Military Law

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Wed May 26, 2010 9:17 pm

Paichka wrote:And when you interview? It really helps to know what the JAGC does. Besides courts martial. Two of the officers in my office have served as FSOs, and they were telling me how ridiculous it is to have candidates come into the interview without a clue about what JAGs actually do on a day to day basis.

One was telling me horror stories about her interviewees, including:

(1) The guy who apparently thought she was a recruiter, and expected her to sell HIM on the JAGC. Like any interview, you are attempting to convince the nice FSO that you deserve to be selected for one of these highly competitive slots. If you want to be wined and dined, JAGC is not for you.

(2) The guy who told her he wasn't looking to work too hard, and really thought a nice 9-to-5 government job sounded like an easy paycheck. When she asked him how he felt about 15 months without a day off, his reply? "Duuuuuude, no!" Never "dude" your interviewer. That really should be self-evident, I think.

(3) She told me that she always asked the interviewees what they saw themselves doing downrange. This question was to see if they'd done their homework about what JAGs do -- if they said something like "labor and employment", she crossed them off her list. (Labor & Employment is a big part of JAG practice when we're stateside -- not so much downrange because you're working with fewer civilians) She said the biggest ding was when interviewees couldn't name anything other than military justice -- if they could actually talk intelligently about the other areas of JAG practice, such as operational law or contracting or environmental law, she would be far more likely to recommend them to the board.


Simply outstanding response. Even though this is written with the Army in mind, 99% of this is directly applicable to Air Force JAG. We don't have FSOs or the like, but as my office's recruiting POC, I have seen a ton of similar mistakes from applicants interviewing with my SJA.

Personally, I feel the issue noted in the top paragraph and #2 is a huge issue. A lot of applicants see us as like a DOJ sub-branch that happens to work for the Armed Forces, not realizing at all the officer component to what we do. They don't really get what service as an Armed Forces officer entails and that the captain's bars are more than just an indication of pay-grade.

colemf
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Re: Military Law

Postby colemf » Wed May 26, 2010 9:25 pm

Does anyone know what the stats are for Air Force JAG going to the "Front Lines" or at a camp near the action? While I understand there is a sort of rotation of responsibilties, I really would like to be in the thick of things at least at some point during my 4 years, if possible, or is this more of an Army JAG thing?

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Wed May 26, 2010 9:43 pm

colemf wrote:Does anyone know what the stats are for Air Force JAG going to the "Front Lines" or at a camp near the action? While I understand there is a sort of rotation of responsibilties, I really would like to be in the thick of things at least at some point during my 4 years, if possible, or is this more of an Army JAG thing?


The shortest answer possible to this question is that it is way more of an Army JAG thing.

I'll stay out of the tall grass of there not really being front lines anymore.

I cannot comment on the Army JAG experience in the AOR but keep perspective on the fact that JAGs are staff officers that serve in a professional role. The combat arms community exists for a reason. We do the lawyering, the warriors do the ass kicking.

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Paichka
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Re: Military Law

Postby Paichka » Wed May 26, 2010 9:50 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:
colemf wrote:Does anyone know what the stats are for Air Force JAG going to the "Front Lines" or at a camp near the action? While I understand there is a sort of rotation of responsibilties, I really would like to be in the thick of things at least at some point during my 4 years, if possible, or is this more of an Army JAG thing?


The shortest answer possible to this question is that it is way more of an Army JAG thing.

I'll stay out of the tall grass of there not really being front lines anymore.

I cannot comment on the Army JAG experience in the AOR but keep perspective on the fact that JAGs are staff officers that serve in a professional role. The combat arms community exists for a reason. We do the lawyering, the warriors do the ass kicking.


Yeah, mostly. Afghanistan gets a little hairy these days, though. In order to provide legal services to all the troops, you can get sent out to patrol bases where you're kind of cut off from the office. Deputy TJAG (second or third highest ranking JAG officer in the Army) was here last week, and in his briefing he shared a story about his last deployment to Afghanistan and how two of his officers were sent out into the desert and ended up getting combat action badges when their patrol base was attacked. So it happens. As Patrick said, though, it isn't really our role. If you want to shoot stuff join the infantry. :)

colemf
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Re: Military Law

Postby colemf » Wed May 26, 2010 11:50 pm

Believe me I fully intend on leaving the ass kicking to the warriors, but the idea of providing legal services at a patrol base is for sure something I would be up for.

