Military Law

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 27, 2017 10:10 pm

usn26 wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:does anyone in the january class know when we actually commission? and is there a procedure for us to pay for the uniform/equipment...like is an advance on wages possible....


You are expected to pay for your uniforms and equipment on your own, no advanced wages. You will technically officially commission your first week of DCC (this is different from your Reserve commission they require you to do before you go to DCC and to get your orders).


ok thank you, ended up going USAA career starter loan route!


Do they have the Military Star thing at DCC?


what does the military star entail?

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 27, 2017 11:11 pm

3L AF DAP selectee here. Does anybody know when you commission and get your assignment for USAF? Is it after you're medically qualified or after your pass the bar?

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 27, 2017 11:53 pm

Anonymous User wrote:3L AF DAP selectee here. Does anybody know when you commission and get your assignment for USAF? Is it after you're medically qualified or after your pass the bar?


After both. Then your date of commissioning for active duty will be the date you start traveling to COT.

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usn26
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Re: Military Law

Postby usn26 » Thu Dec 28, 2017 12:54 am

Anonymous User wrote:
usn26 wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:does anyone in the january class know when we actually commission? and is there a procedure for us to pay for the uniform/equipment...like is an advance on wages possible....


You are expected to pay for your uniforms and equipment on your own, no advanced wages. You will technically officially commission your first week of DCC (this is different from your Reserve commission they require you to do before you go to DCC and to get your orders).


ok thank you, ended up going USAA career starter loan route!


Do they have the Military Star thing at DCC?


what does the military star entail?


At Navy OCS they let you open a Military Star account at the uniform shop, which I guess was like a charge account because you put all $2k+ on the card and they gave you a conveniently-timed 10% discount on the first purchase. This was 7 years ago so idk if that's still a thing or if it's unique to Newport.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:17 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:3L AF DAP selectee here. Does anybody know when you commission and get your assignment for USAF? Is it after you're medically qualified or after your pass the bar?


After both. Then your date of commissioning for active duty will be the date you start traveling to COT.


Let me clarify on this:

You will go through MEPS at some point during your 3L. A lifetime ago, I was picked up by the August board in the very beginning of my 3L (back when the boards were every other month) and ultimately went to MEPS in October-ish.

You will commission (take the oath and execute the AF Form 133) after you are sworn into the bar (for me, it was maybe 2 weeks later). This is the date for your DIEMS, Date of Initial Entry into Military Service (I have also seen this called DIEUS, Date of Initial Entry into Uniformed Service). It is also the date by which they will measure years of service (your anniversary with the military).

You switch over from the inactive reserves to active duty on the day you depart for COT. You will get your orders and all the other paperwork after you commission but before you leave for COT.

In respect to when you get your assignment - I am not sure if it has changed at all but I received mine within a few days of notifying JAX that I had passed the bar (I called and then emailed the PDF of the pass results from my state bar for verification).

It is all confusing, so don't worry if it does not all make sense now. And hold on to your butts if you all ever transition into the reserves - it gets even worse.

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howell
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Re: Military Law

Postby howell » Thu Dec 28, 2017 6:59 pm

Patrick Bateman wrote:And hold on to your butts if you all ever transition into the reserves - it gets even worse.

I know you have at least addressed post-JAG job hunting, but information on getting out and/or transferring to the reserves would be beneficial to a lot of JAGs. Have you found any good sources of info for that?

I'm still AD, but I am planning my switch to the reserves, and it's difficult to find people who are knowledgeable on this, because it's mostly me tracking down reservists who have day jobs. I have found a few to help, but the complete lack of practical guidance on this process is certainly par for the course. This thread was the best source of info on the JAG hiring process I found on the Internet. I wouldn't be surprised if the information on getting out was equally difficult to find.

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:08 pm

howell wrote:
Patrick Bateman wrote:And hold on to your butts if you all ever transition into the reserves - it gets even worse.

I know you have at least addressed post-JAG job hunting, but information on getting out and/or transferring to the reserves would be beneficial to a lot of JAGs. Have you found any good sources of info for that?

I'm still AD, but I am planning my switch to the reserves, and it's difficult to find people who are knowledgeable on this, because it's mostly me tracking down reservists who have day jobs. I have found a few to help, but the complete lack of practical guidance on this process is certainly par for the course. This thread was the best source of info on the JAG hiring process I found on the Internet. I wouldn't be surprised if the information on getting out was equally difficult to find.


