Military Law

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Kobe_Teeth
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Re: Military Law

Postby Kobe_Teeth » Wed Jul 18, 2012 7:04 pm

Have acceptance rates budged at all? Still in single digits? Low or high single digits?

target
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Re: Military Law

Postby target » Wed Jul 18, 2012 9:04 pm

Kobe_Teeth wrote:Have acceptance rates budged at all? Still in single digits? Low or high single digits?


Don't think so, at least for AF and Navy. Both are still in single digit.

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JCFindley
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Re: Military Law

Postby JCFindley » Wed Jul 18, 2012 9:51 pm

target wrote:
Kobe_Teeth wrote:Have acceptance rates budged at all? Still in single digits? Low or high single digits?


Don't think so, at least for AF and Navy. Both are still in single digit.


What I saw over and over again during my years in the military was that retention/hiring was cyclical and lagged behind the general economy's cycles. At least in the Air Force they never seemed to account for changes in both applications and retention that both varied based on the availability of civilian jobs. While the military is downsizing right now they will likely go to far as the economy will turn around and more people than they expected will leave then they will find they are short in many fields. Plus, their recruitment will also lag behind the economy because it takes time to ramp up training. If the past is any indicator of the future they will eventually find themselves behind the curve and while JAG slots will always be competitive the percentages will be WAY higher than now.

Note: While not familiar with the JAG core specifically I have see in in EVERY career field I am familiar with so it likely applies to the JAG corps as well. I have no guesses as to how long it will take to turn around.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:32 pm

JCFindley wrote:
target wrote:
Kobe_Teeth wrote:Have acceptance rates budged at all? Still in single digits? Low or high single digits?


Don't think so, at least for AF and Navy. Both are still in single digit.


What I saw over and over again during my years in the military was that retention/hiring was cyclical and lagged behind the general economy's cycles. At least in the Air Force they never seemed to account for changes in both applications and retention that both varied based on the availability of civilian jobs. While the military is downsizing right now they will likely go to far as the economy will turn around and more people than they expected will leave then they will find they are short in many fields. Plus, their recruitment will also lag behind the economy because it takes time to ramp up training. If the past is any indicator of the future they will eventually find themselves behind the curve and while JAG slots will always be competitive the percentages will be WAY higher than now.

Note: While not familiar with the JAG core specifically I have see in in EVERY career field I am familiar with so it likely applies to the JAG corps as well. I have no guesses as to how long it will take to turn around.


Agreed in regard to recruiting/retention being highly cyclical. Well said.

At four years, I cannot speak about greater historical trends within Air Force JAG. That said, it my understanding is that JAG has been consistently hiring (approximately) the same amount of JAGs each year. The supply of applicants has surged dramatically but the demand for applicants is roughly the same.

Unlike in some career fields, JAGs are ubitiquous. Regardless of MAJCOM, there is a JA element at every Wing, NAF, and MAJCOM HQ, to say nothing of our deployed assets and HQ AF presense. The Air Force is always evolving (still increasing emphasis on RPAs & ISR, supporting the general DoD "pivot" to the Pacific) but that fludity does not really impact JAGs from a hiring/firing perspective. Regardless of how and against whom we are projecting air superiority, you are still going to have a steady stream of JAGs in the mix. Our practice areas may see different emphasies over the years (military justice v. fiscal/contracting v. operational) but I don't see the demand decreasing in the way I have seen officers in other AFSCs simply be eliiminated.

If the economy picks up and the legal market improves, there may indeed be less applicants overall. That said, I applied in pre-recession 2007 and we were still looking at a max of 11% selection. Obviously that is better than 2%-3% but even in the fat years, selection was not a wak in the park.

I also still believe (personally, not representing any official AF viewpoint) that we are seeing more applicants, but not necessarily more qualified applicants. As has been discussed ad nausem throughout this thread, the JAG selection process is a nebulous process because they are not just selecting lawyers, but military officers. There are plenty of talented law students and taleted lawyers applying out there but most of them are not going to be cut out to be wearing bars. There have to be a fair amount of those applicants that would otherwise not consider JAG but for the dearth of other oppurtunities. Given my knowledge of the selection process, those folks probably are not going to make the cut regardless.

