my paperwork before I got to base, and I was told it'd take 2-3 weeks more at least. Still, I've sat in on motions, trial practice presentations, half a dozen witness interviews, law enforcement, sexual assault, and several other meetings. It's been incredibly interesting. I do read a lot of the documents, which the JAGs are kind enough to print off for me, but we didn't figure out a quasi-work-around until yesterday to let me do some real legal research via Lexis without DoD computer access. The one topic of legal research I've done has been really fun; it was working on an answer to a motion to suppress evidence. I haven't taken evidence, so it was cool to learn some new law and just read cases in a real, non- legal writing setting. All this being said, I've had periods of very high activity and then a lot of droughts where I've had to pick up random AF leadership books and the Uniform Code of Military Justice that were laying around the office to escape complete boredom.

Overall, it's been a very good experience, especially after HATING 1L and having literally zero prior experience with military (no family members or friends have ever served either). I'm not a big fan of how much of a generalist everyone is, and so I might consider the Navy JAG more heavily where I have been told you can specialize much more quickly, but otherwise my co-workers are fun as hell and really chill people, the work is fun, and quality of life is high. At my base, a lot of JAGs can work quite late (frequently to 6-7 PM and as late as 9 PM with trials upcoming), but there are a good few that clock out at 5 or 5:30 if they don't have much on their plate. Even the ones who leave late seem to be pretty happy though. Based on the work I've gotten to do so far/witness (sexual assault, drug use, child pornography), I have a feeling that for most (and have been told by some) that clock out late it's one of those "damn I worked a lot and hard today, but the work was fun (or at least not bad) and I made some progress."

Anyway, I'm just throwing this together right after I got off work and didn't proof read, so I apologize if anything I wrote is a bit confusing. Feel free to ask clarification questions.



Thanks for posting! I am considering an internship with AF next summer so I found this very helpful!

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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:58 am

Anonymous User wrote:I clearly wrote my post saying that I didn't review anything. I pretty much never stopped typing and then clicked submit. The pedantry is noted but also kinda condescending and not appreciated. I know how to properly spell court-martial and its plural courts-martial. Kinda killed my mood to keep updating with my intern posts.

I know I'm being petty, but your posts just did not vibe well with me at all, especially when I'm clearly new to this.


While I cannot speak for the Anon poster above me, I can assure you it is all meant in good fun. We are not seriously giving you a grammatical critique.

To quote the famous Army drill instructor, Sergeant First Class Hulka: "Lighten up Francis."

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:10 am

Got medically DQ'ed. Best of luck to everyone else.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:15 am

Anonymous User wrote:Got medically DQ'ed. Best of luck to everyone else.


For which service? I do know some people received waivers or were deferred to other classes until medical issues (overweight, tests were off etc.) were cleared up.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:52 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Got medically DQ'ed. Best of luck to everyone else.


For which service? I do know some people received waivers or were deferred to other classes until medical issues (overweight, tests were off etc.) were cleared up.


Army. Could you PM me? Don't want to out myself by specifying condition.

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Re: Military Law

Postby annon1234 » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:59 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Got medically DQ'ed. Best of luck to everyone else.


For which service? I do know some people received waivers or were deferred to other classes until medical issues (overweight, tests were off etc.) were cleared up.


Army. Could you PM me? Don't want to out myself by specifying condition.


Umm...not sure how to do that since your anonymous. You can pm me though.

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Patrick Bateman

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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:05 am

annon1234 wrote: Umm...not sure how to do that since your anonymous. You can pm me though.


I'm pretty sure the PM feature was removed when TLS came under new management.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:39 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Got medically DQ'ed. Best of luck to everyone else.


For which service? I do know some people received waivers or were deferred to other classes until medical issues (overweight, tests were off etc.) were cleared up.


Army. Could you PM me? Don't want to out myself by specifying condition.


Not to be in your business, but one of the issues that they seem to waive is weight. I was over, but in great physical shape. I dropped the weight, though, by the time (got a trainer and ate very clean-no sugar, no alcohol, little carbs) I did my medical as I didn't want any issues. Running drops a lot of weight quickly. I know there is an option of a measurements test as a lot of people don't met the weight requirements. Measurements are a good indication of physical fitness as much as weight is.

I don't know about other specific medical issues beyond that. I'm sure there are waivers for other things that a recruiter or maybe someone on this board would know. I'd contact JAG to see what can be done if you really want the position. Good luck.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:52 am

Patrick Bateman wrote:
annon1234 wrote: Umm...not sure how to do that since your anonymous. You can pm me though.