There are no good sources out there outside of other reservists you can network with/mine for information [though let me say, JAR and the other reserve entities are really improving things - it is much better than it has been and I think things are going in the right direction administratively]. At the end of the day, it is basically no different than the 0Ls on this board looking for information on how to become a JAG - you are pretty much starting from scratch with no how-to guide. I owe everything in terms of my transition to the reserves to incredibly supportive active duty/GS supervisors at my reserve assignment (which was conveniently, thanks to them lobbying for me, the active duty assignment I was in when I separated) and the absolutely amazing collection of reservists we had at my office that went out of their way to help me through everything. My ability to land a solid civilian job and hit the ground running in the reserves is truly thanks to the half dozen current reservists that dedicated a lot of their time to help.

So that's the bad news. The good news is that I'm obviously happy to help with three years in the reserve side of the house. Feel free to PM me or if you have broader questions that might be helpful for others down the road, follow up to this and I'll do my best to address them on the forum.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jan 02, 2018 4:48 pm

thxrho wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:205th-

I missed the conference call last week/2 weeks ago- can anyone fill me in?

PM me with your phone number, I can call you and give the overview pretty quickly.


do you mind just posting a few bullet points (sorry) I'm out of the country until the 6th

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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jan 02, 2018 11:57 pm

For anyone in the upcoming DCC class, have you been able to arrange a flight to Georgia using your orders? Thanks for any information/help.

thxrho
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Re: Military Law

Postby thxrho » Wed Jan 03, 2018 10:13 am

Anonymous User wrote:
thxrho wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:205th-

I missed the conference call last week/2 weeks ago- can anyone fill me in?

PM me with your phone number, I can call you and give the overview pretty quickly.


do you mind just posting a few bullet points (sorry) I'm out of the country until the 6th


Sure. Here are the major points:
1. Purchase and break-in boots in advance. Both the DCC and OBC cadre recommend that you have boots ready to go when you arrive at DCC. We will be doing a lot of walking while at Ft. Benning.

2. Get copies of all important documents. The welcome letter from OBC (via email) and the instructions provided by DCC (http://www.benning.army.mil/infantry/19 ... ?02MAY2016) both include a list of documents to bring with you and keep on your person during in-processing. In-processing will take up the bulk of the first week of training, so expect a lot of "hurry up and wait" but do your part by coming prepared with the necessary paperwork.

3. [Optional] Create an "I Love Me Book". Collect originals and copies of all important documents and keep these in a binder that you bring with you from duty station to duty station. This is a career tip that may help you apply for future opportunities. Imagine a scenario where there's a short deadline to apply for a unique opportunity: while others are scrambling to locate originals of, e.g., spouses' birth certificate, you're submitting your application in full with no sweat. Note that this I Love Me Book is not supposed to take the place of your personal/household copies of the same important documents. Also, if you don't compile it prior to arrival at Benning you can make it later; it just makes sense to put it together while you're handling the other documents.

4. [Suggested] Purchase a copy of the Army Officer's Guide and read relevant sections. This was suggested by OBC cadre. Due to the short length of our introduction into the Army, we are necessarily going to miss out on learning certain things. The cadre recommend using the Army Officer's Guide as a personal study tool to help you ensure you're knowledgeable about basic Army information. The specific sections recommended were "Customs and Courtesies", the JAG Corps Mission, and to learn the Army Song. [My note: these three should be available through other sources online for your study while abroad]

5. Tricare insurance coverage starts on 7 JAN, but don't cancel your private insurance just yet. Apparently we will be "covered" by Tricare starting on 7 JAN, but we won't be able to use this insurance until we've gone through some sort of processing. I was not clear on how long that would take or when it would occur. The bottom-line recommendation was to not cancel your insurance until you've been processed. If you have a dependent/spouse who needs to use their coverage sooner than "TBD," you should let the DCC cadre know and they will help move you to the front of that line.