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JCFindley
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Re: Military Law

Postby JCFindley » Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:59 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:I also still believe (personally, not representing any official AF viewpoint) that we are seeing more applicants, but not necessarily more qualified applicants. As has been discussed ad nausem throughout this thread, the JAG selection process is a nebulous process because they are not just selecting lawyers, but military officers. There are plenty of talented law students and taleted lawyers applying out there but most of them are not going to be cut out to be wearing bars. There have to be a fair amount of those applicants that would otherwise not consider JAG but for the dearth of other oppurtunities. Given my knowledge of the selection process, those folks probably are not going to make the cut regardless.


It was the same way in my field as well and I agree 100%. It is never just about doing the job in the military.

Kobe_Teeth
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Re: Military Law

Postby Kobe_Teeth » Wed Jul 18, 2012 11:15 pm

Among the many reasons I love this thread, actually getting a quality answer is probably my top reason. Thank you both. I'm a rising 3L, applying to AF and Navy, possibly Army. I've always worked public service jobs, now looking for the ultimate service, crossing my fingers, but not expecting.

target
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Re: Military Law

Postby target » Wed Jul 18, 2012 11:46 pm

Kobe_Teeth wrote:Among the many reasons I love this thread, actually getting a quality answer is probably my top reason.


Ditto this.

Texan09
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Re: Military Law

Postby Texan09 » Thu Jul 19, 2012 8:28 pm

target wrote:
Kobe_Teeth wrote:Have acceptance rates budged at all? Still in single digits? Low or high single digits?


Don't think so, at least for AF and Navy. Both are still in single digit.


The Army is still 6-8% as well.

Also, I will be finishing my summer internship with the Army in about 2 weeks. If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask. As stated before, I also did a non-paid internship for credit with the Air Force, so I can give some limited comparisons.

target
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Re: Military Law

Postby target » Thu Jul 19, 2012 9:09 pm

Texan09 wrote:Also, I will be finishing my summer internship with the Army in about 2 weeks. If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask. As stated before, I also did a non-paid internship for credit with the Air Force, so I can give some limited comparisons.


are you a 1L or 2L? how was your experience interning for the army? do you plan to apply to Army JAG? why or why not?

Texan09
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Re: Military Law

Postby Texan09 » Fri Jul 20, 2012 1:48 am

target wrote:
Texan09 wrote:Also, I will be finishing my summer internship with the Army in about 2 weeks. If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask. As stated before, I also did a non-paid internship for credit with the Air Force, so I can give some limited comparisons.


are you a 1L or 2L? how was your experience interning for the army? do you plan to apply to Army JAG? why or why not?


I'm a rising 3L.

I have loved my internship with the Army. They rotate you through the four main sections they have: legal assistance/claims; ad law; criminal prosecution; criminal defense. I spent roughly two weeks at each. I have had the opportunity to do substantive work, as well as shadow the attorneys as they advise commanders, interview clients, and try court martials. Also had the opportunity go play with some 105mm howitzers.

I am prior service army and air force enlisted and I plan on applying to both. My preference is for the army for two main reasons: 1) During your first tour in the army you only work in one of the above sections at a time. Typically you rotate through each for about a year. In the air force you are going to be doing all of them (except for criminal defense) at the same time. After discussing both systems with attorneys in both branches, and seeing each in operation, my preference is for the army's system. 2) As stated on this thread before, each branches members have different personalities. I liked every Air Force JAG I worked with, but I am just more of an army guy.

That being said, if I am picked up by the Air Force and not the Army, I will happily take the commission and enjoy the better base locations.

Fed_Atty
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Re: Military Law

Postby Fed_Atty » Fri Jul 20, 2012 1:53 pm

New Leadership Takes Helm of Navy Judge Advocate General's Corps

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Navy's Judge Advocate General's (JAG) Corps held a change of office ceremony on July 20, at the Washington Navy Yard.

During the traditional change of office ceremony, presided over by the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, Vice Adm. James W. Houck retired and was relieved by Vice Adm. Nanette M. DeRenzi who became the 42nd Judge Advocate General of the Navy. Vice Adm. DeRenzi previously served as the Deputy Judge Advocate General and Commander, Naval Legal Service Command.

Greenert lauded Houck for his service and his exceptional leadership.

"Jim [Houck] focused his Corps on warfighting. He put together a Corps that was there to support." said Greenert.

During Houck's tenure as the JAG, the Corps provided counsel on a number of important issues including the transition from "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," prosecution by Military Commissions, protection of navigational rights and freedoms, combating sexual assault, and support to Wounded, Ill, and Injured Sailors and Marines.