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Paichka
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Re: Military Law

Postby Paichka » Thu May 27, 2010 6:24 am

colemf wrote:Believe me I fully intend on leaving the ass kicking to the warriors, but the idea of providing legal services at a patrol base is for sure something I would be up for.


I think you are more likely to get to do that with either the Army or Marine JAG, then. The Army is just a bigger corps, and the Marines are just hardcore that way.

hasmith
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Re: Military Law

Postby hasmith » Thu May 27, 2010 8:52 am

Paichka wrote:
Patrick Bateman wrote:
colemf wrote:Does anyone know what the stats are for Air Force JAG going to the "Front Lines" or at a camp near the action? While I understand there is a sort of rotation of responsibilties, I really would like to be in the thick of things at least at some point during my 4 years, if possible, or is this more of an Army JAG thing?


The shortest answer possible to this question is that it is way more of an Army JAG thing.

I'll stay out of the tall grass of there not really being front lines anymore.

I cannot comment on the Army JAG experience in the AOR but keep perspective on the fact that JAGs are staff officers that serve in a professional role. The combat arms community exists for a reason. We do the lawyering, the warriors do the ass kicking.


Yeah, mostly. Afghanistan gets a little hairy these days, though. In order to provide legal services to all the troops, you can get sent out to patrol bases where you're kind of cut off from the office. Deputy TJAG (second or third highest ranking JAG officer in the Army) was here last week, and in his briefing he shared a story about his last deployment to Afghanistan and how two of his officers were sent out into the desert and ended up getting combat action badges when their patrol base was attacked. So it happens. As Patrick said, though, it isn't really our role. If you want to shoot stuff join the infantry. :)


I think Paichka hit it right on the head. I spent a year in Afghanistan as a staff officer (not JAG). As an engineer, we worked from one of the bigger bases but frequently travelled out to Forward Operating Bases to provide support. You never know when your convoy may come under attack. Even though it is rarely in the news, some of those forward operating bases are in near daily firefights.
You won’t be breaking down doors as a JAG officer. However, you may well see action. Particularly now as the Taliban seems to have taken on a new tact of striking in areas that were largely “safe” in the past (Kabul, the base in Kandahar etc.)

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stintez
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Re: Military Law

Postby stintez » Thu May 27, 2010 10:51 am

I have a few questions.

1) Can you take medicine as Ritalin while serving, I talked to a navy recruiter and he said not until after boot camp is this accurate for JAG

2) I am a 0L what is the best way to get into a summer program Ill be going to law school very close to Wright Pat should I go and talk to someone their?

3) Are the summer internships paid?

Thanks everyone for any answers.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu May 27, 2010 11:07 am

stintez wrote:I have a few questions.

1) Can you take medicine as Ritalin while serving, I talked to a navy recruiter and he said not until after boot camp is this accurate for JAG

2) I am a 0L what is the best way to get into a summer program Ill be going to law school very close to Wright Pat should I go and talk to someone their?

3) Are the summer internships paid?

Thanks everyone for any answers.


As has been noted throughout this beast of a thread, these answers can vary based on what service you are interested in joining.

1. ADD/ADHD can be disqualifying for the USAF - any mental health treatment requires disclosure and sometimes a waiver from JAX/SECAF. The big issue is that the Rx impacts your ability to world-wide deployable. If you need ADD meds, you cannot be deployed anywhere in which you might not have access to ADD meds.

2. The power of the Google: --LinkRemoved--

3. See above - yes for USAF.

4. "there" not "their"

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stintez
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Re: Military Law

Postby stintez » Thu May 27, 2010 12:09 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:
stintez wrote:I have a few questions.

1) Can you take medicine as Ritalin while serving, I talked to a navy recruiter and he said not until after boot camp is this accurate for JAG

2) I am a 0L what is the best way to get into a summer program Ill be going to law school very close to Wright Pat should I go and talk to someone their?

3) Are the summer internships paid?

Thanks everyone for any answers.


As has been noted throughout this beast of a thread, these answers can vary based on what service you are interested in joining.

1. ADD/ADHD can be disqualifying for the USAF - any mental health treatment requires disclosure and sometimes a waiver from JAX/SECAF. The big issue is that the Rx impacts your ability to world-wide deployable. If you need ADD meds, you cannot be deployed anywhere in which you might not have access to ADD meds.