6. Uniforms. Both DCC and OBC have provided lists of uniforms to purchase. The last instruction was that uniforms may be purchased after arrival at Ft. Benning, but if you wish to purchase uniforms prior to arrival you should use the list sent out by OBC. (There are minor differences between the lists.) Uniforms can be purchased on many bases, so there may be one near you, or you can use the "Shop My Exchange" website, though it may be too late for that. You should not purchase the Army Service Uniform (ASU) until you arrive at Benning, where the DCC cadre will assist. As discussed in a prior post, financial responsibility for purchasing the uniforms rests fully on you.

7. Prepare physically. Physical fitness will play a role in each phase of training, and the more ready you are the better your experience will be.

8. Final Point: The cadre are there to help. Reiterated throughout the call was that the DCC and OBC cadre are available to assist if you have any questions. I believe the relevant contact info is available on the DCC and OBC welcome letters.

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Re: Military Law

Postby Cmoney $$ » Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:09 pm

thxrho wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
thxrho wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:205th-

I missed the conference call last week/2 weeks ago- can anyone fill me in?

PM me with your phone number, I can call you and give the overview pretty quickly.


do you mind just posting a few bullet points (sorry) I'm out of the country until the 6th


Sure. Here are the major points:
1. Purchase and break-in boots in advance. Both the DCC and OBC cadre recommend that you have boots ready to go when you arrive at DCC. We will be doing a lot of walking while at Ft. Benning.

2. Get copies of all important documents. The welcome letter from OBC (via email) and the instructions provided by DCC (http://www.benning.army.mil/infantry/19 ... ?02MAY2016) both include a list of documents to bring with you and keep on your person during in-processing. In-processing will take up the bulk of the first week of training, so expect a lot of "hurry up and wait" but do your part by coming prepared with the necessary paperwork.

3. [Optional] Create an "I Love Me Book". Collect originals and copies of all important documents and keep these in a binder that you bring with you from duty station to duty station. This is a career tip that may help you apply for future opportunities. Imagine a scenario where there's a short deadline to apply for a unique opportunity: while others are scrambling to locate originals of, e.g., spouses' birth certificate, you're submitting your application in full with no sweat. Note that this I Love Me Book is not supposed to take the place of your personal/household copies of the same important documents. Also, if you don't compile it prior to arrival at Benning you can make it later; it just makes sense to put it together while you're handling the other documents.

4. [Suggested] Purchase a copy of the Army Officer's Guide and read relevant sections. This was suggested by OBC cadre. Due to the short length of our introduction into the Army, we are necessarily going to miss out on learning certain things. The cadre recommend using the Army Officer's Guide as a personal study tool to help you ensure you're knowledgeable about basic Army information. The specific sections recommended were "Customs and Courtesies", the JAG Corps Mission, and to learn the Army Song. [My note: these three should be available through other sources online for your study while abroad]

5. Tricare insurance coverage starts on 7 JAN, but don't cancel your private insurance just yet. Apparently we will be "covered" by Tricare starting on 7 JAN, but we won't be able to use this insurance until we've gone through some sort of processing. I was not clear on how long that would take or when it would occur. The bottom-line recommendation was to not cancel your insurance until you've been processed. If you have a dependent/spouse who needs to use their coverage sooner than "TBD," you should let the DCC cadre know and they will help move you to the front of that line.

6. Uniforms. Both DCC and OBC have provided lists of uniforms to purchase. The last instruction was that uniforms may be purchased after arrival at Ft. Benning, but if you wish to purchase uniforms prior to arrival you should use the list sent out by OBC. (There are minor differences between the lists.) Uniforms can be purchased on many bases, so there may be one near you, or you can use the "Shop My Exchange" website, though it may be too late for that. You should not purchase the Army Service Uniform (ASU) until you arrive at Benning, where the DCC cadre will assist. As discussed in a prior post, financial responsibility for purchasing the uniforms rests fully on you.

7. Prepare physically. Physical fitness will play a role in each phase of training, and the more ready you are the better your experience will be.

8. Final Point: The cadre are there to help. Reiterated throughout the call was that the DCC and OBC cadre are available to assist if you have any questions. I believe the relevant contact info is available on the DCC and OBC welcome letters.