I'm pretty sure the PM feature was removed when TLS came under new management.


That sucks. Thanks for the info, though.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 10:54 am

Anonymous User wrote:I'm an intern at a USAF JAG base this summer, and I just wanted to chime in with an update after week 1 for future interns. I know we have a lot of ex-JAG and current JAG here, but I thought this different perspective might be useful.

My office has a Colonel, Major, 5 Captains, and 2 1st Lieutenants. For the most part, we do everything but operational law (with a few exceptions). We have civilians as our chiefs of labor, environmental law, and a few others. Despite every captain being a "chief" of something, nobody seems to really be specialized. When we have a court-marshall (have two this week), it's all hands on deck. Preparing for these courts have been pretty fun with one big caveat. I have NOT been able to do a lot of real legal work, because getting computer access takes FOREVER. I filled out my paperwork before I got to base, and I was told it'd take 2-3 weeks more at least. Still, I've sat in on motions, trial practice presentations, half a dozen witness interviews, law enforcement, sexual assault, and several other meetings. It's been incredibly interesting. I do read a lot of the documents, which the JAGs are kind enough to print off for me, but we didn't figure out a quasi-work-around until yesterday to let me do some real legal research via Lexis without DoD computer access. The one topic of legal research I've done has been really fun; it was working on an answer to a motion to suppress evidence. I haven't taken evidence, so it was cool to learn some new law and just read cases in a real, non- legal writing setting. All this being said, I've had periods of very high activity and then a lot of droughts where I've had to pick up random AF leadership books and the Uniform Code of Military Justice that were laying around the office to escape complete boredom.

Overall, it's been a very good experience, especially after HATING 1L and having literally zero prior experience with military (no family members or friends have ever served either). I'm not a big fan of how much of a generalist everyone is, and so I might consider the Navy JAG more heavily where I have been told you can specialize much more quickly, but otherwise my co-workers are fun as hell and really chill people, the work is fun, and quality of life is high. At my base, a lot of JAGs can work quite late (frequently to 6-7 PM and as late as 9 PM with trials upcoming), but there are a good few that clock out at 5 or 5:30 if they don't have much on their plate. Even the ones who leave late seem to be pretty happy though. Based on the work I've gotten to do so far/witness (sexual assault, drug use, child pornography), I have a feeling that for most (and have been told by some) that clock out late it's one of those "damn I worked a lot and hard today, but the work was fun (or at least not bad) and I made some progress."

Anyway, I'm just throwing this together right after I got off work and didn't proof read, so I apologize if anything I wrote is a bit confusing. Feel free to ask clarification questions.


Congrats on your internship! Are the interns also required to do PT as well?

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:12 am

DQ'ed poster from before. It was for learning disorder. Had accommodations K-JD, but never needed accommodations at work. Do not need medications. All the regs I found seem to disqualify me.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 11:19 am

Anonymous User wrote:DQ'ed poster from before. It was for learning disorder. Had accommodations K-JD, but never needed accommodations at work. Do not need medications. All the regs I found seem to disqualify me.


Ok, sorry to hear about the DQ, but I would check with the military office to see if there are other options as they are the experts. Best of luck!

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jun 01, 2018 4:21 pm

Army Reserve Selectee here, I was also disqualified but for an eye issue but I contacted the JARO medical sergeant and he submitted my case up for review by the Command Surgeon to see if I qualify for a waiver. I highly recommend you do the same, if anything the worst they can say at this point is no, but there is always the chance you get one.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Houzy » Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:55 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I'm an intern at a USAF JAG base this summer, and I just wanted to chime in with an update after week 1 for future interns. I know we have a lot of ex-JAG and current JAG here, but I thought this different perspective might be useful.

My office has a Colonel, Major, 5 Captains, and 2 1st Lieutenants. For the most part, we do everything but operational law (with a few exceptions). We have civilians as our chiefs of labor, environmental law, and a few others. Despite every captain being a "chief" of something, nobody seems to really be specialized. When we have a court-marshall (have two this week), it's all hands on deck. Preparing for these courts have been pretty fun with one big caveat. I have NOT been able to do a lot of real legal work, because getting computer access takes FOREVER. I filled out my paperwork before I got to base, and I was told it'd take 2-3 weeks more at least. Still, I've sat in on motions, trial practice presentations, half a dozen witness interviews, law enforcement, sexual assault, and several other meetings. It's been incredibly interesting. I do read a lot of the documents, which the JAGs are kind enough to print off for me, but we didn't figure out a quasi-work-around until yesterday to let me do some real legal research via Lexis without DoD computer access. The one topic of legal research I've done has been really fun; it was working on an answer to a motion to suppress evidence. I haven't taken evidence, so it was cool to learn some new law and just read cases in a real, non- legal writing setting. All this being said, I've had periods of very high activity and then a lot of droughts where I've had to pick up random AF leadership books and the Uniform Code of Military Justice that were laying around the office to escape complete boredom.