"[I've] had a great American experience," said Houck. "In a nation of laws, I was allowed to become a lawyer and tried to do a little good in a legal system that is still the foundation of this great democracy. I was allowed to sail and serve in one of history's greatest navies in defense of those freedoms. And best of all, in a nation of the people, I was allowed to serve with the finest people -- military and civilian, officer and enlisted."

DeRenzi will serve as the Navy JAG for three years.

"Today is a day for the men and women of the JAG Corps to recommit ourselves to service, to each other, and to those we serve." said DeRenzi. "Some may look back and long for the time when resources were abundant and challenges were traditional and predictable. Not me. This is our time and we will embrace the challenges that come with it."

Rear Adm. James W. Crawford, III was promoted prior to the ceremony to the rank of rear admiral (upper half) and will serve as the Deputy Judge Advocate General and Commander, Naval Legal Service Command. He previously served as Commander, Rule of Law Field Force-Afghanistan.

"It is a distinct honor to be standing here today. I'm mindful of the honor bestowed upon me today and trust given" said Crawford. "[Trust] is the belief in two old fashion qualities - consistence and integrity. It is these two words that will guide me as I begin my watch today."

The Judge Advocate General of the Navy provides legal and policy advice to the Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of Naval Operations on all legal matters from military justice to environmental law. The Judge Advocate General also directs a worldwide law firm of more than 2,300 attorneys, paralegals and support staff.

Naval Legal Service Command provides prosecution, defense, personal representation, legal assistance, and other command services to shore and afloat commands throughout the world.

The entire ceremony will be posted by the end of the day on JAG Radio at http://www.jag.navy.mil/news/jagradio/jag_radio.htm.

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Scotusnerd
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Re: Military Law

Postby Scotusnerd » Fri Jul 20, 2012 2:22 pm

I've been tracking this thread for a while, and I just wanted to say thank you so much to those of you who are taking the time to post it. This is by far the best resource I've found on JAG information.

This thread convinced me that the best thing I can do for my job prospects right now is to get in shape, try and find an internship, and apply for the early programs for the different branches.

I want to be able to make them take me because I am officer material, not hope to take me because it's another job. I've started doing crunches and pushups everyday, and I'm going to contact recruiters as soon as I move to the city, to see if they have any sort of fitness programs that could help me.

This thread is something special. Thank you very much to all of the JAGs and law students who have shared their time and knowledge with us!

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Rotor
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Re: Military Law

Postby Rotor » Sat Jul 21, 2012 1:59 am

NavyJAG1 wrote:[edited]During the traditional change of office ceremony, presided over by the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert . . . .

Good gawd. Leave the Navy for three years to go to law school and you don't even hear when your old boss becomes CNO. Thanks for making me feel out of touch (on top of what my final bar review is already doing) :wink:

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howell
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Re: Military Law

Postby howell » Sat Jul 21, 2012 5:28 am

Scotusnerd wrote:This thread convinced me that the best thing I can do for my job prospects right now is to get in shape, try and find an internship, and apply for the early programs for the different branches.

I want to be able to make them take me because I am officer material, not hope to take me because it's another job. I've started doing crunches and pushups everyday, and I'm going to contact recruiters as soon as I move to the city, to see if they have any sort of fitness programs that could help me.


From the physical side, I would suggest getting to know the fitness test and height & weight requirements for any of the branches you're interest in along with getting used to running regularly. Others may have different opinions, but weight and the ability to run are two of the physical components that take the longest to get in line if they are not already. And if you can do well with respect to the running requirements and are within the weight requirements, push-ups and sit-ups will likely be easily trainable (at least for guys...perhaps women might have a tougher time with upper body exercises).

1L should certainly be about grades, but there are things you can do to start molding yourself. I did well in law school and checked off most of the academic feathers in the cap, but, based off of feedback from interviews and other interactions, there are other things that can help if you don't have a track record of doing them currently. Look for leadership and volunteer opportunities, even (and sometimes especially) if they're outside of the legal world. You'll also be close to Fort Jackson and Shaw AFB, so you can possibly do internships (during summers or during the school year) after your 1L year at either or both even if you can't get into the traditional internship programs. My last interview was at Shaw, and I believe my interviewer mentioned having worked with a USC law student over multiple semesters.

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JCFindley
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Re: Military Law

Postby JCFindley » Sat Jul 21, 2012 7:29 am

howell wrote:
Scotusnerd wrote:This thread convinced me that the best thing I can do for my job prospects right now is to get in shape, try and find an internship, and apply for the early programs for the different branches.

