Military Law

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ArkansasFan
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Re: Military Law

Postby ArkansasFan » Tue Jun 23, 2009 1:53 pm

Hmmm. I don't know. Do you, as a lawyer, feel crazy yourself? lol

texaslawyer
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Re: Military Law

Postby texaslawyer » Tue Jun 23, 2009 1:58 pm

I'm not there yet, but is it rational and sane to go to law school in your mid fifties ? Probably not, but if I don't I'll never forgive myself and I'll just be dipped in brussell sprouts if I'm going to allow that to happen ! I want to practice criminal law. Bring on the DUIs, druggies and the like. Also, I'd like to do some work for The Innonence Project. I'm not a bleeding heart liberal, but if someone is wrongfully imprisioned then I must help exonerate them.

ArkansasFan
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Re: Military Law

Postby ArkansasFan » Tue Jun 23, 2009 3:07 pm

texaslawyer wrote:I'm not there yet, but is it rational and sane to go to law school in your mid fifties ? Probably not, but if I don't I'll never forgive myself and I'll just be dipped in brussell sprouts if I'm going to allow that to happen ! I want to practice criminal law. Bring on the DUIs, druggies and the like. Also, I'd like to do some work for The Innonence Project. I'm not a bleeding heart liberal, but if someone is wrongfully imprisioned then I must help exonerate them.


You know I was talking to a Mesquite, TX cop turned Little Rock defense lawyer yesterday. He gave me some PR doodads, and he went about his way. I've always wondered how people make the transition, other than dollar signs, from law enforcement to personal defense. I could understand going into prosecution, but that's not for me because 1) litigation doesn't seem to wow me, and 2) there are ample offenses that go thru the court docket that I think are so petty they should have never even been charged in the first place. I'd feel bad prosecuting people for certain things just as I would defending people for certain things.

texaslawyer
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Re: Military Law

Postby texaslawyer » Tue Jun 23, 2009 4:04 pm

Arkansasfan I can understand and appreciate your views on this. Yes, the courts are clogged up with many petty offenses that a fine, slap on the wrist and told that they were bad should be all that's done. In a perfect world, this would happen. However the world isn't perfect and this mundane stuff does happen. It is about money on some level or these things wouldn't be done. Litigation does light me up. I love getting up in front of groups and performing, making a presentation, etc. In high school I was a rarity, an athlete and an actor. You don't see that very often. People asked me which venue gave me the biggest thrill, the stage did. Being on stage, every light on you and 600-1000 people watching you. HOT DAMN WHAT A KICK IN THE PANTS ! WWOOOOHOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!! IT'S QUITE A RUSH ! Now let's be frank, it's an ego trip for sure. If a person isn't an egotistic SOB, then they need not be a litigator. Period. Particularily in criminal defense. We moved to Florida from Dallas when I was 15 and I tell you the legal talent down here is truly amazing. These guys know their stuff and you better bring your "A" game or you're toast. Texas also has some good ones. Same thing applies out there as well.

ArkansasFan
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Re: Military Law

Postby ArkansasFan » Tue Jun 23, 2009 5:22 pm

Yeah, I'm not a performer. I don't mind it, and I'm not shy about it. In fact, I actually do like giving speeches, etc. You know one of my academy instructors was a college drama major / team linebacker. He left college, got into SWAT and such then went on to instruct so you're not the only actor/athlete out there. There are others besides the famous guys on tv.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Tue Jun 23, 2009 5:29 pm

This would be an awesome correspondence via email or private messages instead of triggering my Topic Reply Notification every five minutes.

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iagolives
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Re: Military Law

Postby iagolives » Tue Jun 23, 2009 7:57 pm

ArkansasFan wrote:
texaslawyer wrote:I hear being a JAG in the Coast Guard isn't a bad deal. They are much smaller and from what I've seen this makes them more close knit. They do go to sea more than the Navy and they do go overseas and they do go in harm's way. They had a much larger presence in Vietnam than most people are aware of. However, they don't promote very quicly and most officers retire at Lieutennant Commander, maybe Commamder but you can't pretty much forget about Captain or Rear Admiral. Also, it helps to have gone to the Coast Guard Academy. Although these observations are quite dated and things may have changed.