2. The power of the Google: --LinkRemoved--

3. See above - yes for USAF.

4. "there" not "their"



Sounds good thank you.

colemf
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Re: Military Law

Postby colemf » Thu May 27, 2010 8:37 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:
Paichka wrote:And when you interview? It really helps to know what the JAGC does. Besides courts martial. Two of the officers in my office have served as FSOs, and they were telling me how ridiculous it is to have candidates come into the interview without a clue about what JAGs actually do on a day to day basis.

One was telling me horror stories about her interviewees, including:

(1) The guy who apparently thought she was a recruiter, and expected her to sell HIM on the JAGC. Like any interview, you are attempting to convince the nice FSO that you deserve to be selected for one of these highly competitive slots. If you want to be wined and dined, JAGC is not for you.

(2) The guy who told her he wasn't looking to work too hard, and really thought a nice 9-to-5 government job sounded like an easy paycheck. When she asked him how he felt about 15 months without a day off, his reply? "Duuuuuude, no!" Never "dude" your interviewer. That really should be self-evident, I think.

(3) She told me that she always asked the interviewees what they saw themselves doing downrange. This question was to see if they'd done their homework about what JAGs do -- if they said something like "labor and employment", she crossed them off her list. (Labor & Employment is a big part of JAG practice when we're stateside -- not so much downrange because you're working with fewer civilians) She said the biggest ding was when interviewees couldn't name anything other than military justice -- if they could actually talk intelligently about the other areas of JAG practice, such as operational law or contracting or environmental law, she would be far more likely to recommend them to the board.


Simply outstanding response. Even though this is written with the Army in mind, 99% of this is directly applicable to Air Force JAG. We don't have FSOs or the like, but as my office's recruiting POC, I have seen a ton of similar mistakes from applicants interviewing with my SJA.

Personally, I feel the issue noted in the top paragraph and #2 is a huge issue. A lot of applicants see us as like a DOJ sub-branch that happens to work for the Armed Forces, not realizing at all the officer component to what we do. They don't really get what service as an Armed Forces officer entails and that the captain's bars are more than just an indication of pay-grade.


I plan on starting the whole process this coming year so anything like this or anything that you all think I should know that one wouldn't normally figure out through research would be greatly appreciated. I want to be as prepared as possible when I walk in that room for my interview.

3milesup
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Re: Military Law

Postby 3milesup » Sat Jun 05, 2010 3:31 pm

Question re: Army Reserve selection ....

So I had my FSO interview today with both the CO and XO of my local LSO. Apparently they liked me because I received a TPU letter from them and they told me that they are going to recommend me highly to the Board. In your collective experience, is this recommendation as good as gold? Obviously the Board could say "no" but is that likely?

Also ... they seem to be playing catch up in that these fine gentlemen thought that the FSO report & TPU letter were to be submitted in paper instead of the new online portal. Anyone have any experience with this? I told them I would call down to JARO this week to see what's what and would get back to them. They're easy going for Army at this LSO and that suits me just fine. Anyway, pretty psyched about the recommendation in any case.

nickc321
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Re: Military Law

Postby nickc321 » Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:57 am

I received a very favorable recommendation from my FSO and I was waitlisted with the Army despite be selected by the Air Force. I would think that without a good recommendation from your FSO you are dead in the water, but a good recommendation itself is not going to get you selected. My experience was with applying to active duty with the Army so reserve selection may be different. Another note: when you are waitlisted in the Army for active duty they offer you a commission as a reserve officer if you wanted to try that route.

Gamble426
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Re: Military Law

Postby Gamble426 » Mon Jun 07, 2010 2:36 pm

Hello,
I'm wanting to join the ROTC and still go to law school after I graduate. I have several options on how I can do this ....
1.I can delay my obligation until after law school become a jag and then go on active duty for Four years and then move to the private sector. At which point I would be 30
2. I can delay my obligation until after law school and become a jag "reserve" for 8 years.
3. I can serve my full obligation in the Army (4 years) then go to lawschool. At which point I would be 26.

However, Im having a hard time determining which is the best for what I want to do...Which is corporate law and im not sure how law firms especially those who are large view military service. I realize if I choose option 1 it will disqualify me from the on campus interviews, which would be very beneficial. Option three on the other hand would put me graduating law school at 29 which seems to be alright, but it puts me at a much higher risk of facing direct combat in the military which I'm not to keen with.

On that note, Its not that I want to take advantage of the government I'm largely considering my family.