I want to be able to make them take me because I am officer material, not hope to take me because it's another job. I've started doing crunches and pushups everyday, and I'm going to contact recruiters as soon as I move to the city, to see if they have any sort of fitness programs that could help me.


From the physical side, I would suggest getting to know the fitness test and height & weight requirements for any of the branches you're interest in along with getting used to running regularly. Others may have different opinions, but weight and the ability to run are two of the physical components that take the longest to get in line if they are not already. And if you can do well with respect to the running requirements and are within the weight requirements, push-ups and sit-ups will likely be easily trainable (at least for guys...perhaps women might have a tougher time with upper body exercises).

1L should certainly be about grades, but there are things you can do to start molding yourself. I did well in law school and checked off most of the academic feathers in the cap, but, based off of feedback from interviews and other interactions, there are other things that can help if you don't have a track record of doing them currently. Look for leadership and volunteer opportunities, even (and sometimes especially) if they're outside of the legal world. You'll also be close to Fort Jackson and Shaw AFB, so you can possibly do internships (during summers or during the school year) after your 1L year at either or both even if you can't get into the traditional internship programs. My last interview was at Shaw, and I believe my interviewer mentioned having worked with a USC law student over multiple semesters.


You will also be reasonably close to Pope/Brag, Charleston, Paris Island and several other basis within a half days drive.

I agree about the running and weight. The big two especially when dealing with the USN, USAF, and Army. If you want to be a Marine, train EVERYTHING hard.

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Scotusnerd
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Re: Military Law

Postby Scotusnerd » Sat Jul 21, 2012 2:28 pm

Great ideas about the bases. I will look into that my second year. I'm working out with the goal of the Marines: I figure that they're the hardest, and if I'm fit for Marines, I'm fit for any branch. I watched the videos on OCS and TBS.

:shock:

Serious stuff. Anyways, you mentioned volunteering outside of the school. I think this is a good idea. Is there any particular type of public service that the armed branches look for, or that you would recommend?

toster19
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Re: Military Law

Postby toster19 » Mon Jul 23, 2012 1:47 am

I am finishing a summer internship with Navy. does anyone have any insight into selection rate/chances of interns?

NAOBERJU
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Re: Military Law

Postby NAOBERJU » Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:08 am

I participated in the Navy internship last summer and was picked up by the fall board. I can't speak to the overall acceptance rate. I am also finishing up the Army 2L internship this summer in Germany if anybody has any questions.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Mon Jul 23, 2012 2:36 pm

Scotusnerd wrote:Great ideas about the bases. I will look into that my second year. I'm working out with the goal of the Marines: I figure that they're the hardest, and if I'm fit for Marines, I'm fit for any branch. I watched the videos on OCS and TBS.

:shock:

Serious stuff. Anyways, you mentioned volunteering outside of the school. I think this is a good idea. Is there any particular type of public service that the armed branches look for, or that you would recommend?


I was deployed to Guantanamo back in 2010/2011. On the Naval Station side of the installation, there is the eponymously named Marine Hill, where the Marine Corps Security Force Company is located. This is a big hill with a steep grade. One morning, as I'm coming back from PT, I see 4-5 Marines pushing a Ford F-150 up the hill, with one at the steering wheel. I think, "Truck must have died and they are pushing it up to their motor pool." As I get closer to Marine Hill, I then notice a couple dozen Marines in their PTs and several of these F-150s at the bottom of the hill. It then occurs to me that THIS is their PT for the morning. They are pushing F-150s up this huge hill, driving them down, and then pushing them up again.

The Devil Dogs do not mess around. One of my closest friends in the JTF was our Marine JAG. Smart guy and an outstanding Marine Officer.

In regard to the volunteer work: I’ll start with the premise that anything is better than nothing. Public service can come in many forms – a lot of it is simply showing your dedication to the community and something larger than yourself. I’ve seen volunteer experience at DA/PD/USAO offices, all litigation and government focused. I have also seen great volunteer creds out of volunteering with the Veterans Administration or programs like the Wounded Warrior Project. I think it is all gravy and a valuable service for your community – some might give you more practical skills, others might give you a better idea of how the military functions. If you are passionate about a subject matter, pursue that. I could not see a SJA turning down his/her nose about volunteering at X versus Y. Any chance to volunteer at a base legal office is one you should absolutely take.