Well, obviously I'd have to go in under a direct commission. Having scrutinized their areas of legal expertise the realm of "operational law" is what appeals to me - environmental, intelligence, investigation, law enforcement, border protection, advice to command, etc. It's the kind of venue I'd like to put into practice as an attorney - heightened application of law and procedure somehow coupled with investigations and field work although I must say I don't know if I'd do that as a USCG JAG, or if I'd even care in three years. I can't be a federal officer because I am red-green color blind so there's no point in me examining the federal LE agencies further. I just left district court an hour ago, and I do not want to be a court room lawyer. I've actually never lost a case of my own so I have no ill feelings towards any attorney but that kind of law isn't my idea of fun or a career.


Hey, I might be wrong, but I believe that the coast guard website says that you need normal color vision to get a commission to the coast guard. I'm not positive but I'm fairly confident, so you might want to look into that if you are really interested. Good luck!

E\/ERLAST
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Re: Military Law

Postby E\/ERLAST » Tue Jun 23, 2009 8:14 pm

iagolives wrote:
ArkansasFan wrote:
texaslawyer wrote:I hear being a JAG in the Coast Guard isn't a bad deal. They are much smaller and from what I've seen this makes them more close knit. They do go to sea more than the Navy and they do go overseas and they do go in harm's way. They had a much larger presence in Vietnam than most people are aware of. However, they don't promote very quicly and most officers retire at Lieutennant Commander, maybe Commamder but you can't pretty much forget about Captain or Rear Admiral. Also, it helps to have gone to the Coast Guard Academy. Although these observations are quite dated and things may have changed.


Well, obviously I'd have to go in under a direct commission. Having scrutinized their areas of legal expertise the realm of "operational law" is what appeals to me - environmental, intelligence, investigation, law enforcement, border protection, advice to command, etc. It's the kind of venue I'd like to put into practice as an attorney - heightened application of law and procedure somehow coupled with investigations and field work although I must say I don't know if I'd do that as a USCG JAG, or if I'd even care in three years. I can't be a federal officer because I am red-green color blind so there's no point in me examining the federal LE agencies further. I just left district court an hour ago, and I do not want to be a court room lawyer. I've actually never lost a case of my own so I have no ill feelings towards any attorney but that kind of law isn't my idea of fun or a career.


Hey, I might be wrong, but I believe that the coast guard website says that you need normal color vision to get a commission to the coast guard. I'm not positive but I'm fairly confident, so you might want to look into that if you are really interested. Good luck!



This would make sense with port and starboard lights being green and red.

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Rotor
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Re: Military Law

Postby Rotor » Tue Jun 23, 2009 8:22 pm

Color blind requirement may be for line officers. May not apply for JAGs, but you'll need to check with your recruiter, regardless of service.

ArkansasFan
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Re: Military Law

Postby ArkansasFan » Tue Jun 23, 2009 9:40 pm

iagolives wrote:
ArkansasFan wrote:
texaslawyer wrote:I hear being a JAG in the Coast Guard isn't a bad deal. They are much smaller and from what I've seen this makes them more close knit. They do go to sea more than the Navy and they do go overseas and they do go in harm's way. They had a much larger presence in Vietnam than most people are aware of. However, they don't promote very quicly and most officers retire at Lieutennant Commander, maybe Commamder but you can't pretty much forget about Captain or Rear Admiral. Also, it helps to have gone to the Coast Guard Academy. Although these observations are quite dated and things may have changed.


Well, obviously I'd have to go in under a direct commission. Having scrutinized their areas of legal expertise the realm of "operational law" is what appeals to me - environmental, intelligence, investigation, law enforcement, border protection, advice to command, etc. It's the kind of venue I'd like to put into practice as an attorney - heightened application of law and procedure somehow coupled with investigations and field work although I must say I don't know if I'd do that as a USCG JAG, or if I'd even care in three years. I can't be a federal officer because I am red-green color blind so there's no point in me examining the federal LE agencies further. I just left district court an hour ago, and I do not want to be a court room lawyer. I've actually never lost a case of my own so I have no ill feelings towards any attorney but that kind of law isn't my idea of fun or a career.