Overall, it's been a very good experience, especially after HATING 1L and having literally zero prior experience with military (no family members or friends have ever served either). I'm not a big fan of how much of a generalist everyone is, and so I might consider the Navy JAG more heavily where I have been told you can specialize much more quickly, but otherwise my co-workers are fun as hell and really chill people, the work is fun, and quality of life is high. At my base, a lot of JAGs can work quite late (frequently to 6-7 PM and as late as 9 PM with trials upcoming), but there are a good few that clock out at 5 or 5:30 if they don't have much on their plate. Even the ones who leave late seem to be pretty happy though. Based on the work I've gotten to do so far/witness (sexual assault, drug use, child pornography), I have a feeling that for most (and have been told by some) that clock out late it's one of those "damn I worked a lot and hard today, but the work was fun (or at least not bad) and I made some progress."

Anyway, I'm just throwing this together right after I got off work and didn't proof read, so I apologize if anything I wrote is a bit confusing. Feel free to ask clarification questions.


Congrats on your internship! Are the interns also required to do PT as well?


Not original OP but also doing an internship. At the base I'm at, it is entirely optional for me to PT. That being said, if you're serious about the Air Force and want to leave a good, lasting impression, then you absolutely should make every effort to attend PT. Just my $0.02.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Esquire » Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:15 pm

If you are an Army intern who doesn't PT with everyone in the morning, you're highly likely to get dinged when applying for a permanent position. No, you certainly don't have to PT as an intern, but it's part of the actual job.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:04 pm

Any Army JAG guys know what JAGs do in the national guard? I can't imagine a lot of work gets done when you're just drilling one weekend a month

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jun 03, 2018 4:20 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Any Army JAG guys know what JAGs do in the national guard? I can't imagine a lot of work gets done when you're just drilling one weekend a month


Not a JAG, but work next door to them and know them well. They really don't do much at all. The most I have ever seen them work is during SRP/mobilization prep when they are signing off on packets and making sure people have wills/POAs. Most of the time they just sit there and BS.

That is not to say they are lazy. They are very hard workers that I know professionally as well (I am a current attorney and in the NG, just not as a JAG). Most of the heavy lifting is done by the one or two full time JAGs.

There are opportunities for deployments or to participate in exercises. Each BDE command post has a JAG who will work with the staff during MDMP and operations, mainly as an ROE advisor. Good way to get in on some more exciting stuff.

This is just my perspective, others who are actually NG JAGs will probably have a different viewpoint. :D

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:04 pm

Has anyone gone from biglaw or clerkship --> JAG? I considered JAG in law school but thought the biglaw money/prestige was something I should at lest take a shot at. I also got clerkship (state supreme court) for my second year out of school in case I disliked biglaw and wanted to hit the reset button. Not surprisingly, I don't think biglaw is for me long-term. My situation isn't bad but I think I'd rather do something with better hours and more variety than corp lit.

Don't really have specific questions right now--just trying to get a general sense of how JAGs look at former biglawyers/clerks. I think I have a genuine, fairly convincing narrative for wanting to join. I'm most interested in AF and Navy, in case that makes a difference.

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Re: Military Law

Postby USMC Hopeful » Sun Jun 03, 2018 8:38 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Has anyone gone from biglaw or clerkship --> JAG? I considered JAG in law school but thought the biglaw money/prestige was something I should at lest take a shot at. I also got clerkship (state supreme court) for my second year out of school in case I disliked biglaw and wanted to hit the reset button. Not surprisingly, I don't think biglaw is for me long-term. My situation isn't bad but I think I'd rather do something with better hours and more variety than corp lit.

Don't really have specific questions right now--just trying to get a general sense of how JAGs look at former biglawyers/clerks. I think I have a genuine, fairly convincing narrative for wanting to join. I'm most interested in AF and Navy, in case that makes a difference.


I'm hoping to go from biglaw to Marines at the upcoming June board, will let you know the outcome.



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