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JCFindley
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Re: Military Law

Postby JCFindley » Mon Jul 23, 2012 6:06 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:
I was deployed to Guantanamo back in 2010/2011. On the Naval Station side of the installation, there is the eponymously named Marine Hill, where the Marine Corps Security Force Company is located. This is a big hill with a steep grade. One morning, as I'm coming back from PT, I see 4-5 Marines pushing a Ford F-150 up the hill, with one at the steering wheel. I think, "Truck must have died and they are pushing it up to their motor pool." As I get closer to Marine Hill, I then notice a couple dozen Marines in their PTs and several of these F-150s at the bottom of the hill. It then occurs to me that THIS is their PT for the morning. They are pushing F-150s up this huge hill, driving them down, and then pushing them up again.

The Devil Dogs do not mess around. One of my closest friends in the JTF was our Marine JAG. Smart guy and an outstanding Marine Officer.



Not to turn this into a Marines are bad asses thread but yeah, the quote from a Few Good Men about them being fanatical about being Marines has applied to every one of them I have ever met. I live near Quantico now and work out at the gym there. When I was in the Air Force I was in better shape than 95% of my brethren in that service. I would say I was in about as good a shape as the weakest female Marine that currently works out at Quantico.

Every service, (even the USAF,) has its bad asses but the other three expect JAGs and other noncombatant specialties to meet basic standards which really aren't that hard. The Corps takes "Every Marine a Rifleman" to serious extremes.

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Scotusnerd
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Re: Military Law

Postby Scotusnerd » Mon Jul 23, 2012 8:34 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:
I was deployed to Guantanamo back in 2010/2011. On the Naval Station side of the installation, there is the eponymously named Marine Hill, where the Marine Corps Security Force Company is located. This is a big hill with a steep grade. One morning, as I'm coming back from PT, I see 4-5 Marines pushing a Ford F-150 up the hill, with one at the steering wheel. I think, "Truck must have died and they are pushing it up to their motor pool." As I get closer to Marine Hill, I then notice a couple dozen Marines in their PTs and several of these F-150s at the bottom of the hill. It then occurs to me that THIS is their PT for the morning. They are pushing F-150s up this huge hill, driving them down, and then pushing them up again.

The Devil Dogs do not mess around. One of my closest friends in the JTF was our Marine JAG. Smart guy and an outstanding Marine Officer.



:shock:

THAT IS AWESOME.

I'm sorry. I just had to say it. Thank you for sharing your stories!

JCFindley wrote:Not to turn this into a Marines are bad asses thread but yeah, the quote from a Few Good Men about them being fanatical about being Marines has applied to every one of them I have ever met. I live near Quantico now and work out at the gym there. When I was in the Air Force I was in better shape than 95% of my brethren in that service. I would say I was in about as good a shape as the weakest female Marine that currently works out at Quantico.

Every service, (even the USAF,) has its bad asses but the other three expect JAGs and other noncombatant specialties to meet basic standards which really aren't that hard. The Corps takes "Every Marine a Rifleman" to serious extremes.


Thanks for sharing your experiences as well. The Marines really sound attractive to me, but I have to push myself hard to work out. I'm nowhere near ready. It will come with time and effort, though.

Thank you both for your insights! I have work to do and laps to run now.

Starscream15
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Re: Military Law

Postby Starscream15 » Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:37 pm

I have read this thread and just wanted to pop in. I was recently selected for AF JAG through DAP in the last board. I accepted and I am waiting for a MEPs date. (seems like taking forever :roll: ) I know a lot of people seem to ask what it takes to get accepted so I wanted to just share my experience so far.

Unlike many of the applicants accepted, I did not do a JAG internship and I did not apply right out of school. I had actually worked as a Deputy DA for a year with two years interning at the same DA's office. I was laid off due to budget cuts and was out of work for about 2 months before I applied. I had significant trial experience, with dozens of actual trials to my name, and my letters of rec were from a sitting judge who had presided at 3 of my trials and the rest were from my DA supes.

I went to a top 25 law school and had finished with mediocre grades. (top 40%) However I had a lot of experience from my DA job, I had interned at the US Attorney's Office, and I had been busy working in law school. (TA for undergrad PoliSci; Outreach Tutor, Stand Down Veterans Volunteer etc.)

I only applied once (for this I will always be thankful to God) and I was accepted.