Hey, I might be wrong, but I believe that the coast guard website says that you need normal color vision to get a commission to the coast guard. I'm not positive but I'm fairly confident, so you might want to look into that if you are really interested. Good luck!



Yeah, I saw that earlier, lol. No point in going further. I didn't see if it applied to JAGs or not.

ArkansasFan
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Re: Military Law

Postby ArkansasFan » Tue Jun 23, 2009 9:41 pm

E\/ERLAST wrote:
iagolives wrote:
ArkansasFan wrote:
texaslawyer wrote:I hear being a JAG in the Coast Guard isn't a bad deal. They are much smaller and from what I've seen this makes them more close knit. They do go to sea more than the Navy and they do go overseas and they do go in harm's way. They had a much larger presence in Vietnam than most people are aware of. However, they don't promote very quicly and most officers retire at Lieutennant Commander, maybe Commamder but you can't pretty much forget about Captain or Rear Admiral. Also, it helps to have gone to the Coast Guard Academy. Although these observations are quite dated and things may have changed.


Well, obviously I'd have to go in under a direct commission. Having scrutinized their areas of legal expertise the realm of "operational law" is what appeals to me - environmental, intelligence, investigation, law enforcement, border protection, advice to command, etc. It's the kind of venue I'd like to put into practice as an attorney - heightened application of law and procedure somehow coupled with investigations and field work although I must say I don't know if I'd do that as a USCG JAG, or if I'd even care in three years. I can't be a federal officer because I am red-green color blind so there's no point in me examining the federal LE agencies further. I just left district court an hour ago, and I do not want to be a court room lawyer. I've actually never lost a case of my own so I have no ill feelings towards any attorney but that kind of law isn't my idea of fun or a career.


Hey, I might be wrong, but I believe that the coast guard website says that you need normal color vision to get a commission to the coast guard. I'm not positive but I'm fairly confident, so you might want to look into that if you are really interested. Good luck!



This would make sense with port and starboard lights being green and red.


Yeah, I had to learn that for boating enforcement. Just made guesses, lol.

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J-Rod
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Re: Military Law

Postby J-Rod » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:32 pm

For those that are still curious, the Army recently published their updated financial incentive changes on JAGCNet.



New financial incentives were recently approved for Judge Advocates. Summaries of the new benefits are below; please follow the links for more information.

1. Student Loan Repayment Program. For the first time, the JAG Corps is offering a loan repayment program. This program will offer up to $65K in loan repayment, over three years. It will not extend new Judge Advocates' initial service commitment (new JAs must serve 4 years on active duty).

2. Judge Advocate Continuation Pay. This is something that has been offered in different forms over the last decade or so. The program has been changed to offer a $60K bonus (in two installments), offered after the initial term of service in exchange for another 4 year commitment.

3. Critical Skills Retention Bonus. This is another new program and will offer another $60K (in 3 installments) to Majors who have completed the Graduate Course. Again, this will require an additional four year service commitment.

These programs are designed to work in concert to help keep good officers in the Army. A full summary of pay and benefits for Judge Advocates is available here. The JAG Corps is a great place to develop skills that firms, agencies, and private organizations are looking for. Judge Advocates who choose to leave the Army are in demand wherever they go. These programs are designed to ensure Judge Advocates have the financial freedom to continue pursuing a career with the JAG Corps and are not forced to the private sector due to the burden of law school debt.

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iagolives
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Re: Military Law

Postby iagolives » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:51 pm

J-Rod wrote:For those that are still curious, the Army recently published their updated financial incentive changes on JAGCNet.



New financial incentives were recently approved for Judge Advocates. Summaries of the new benefits are below; please follow the links for more information.

1. Student Loan Repayment Program. For the first time, the JAG Corps is offering a loan repayment program. This program will offer up to $65K in loan repayment, over three years. It will not extend new Judge Advocates' initial service commitment (new JAs must serve 4 years on active duty).