Secondly any advice or perspective into how you corporate lawyers view military service or any one who has been a JAG and is now a private lawyer I would love to hear your thoughts... any of you please give your thoughts especially those who are going through the jag program because I would love to talk more with you about the JAG program due to how hard it is to get specific information about it, for instance I have extensively researched jags for the past week and still have most of my original questions. For instance the post about interview horror stories. While i would never say dude....or want the job for an easy 9-5 I must admit im not sure exactly what a JAG does i have searched through the entire ARMY, NAVY, and AIr Force they all have extremely general descriptions that encompass virtually anything!

TenaciousD
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Re: Military Law

Postby TenaciousD » Mon Jun 07, 2010 4:21 pm

I'll chime in only as to my particular background/expertise:

Gamble426 wrote:Secondly any advice or perspective into how you corporate lawyers view military service or any one who has been a JAG and is now a private lawyer I would love to hear your thoughts... any of you please give your thoughts especially those who are going through the jag program because I would love to talk more with you about the JAG program due to how hard it is to get specific information about it, for instance I have extensively researched jags for the past week and still have most of my original questions. For instance the post about interview horror stories. While i would never say dude....or want the job for an easy 9-5 I must admit im not sure exactly what a JAG does i have searched through the entire ARMY, NAVY, and AIr Force they all have extremely general descriptions that encompass virtually anything!


I am a litigator at a big, prestigious corporate law firm. I was a top graduate of a T10 school. I am currently in the application pipeline for Air Force and Navy. I speak only for myself--please assume that no man, woman, child, or agency supports my statements.

IMHO, it is much more common (albeit still very rare) to see BIGLAW-->JAG than JAG-->BIGLAW. Truth be told, the skillsets developed by the armed forces aren't needed by most biglaw firms ever; if they are, it is rarely and will be provided by the highest-levels of the firm. Associates with dozens of jury trials under their belt are rare, but that's not a problem: no bigfirm client wants someone with that little seniority calling the shots. When big money or corporate livelihood is on the line, they'll pay the marginal difference between your absurd rate (e.g. $550/hour like me) and the partner's (e.g. $1000/hour). And, I suspect, having associates with that much experience has lots of other negative effects, including lower morale for the particular associate in question (less meaningful work) and lower morale for other associates (your presence has a blinder-cancelling effect).

There might be smaller firms (perhaps even smaller, more nimble biglaw-esque firms) that see the comparative advantage in having some well-trained judge advocates on staff. But BIGLAW is not Moneyball. There is an almost overwhelming inertia that keeps firms doing things as they always have. BIGLAW recruiting is, by and large, a joke; 80% of the decision is made based on school and grades, 15% on a firm's preference of the big-3 extracurriculars, and 5% on a substanceless feel-you-out chat. Everyone knows this is inefficient, but the point isn't to find the best fit but rather to find suitable warm bodies. It's an open secret that no one cares to remedy. As such, all of the value inherent in JAG service specifically is likely to be overlooked.

It's rare to see the BIGLAW --> JAG route, but I know many more people in that boat. Why do we leave the plush, highly-sought after jobs? Because we want something better--more meaningful work, more substance, more responsibility, more connection to a mission. Perhaps this is the real reason that you don't see the JAG-->BIGLAW route: it's hard to explain why someone would start out in JAG and then move onto BIGLAW other than money. And that's not a very compelling interview pitch.

While I don't think you'll find many, if any, 4-and-out JAGs becoming midlevels at VAULT 100 firms, the situation could be right to bring in a more experienced (10+) JAG at the counsel/partner level if (1) the experience match was perfect, and (2) you can bring a book of business. But I'd say even considering that at this point is putting several carts before an overworked horse. It's overly simplistic, but the truth of the matter is this: you're at the stage of your life where you can't avoid closing some doors with the choices you make. You can't tell for sure which ones you'll be closing and which one's you'll be opening by taking a particular job--all you can do is determine if that job is one you want. If it is, great; if not, don't take it in an effort to climb some imaginary mental ladder.

As far as preparing for the interviewing process: don't sweat the small stuff. Be sincere and enthusiastic, have an honest, sincerely-held reason for wanting to join, and don't say anything false. It's much worse to say you want to do something JAGs don't do than to be a little opaque in responding. In other words, I wouldn't go in talking about mergers and acquisitions/ERISA/sports agency contracts, but stick to "trial experience," "international law," and other things that (1) you know JAGs do, and (2) you want to do with them. No one expects you to be fluent in all manner of internal bueracracy; just be conversant enough to understand how JAGs fit into the big picture and the types of law they practice. How you get assignments/the size of case teams/how you deal with unruly legalmen--these bits of the practice will come if and when they need to.