From my experience, I know that they look at the entire person in their decisions. I nailed my interview. That was probably one of the most significant things. I knew I nailed it because I was able to impress the SJA by giving examples of the cases I had tried, my volunteer experience, my sincere desire to go JAG, my understanding of military requirements (father was a Sgt. in Army and brother just commissioned 2nd Lt. Army), and my commitment to public service (I was a DDA, not big law refugee in a down economy etc.). The SJA had me go to lunch with his staff as well so I figured that had to be a good sign. While with them I made it a point to get to know them. I spoke with the Area Defense Counsel who joined us as well as all the enlisted NCOs who ate with us. One of them told me later that they liked that I was down to earth (we talked movies, sports etc.) and not stuck up or weird. (Their words not mine) I got the feeling that a lot of people come in to the interviews ready to just slap on a uniform without thinking about the fact that you will be not just a lawyer, but also a leader. Also I had been decently active in sports and martial arts and I think the SJA liked that. Bottom line though, I let my people skills do the work. I have picked juries, worked with lawyers, victims and judges. I have also had crap jobs like busing tables and stocking store shelves. I think that I was selected because I was myself in my interview and I was able to show them why I wanted to serve.

So I hope this helps people who have questions. I wrote this quickly because it is Friday afternoon, but I just wanted to let people know what my experience applying has been. I am not trying to toot my own horn here but just trying to give you some facts from someone who's career path is different than most. I also really appreciate the other posts here from AD JAGs. The information provided by them has been extremely helpful to me in my process.

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Doc Review Lifer
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Re: Military Law

Postby Doc Review Lifer » Mon Jul 30, 2012 9:24 am

Just an interesting Monday morning read...

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/07/deserter-fuba/

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Mon Jul 30, 2012 11:10 am

Starscream15 wrote:I have read this thread and just wanted to pop in. I was recently selected for AF JAG through DAP in the last board. I accepted and I am waiting for a MEPs date. (seems like taking forever :roll: ) I know a lot of people seem to ask what it takes to get accepted so I wanted to just share my experience so far.

Unlike many of the applicants accepted, I did not do a JAG internship and I did not apply right out of school. I had actually worked as a Deputy DA for a year with two years interning at the same DA's office. I was laid off due to budget cuts and was out of work for about 2 months before I applied. I had significant trial experience, with dozens of actual trials to my name, and my letters of rec were from a sitting judge who had presided at 3 of my trials and the rest were from my DA supes.

I went to a top 25 law school and had finished with mediocre grades. (top 40%) However I had a lot of experience from my DA job, I had interned at the US Attorney's Office, and I had been busy working in law school. (TA for undergrad PoliSci; Outreach Tutor, Stand Down Veterans Volunteer etc.)

I only applied once (for this I will always be thankful to God) and I was accepted.

From my experience, I know that they look at the entire person in their decisions. I nailed my interview. That was probably one of the most significant things. I knew I nailed it because I was able to impress the SJA by giving examples of the cases I had tried, my volunteer experience, my sincere desire to go JAG, my understanding of military requirements (father was a Sgt. in Army and brother just commissioned 2nd Lt. Army), and my commitment to public service (I was a DDA, not big law refugee in a down economy etc.). The SJA had me go to lunch with his staff as well so I figured that had to be a good sign. While with them I made it a point to get to know them. I spoke with the Area Defense Counsel who joined us as well as all the enlisted NCOs who ate with us. One of them told me later that they liked that I was down to earth (we talked movies, sports etc.) and not stuck up or weird. (Their words not mine) I got the feeling that a lot of people come in to the interviews ready to just slap on a uniform without thinking about the fact that you will be not just a lawyer, but also a leader. Also I had been decently active in sports and martial arts and I think the SJA liked that. Bottom line though, I let my people skills do the work. I have picked juries, worked with lawyers, victims and judges. I have also had crap jobs like busing tables and stocking store shelves. I think that I was selected because I was myself in my interview and I was able to show them why I wanted to serve.

So I hope this helps people who have questions. I wrote this quickly because it is Friday afternoon, but I just wanted to let people know what my experience applying has been. I am not trying to toot my own horn here but just trying to give you some facts from someone who's career path is different than most. I also really appreciate the other posts here from AD JAGs. The information provided by them has been extremely helpful to me in my process.


Congrats on your selection and welcome to the board. Great post – thanks for putting that together.

target
Posts: 688
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 6:40 pm

Re: Military Law

Postby target » Tue Jul 31, 2012 5:26 pm

congrats starscream! I think your work experience as ADA definitely helped. If you don't mind me asking, what did you do while you were applying? Did you consider other options besides JAG?




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