2. Judge Advocate Continuation Pay. This is something that has been offered in different forms over the last decade or so. The program has been changed to offer a $60K bonus (in two installments), offered after the initial term of service in exchange for another 4 year commitment.

3. Critical Skills Retention Bonus. This is another new program and will offer another $60K (in 3 installments) to Majors who have completed the Graduate Course. Again, this will require an additional four year service commitment.

These programs are designed to work in concert to help keep good officers in the Army. A full summary of pay and benefits for Judge Advocates is available here. The JAG Corps is a great place to develop skills that firms, agencies, and private organizations are looking for. Judge Advocates who choose to leave the Army are in demand wherever they go. These programs are designed to ensure Judge Advocates have the financial freedom to continue pursuing a career with the JAG Corps and are not forced to the private sector due to the burden of law school debt.


Wow, those incentives aren't that bad.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:53 pm

J-Rod wrote:For those that are still curious, the Army recently published their updated financial incentive changes on JAGCNet.



New financial incentives were recently approved for Judge Advocates. Summaries of the new benefits are below; please follow the links for more information.

1. Student Loan Repayment Program. For the first time, the JAG Corps is offering a loan repayment program. This program will offer up to $65K in loan repayment, over three years. It will not extend new Judge Advocates' initial service commitment (new JAs must serve 4 years on active duty).

2. Judge Advocate Continuation Pay. This is something that has been offered in different forms over the last decade or so. The program has been changed to offer a $60K bonus (in two installments), offered after the initial term of service in exchange for another 4 year commitment.

3. Critical Skills Retention Bonus. This is another new program and will offer another $60K (in 3 installments) to Majors who have completed the Graduate Course. Again, this will require an additional four year service commitment.

These programs are designed to work in concert to help keep good officers in the Army. A full summary of pay and benefits for Judge Advocates is available here. The JAG Corps is a great place to develop skills that firms, agencies, and private organizations are looking for. Judge Advocates who choose to leave the Army are in demand wherever they go. These programs are designed to ensure Judge Advocates have the financial freedom to continue pursuing a career with the JAG Corps and are not forced to the private sector due to the burden of law school debt.


As much as I hate the Army, I have to say these are incredible. The Air Force better get on board and quick.

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J-Rod
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Re: Military Law

Postby J-Rod » Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:21 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:
J-Rod wrote:For those that are still curious, the Army recently published their updated financial incentive changes on JAGCNet.



New financial incentives were recently approved for Judge Advocates. Summaries of the new benefits are below; please follow the links for more information.

1. Student Loan Repayment Program. For the first time, the JAG Corps is offering a loan repayment program. This program will offer up to $65K in loan repayment, over three years. It will not extend new Judge Advocates' initial service commitment (new JAs must serve 4 years on active duty).

2. Judge Advocate Continuation Pay. This is something that has been offered in different forms over the last decade or so. The program has been changed to offer a $60K bonus (in two installments), offered after the initial term of service in exchange for another 4 year commitment.

3. Critical Skills Retention Bonus. This is another new program and will offer another $60K (in 3 installments) to Majors who have completed the Graduate Course. Again, this will require an additional four year service commitment.

These programs are designed to work in concert to help keep good officers in the Army. A full summary of pay and benefits for Judge Advocates is available here. The JAG Corps is a great place to develop skills that firms, agencies, and private organizations are looking for. Judge Advocates who choose to leave the Army are in demand wherever they go. These programs are designed to ensure Judge Advocates have the financial freedom to continue pursuing a career with the JAG Corps and are not forced to the private sector due to the burden of law school debt.


As much as I hate the Army, I have to say these are incredible. The Air Force better get on board and quick.



If the Air Force and Navy don't get on board quick . . . they're gonna lose consideration from me very quickly . . . I mean, I could serve 10 years in Army JAG now, get $120k in cash, $65k in loan repayment . . . I could pocket the $120k, and let Virginia wipe out the remainder of my debt under LRAP at the 10 year mark . . .