Good luck in whatever you chose to do.

Gamble426
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Re: Tenacious

Postby Gamble426 » Mon Jun 07, 2010 4:57 pm

Thank you Tenacious,
I don't know if this changes any of your comments but I'm planning on going to a T15 school specifically UT although SMU was also in consideration. I'm also a very serious student and plan on doing what it takes to succeed. I was also planning on studying corporate law and contracts. I'm not really wanting to go the JAG route for experience so much as I am looking to serve and to be honest the financial benefits of having the rest of my Undergraduate paid for. I would love to pick your brain a little more on this subject. My take wasn't so much as what I could offer a law firm in terms of experience but rather the leadership and work ethic developed in the service. Im not sure if it still exists and forgive me people if I offend any one here but, it use to be that being an officer in the service was considered very honorable and prestigious as well as "classy". For instance forgive the analogy but take Animal Farm for instance or the Kennedy's these are examples of very well to do people in Service to become an officer. Anymore it doesn't seem like this concept exists. In the early days of our nation one of the only ways of becoming a gentlemen was service as officer and sometimes a classical education (Alexander Hamilton). My question to you Tenacious is are there senior partners from the older generations that would look at a candidate such as that and view these qualities and do you think if I were to go to a top 15 law school and maintain competitive grades they would then consider those factors alongside of my service. I know I'm asking a lot of you and I know that every situation and every firm differs but if you could give me the best answer as a corporate lawyer using your perception of the corporate world and the corporate law firm psyche I would be very grateful. After all I have spoken with these men who maintained low 3.0s and get into second teir law schools and then do marginal work and I assure you that I'm not this person.

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Eagle
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Re: Military Law

Postby Eagle » Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:10 pm

Awesome words of advice, Tenacious D.

@ Gamble:

First off, don't disparage 2nd tier law schools. If you do JAG, many of your peers will come from 2nd tier law schools and below.

As for making the transition from JAG to biglaw, you have to understand how big law hiring works. Biglaw associates are usually picked up from law school OCI programs, judicial clerkships, or prestigious governmental agencies such as the DOJ. It's not a matter of doing JAG for 4 years, mailing your resume to a patriotic partner at a big firm, and suddenly scoring an offer. Big law firms are gigantic bureaucracies and rarely hire outside their normal channels. JAG to DOJ to biglaw white collar defense is possible. JAG to Army Corps of Engineers to biglaw environmental law seems possible. I can't think of any route for JAG to corporate law.

As for big law to JAG, there is a current Army JAG who made the switch from NYC transactional biglaw and has been fielding questions: --LinkRemoved--.

If you want to strive for the "best of both worlds," it might be feasible to be an Army JAG reserve and biglaw associate at the same time. I don't know much about this option, but it seems possible in theory. To get an idea of what a JAG does, you might consider an internship with a JAG branch in the summer following your first year of law school. This would not entail any long-term commitment and would allow you to participate in your school's OCI at the beginning of your 2L year (where you could secure a big law summer associate gig for the summer after your 2L year).

Connelly
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Re: Military Law

Postby Connelly » Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:29 pm

Is there any kind of mapping of # of JA's to locations in any of the branches? For instance, 35 JA's at one post, 3 at another, etc. I'm attempting to compare the likely options in the Army and Air Force.

This thread is one of the best sources of info on this subject on the internet, but it is massive. It would be great if TLS could provide us with a wiki for this that could be updated.

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Paichka
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Re: Military Law

Postby Paichka » Mon Jun 07, 2010 9:25 pm

Connelly,

I can hook you up with that if you can wait until I get to work tomorrow. Army JAGs get a phone roster, updated yearly, with every JAG in the service and where they're stationed, organized by post.

However, off the top of my head, your likely locations for first post are:
1. Fort Bragg, NC
2. Fort Stewart, GA
3. Fort Lewis, WA
4. Fort Hood, TX
5. Fort Campbell, KY

Those are the largest posts in the Army, and have the biggest JAG offices. Fort Sill, OK; Fort Knox, KY; Fort Jackson, SC are also huge, but they're training bases...some classes get more assignments from those posts. It all depends on where the Army needs bodies at any given grad cycle. The fun bases -- Hawaii, Germany, Colorado, Alaska -- are very difficult to get. Korea is more hit or miss -- some cycles slots to Korea go like hotcakes, some cycles the JAG school can't give them away.