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:29 pm

J-Rod wrote:
Patrick Bateman wrote:
J-Rod wrote:For those that are still curious, the Army recently published their updated financial incentive changes on JAGCNet.



New financial incentives were recently approved for Judge Advocates. Summaries of the new benefits are below; please follow the links for more information.

1. Student Loan Repayment Program. For the first time, the JAG Corps is offering a loan repayment program. This program will offer up to $65K in loan repayment, over three years. It will not extend new Judge Advocates' initial service commitment (new JAs must serve 4 years on active duty).

2. Judge Advocate Continuation Pay. This is something that has been offered in different forms over the last decade or so. The program has been changed to offer a $60K bonus (in two installments), offered after the initial term of service in exchange for another 4 year commitment.

3. Critical Skills Retention Bonus. This is another new program and will offer another $60K (in 3 installments) to Majors who have completed the Graduate Course. Again, this will require an additional four year service commitment.

These programs are designed to work in concert to help keep good officers in the Army. A full summary of pay and benefits for Judge Advocates is available here. The JAG Corps is a great place to develop skills that firms, agencies, and private organizations are looking for. Judge Advocates who choose to leave the Army are in demand wherever they go. These programs are designed to ensure Judge Advocates have the financial freedom to continue pursuing a career with the JAG Corps and are not forced to the private sector due to the burden of law school debt.


As much as I hate the Army, I have to say these are incredible. The Air Force better get on board and quick.



If the Air Force and Navy don't get on board quick . . . they're gonna lose consideration from me very quickly . . . I mean, I could serve 10 years in Army JAG now, get $120k in cash, $65k in loan repayment . . . I could pocket the $120k, and let Virginia wipe out the remainder of my debt under LRAP at the 10 year mark . . .


LRAP programs will take notice of this and adjust active duty grants accordingly. I just got my LRAP grant and they considered everything (BAH, BAS, etc), not just AGI (though they only technically consider AGI in coming to their calculation).
Last edited by Patrick Bateman on Fri Jun 26, 2009 1:03 am, edited 1 time in total.

ArkansasFan
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Re: Military Law

Postby ArkansasFan » Thu Jun 25, 2009 10:10 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:
J-Rod wrote:
Patrick Bateman wrote:
J-Rod wrote:For those that are still curious, the Army recently published their updated financial incentive changes on JAGCNet.



New financial incentives were recently approved for Judge Advocates. Summaries of the new benefits are below; please follow the links for more information.

1. Student Loan Repayment Program. For the first time, the JAG Corps is offering a loan repayment program. This program will offer up to $65K in loan repayment, over three years. It will not extend new Judge Advocates' initial service commitment (new JAs must serve 4 years on active duty).

2. Judge Advocate Continuation Pay. This is something that has been offered in different forms over the last decade or so. The program has been changed to offer a $60K bonus (in two installments), offered after the initial term of service in exchange for another 4 year commitment.

3. Critical Skills Retention Bonus. This is another new program and will offer another $60K (in 3 installments) to Majors who have completed the Graduate Course. Again, this will require an additional four year service commitment.

These programs are designed to work in concert to help keep good officers in the Army. A full summary of pay and benefits for Judge Advocates is available here. The JAG Corps is a great place to develop skills that firms, agencies, and private organizations are looking for. Judge Advocates who choose to leave the Army are in demand wherever they go. These programs are designed to ensure Judge Advocates have the financial freedom to continue pursuing a career with the JAG Corps and are not forced to the private sector due to the burden of law school debt.


As much as I hate the Army, I have to say these are incredible. The Air Force better get on board and quick.



If the Air Force and Navy don't get on board quick . . . they're gonna lose consideration from me very quickly . . . I mean, I could serve 10 years in Army JAG now, get $120k in cash, $65k in loan repayment . . . I could pocket the $120k, and let Virginia wipe out the remainder of my debt under LRAP at the 10 year mark . . .


I would not expect LRAP programs not to take notice of this. I just got my LRAP grant and they considered everything (BAH, BAS, etc), not just AGI (though they only technically consider AGI in coming to their calculation).



I used to be rather army-oriented. Wanted to do the whole ROTC bag in college, but found myself given an academic scholarship to a college without ROTC so that nixed that. Probably a good thing too really.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Mon Jun 29, 2009 10:22 pm

Some useful information came up in this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=75547

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J-Rod
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Re: Military Law

Postby J-Rod » Tue Jun 30, 2009 12:30 pm

If anyone has any more questions on Army JAG I can answer those, and I also met with a CMDR in Navy JAG stationed here, and there is a Captain from the Navy as well, so I have gotten a lot of information from them as well.

The Lt.CMDR who will be running accession boards for the Navy this year will be here in Aug. so I'm going to meet with her as well.

I am meeting with a MAJ in AF JAG later this week as well, so I can post up some of that info this weekend if it is wanted.

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ramjam
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Re: Military Law

Postby ramjam » Wed Jul 01, 2009 11:47 am

has anyone gone thru the air force's GLP....i very much would like 2 do JAG and have the opportunity to go thru ROTC throughout law school, i was an athlete in college n enjoy the early morning trainin vibe...in general im just wonderin how many ppl usually get choosen 2 enter this program, n what all does ROTC consist of other than mornin trainin and classes...thank u 4 ne input

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J-Rod
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Re: Military Law

Postby J-Rod » Wed Jul 01, 2009 2:47 pm

in the AF GLP, you must do the regular ROTC classwork, training, and during one of the two summers in law school, you go to training, so you can go to jump school, etc. you get paid while you're in training as well.

--LinkRemoved--

A lot more information on that page as far as the specifics. You can also look at the AFROTC website as well.

3milesup
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Re: Military Law

Postby 3milesup » Wed Jul 01, 2009 3:48 pm

J-Rod wrote:If anyone has any more questions on Army JAG I can answer those, and I also met with a CMDR in Navy JAG stationed here, and there is a Captain from the Navy as well, so I have gotten a lot of information from them as well.

The Lt.CMDR who will be running accession boards for the Navy this year will be here in Aug. so I'm going to meet with her as well.

I am meeting with a MAJ in AF JAG later this week as well, so I can post up some of that info this weekend if it is wanted.



I'm interested in both Amy JAG & Navy JAG, so whatever you find out would be great.

I recently heard that Navy JAG is going to revise their Senior JAG Appraiser interviews from a one-on-one interview to a board interview. Any further info on that would also be helpful. (In this regard, I am considering the extremely competitive direct appointment route).

As for Army, they are not so stringent in direct appointments, correct?

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Wed Jul 01, 2009 4:01 pm

ramjam wrote:has anyone gone thru the air force's GLP....i very much would like 2 do JAG and have the opportunity to go thru ROTC throughout law school, i was an athlete in college n enjoy the early morning trainin vibe...in general im just wonderin how many ppl usually get choosen 2 enter this program, n what all does ROTC consist of other than mornin trainin and classes...thank u 4 ne input


http://lmgtfy.com/?q=air+force+jag+glp+

HTH.

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ramjam
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Re: Military Law

Postby ramjam » Wed Jul 01, 2009 4:56 pm

master bateman

any educated guess could lead u to assume that i 1) know how 2 use google n 2) have looked at the air force website...the beginnin of my post clearly asked if neone has gone thru the air force's GLP, i see u went thru DA so u could have just so "oh no, i have not done GLP" and so forth, instead of http://lmgtfy.com/?q=air+force+jag+glp+

good day sir

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J-Rod
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Re: Military Law

Postby J-Rod » Wed Jul 01, 2009 5:23 pm

ramjam wrote:master bateman

any educated guess could lead u to assume that i 1) know how 2 use google n 2) have looked at the air force website...the beginnin of my post clearly asked if neone has gone thru the air force's GLP, i see u went thru DA so u could have just so "oh no, i have not done GLP" and so forth, instead of http://lmgtfy.com/?q=air+force+jag+glp+

good day sir


easy there killer, we like to keep things light here in the military thread




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