Your typical Division level JAG office has:

1 x Staff Judge Advocate (usually a Colonel)
1 x Deputy (usually a Lieutenant Colonel)
1 x Chief of Military Justice (usually a Major)
1 x Chief of Administrative Law (usually a Lieutenant Colonel, sometimes a Major)
1 x Chief of Legal Assistance (a civilian in my office)
1 x Chief of Operational Law (usually a senior Captain)
1 x Chief of Claims (a civilian in my office)

In each of those offices, you'll have one or three worker bees, typically junior Captains. A trial defense office will have three or more people in it -- a Senior Defense Counsel (a major, usually) and two or more worker bees.

So you're looking at between 5 and 10 positions for lieutenants and junior captains in a fully staffed Division JAG office. Each Brigade will also have a JAG officer assigned as the Brigade Judge Advocate, but that is a job for a senior captain. A direct commissionee will not get that job straight out of the basic course.

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GIBilled
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Re: Military Law

Postby GIBilled » Mon Jun 07, 2010 10:27 pm

colemf wrote:Does anyone know what the stats are for Air Force JAG going to the "Front Lines" or at a camp near the action? While I understand there is a sort of rotation of responsibilties, I really would like to be in the thick of things at least at some point during my 4 years, if possible, or is this more of an Army JAG thing?



ARMY JAG BRO. WE GO THE DISTANCE. USUALLY OPERATE ON SMALL KILL TEAMS WITH 2-3 GUYS ON REMOTE MOUNTAIN SIDES. WHEN THE TALIBAN ATTACK ARMY JAG IS THERE TO SCARE THEM AWAY WITH BIG LEGAL WORDS AND THREATS OF LEGAL JUSTICE. DONT GO AF, GO ARMY.

colemf
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Re: Military Law

Postby colemf » Mon Jun 07, 2010 10:32 pm

GIBilled wrote:
colemf wrote:Does anyone know what the stats are for Air Force JAG going to the "Front Lines" or at a camp near the action? While I understand there is a sort of rotation of responsibilties, I really would like to be in the thick of things at least at some point during my 4 years, if possible, or is this more of an Army JAG thing?



ARMY JAG BRO. WE GO THE DISTANCE. USUALLY OPERATE ON SMALL KILL TEAMS WITH 2-3 GUYS ON REMOTE MOUNTAIN SIDES. WHEN THE TALIBAN ATTACK ARMY JAG IS THERE TO SCARE THEM AWAY WITH BIG LEGAL WORDS AND THREATS OF LEGAL JUSTICE. DONT GO AF, GO ARMY.


Yea...I believe you completely missed what I was getting at but w/e.

Army2Law
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Re: Military Law

Postby Army2Law » Mon Jun 07, 2010 10:37 pm

If you really wanted to be "in the thick of things" you'd want to be in a combat arms position, not JAG. You'll be on a big base most of the time dealing with the legality of reconstruction contracts and assorted disciplinary issues with soldiers along with whatever else might come along and will possibly leave the base a handful of times to assist with prosecution of insurgents in local courts, but that's a big rarity.

Army2Law
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Re: Military Law

Postby Army2Law » Mon Jun 07, 2010 10:42 pm

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2007/ ... aq_071113/

Stats show that members of the Air Force deployed to the Middle East are 1/4 as likely to die than civilians in the US. I can only imagine the incidence of death due to hostile action for Air Force JAG Officers is even lower.

colemf
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Re: Military Law

Postby colemf » Mon Jun 07, 2010 11:09 pm

Again, I wasn't talking about going in anywhere guns blazing or even carrying a weapon in daily operations; "in the think of things" in a completely subjective phrase which you two have evidently mangled into something that I had no intention of conveying (Probably my fault), I simply meant do Air Force JAGs serve in any manor besides the standard Air Force bases around the world, perhaps where current Air Force operations are happening, my question was answered and if you two would bother reading the full text y'all would have relized this and we all could have saved ourselfs from this annoying episode.

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GIBilled
Posts: 38
Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 2:15 pm

Re: Military Law

Postby GIBilled » Tue Jun 08, 2010 1:31 am

colemf wrote:Again, I wasn't talking about going in anywhere guns blazing or even carrying a weapon in daily operations; "in the think of things" in a completely subjective phrase which you two have evidently mangled into something that I had no intention of conveying (Probably my fault), I simply meant do Air Force JAGs serve in any manor besides the standard Air Force bases around the world, perhaps where current Air Force operations are happening, my question was answered and if you two would bother reading the full text y'all would have relized this and we all could have saved ourselfs from this annoying episode.


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