Recruiter here. If anyone would like a free copy of the Army Officer Guide, I can send you one as I have a storage room full of them (folks shipping off to DCC only please). Also, please be careful when purchasing uniforms. Please use Army Regulation 670-1, and follow all fitting guidelines. There is nothing worse than spending hundreds of dollars on Uniforms and not having them fit correctly. I would follow the suggestion of this quoted post on the ASU. Although the staff at military clothing stores are pretty knowledgeable, they are not responsible for selling you the wrong items. Most items are not exchangeable once used. I'd be happy to point anyone in the right direction in regards to uniforms. You will need at minimum 2 sets of OCP (combat uniforms) and one full set of the APFU (pt uniform). Follow all guidelines on boots as wearing unauthorized boots is a sure way to waste $200. (Some nike or oakley boots are very expensive and don't meet guidelines).

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:38 pm

Based on Howell’s post a bit back, and that I am actively procrastinating at work, I wanted to jot down a couple thoughts for those AD folks considering the reserves. This is going to be pretty Air Force specific.

1. Should I be thinking about the reserves: 100% yes, you should. It is a great form of supplemental income, allows you to stay plugged into the JAG Corps (you will likely miss it more than you realize), and can provide some nice balance from your civilian work (sick of your boss? Need a break? Get on orders and go do something different for a few weeks/months – USERRA has your back). For me it has also had the benefit of continuing to develop my resume – as a reservist, I’ve served in the appellate shop, as a trial litigation instructor, and now in a leadership position. That both adds to and diversifies my skill sets, something that has been helpful for me.

If you become a Fed on the civilian side, you get 15 days of Military Leave each year in addition to annual leave and sick leave. This amounts to a minimum of 3 weeks of “double dipping” in which you get your Fed AND Military paycheck. That is a solid chunk of money each year.

Feds can also “buy back” their military time for their Federal retirement (FERS) – that means you can retroactively contribute to your retirement from your military years and get retirement credit for those years. For example, I bought back my six years on AD, meaning that after I serve as a Fed for 20 years, I am actually going to retire as someone with 26 years of service. That can add up.

Also, all of your PCS going-away gifts and other military SWAG will look really impressive to civilians in your office. So, there’s that.

2. How does actually being a reservist work? There are three flavors of reserve service (the technical term of AGR – Air Guard & Reserve):

i. Category A: You are likely a DSJA or SJA that is attached to a dedicated reserve Wing that is very likely going to be in some form of driving distance from where you live. You function a lot like folks in the Air Guard in terms of having a drill weekend each month and then your two weeks. You are never totally off the clock, even if not drilling, but the benefit is that you are serving close-ish to home. Another big benefit is that you are going to be doing leadership things, which looks really good for promotion boards. While most of the regular Air Force reservists are Cat A, it is the minority for JAGs – I will admit I am not as knowledgeable about the actual day-to-day life of Cat A.

ii. Category B (a/k/a IMA ): This is the type of reservist that most AF JAGs are going to be familiar with and how most reservists serve (me included). You are attached to an Active Duty unit and are there to help them out when needed, e.g., during the summer PCS season when there are gaps in manning or someone gets deployed and they need a body for a few weeks.

You end up owing 24 total days a year – it will depend on your unit and SJA on how these days are actually used. 12 of them (your Annual Tour, AT) has to be served all together. The other 12 (Inactive Duty Training, IDTs) can be broken up or served consecutively with your AT. You can also telework IDTs, depending on your office.

You can also do more days, known as MPA tours – this can be at your assigned unit or any other unit that needs assistance and can be for days or months. Generally, the more days you serve is what makes you more competitive for promotion compared to folks that serve only the minimum.

Most new reservists are going to be attached to a base legal office – that can be a mixed bag in my experience. Some SJAs use reservists well, which enables the reservist to get good experience, that leads to good OPR bullets, which leads to good OPRs, which leads to promotions. Some SJAs , however, do not and that can make things more challenging.

Unlike in the past, due to AFJAG Reserve manning being at over 100%, we are now moving assignments every 2-3 years like the active duty folks – being able to homestead at a single base is no longer an option. This means you need to be prepared to be attached to some unit that may not be convenient or desirable – you may also get attached to somewhere really fun and nice.

iii. Air National Guard – like Cat A, but you are part of a state Guard. There are no doubt folks on this board that can speak far better on the Guard but one thing I will note is that you obviously get to stay in that state for your duty. The other benefit is that promotions can be much faster – rank is assigned to a particular position, meaning if you take that position, you get that rank. You, a junior Major, get selected to replace your current boss, who is a Lt Col. You, suddenly, are now a Lt Col. That cuts the other way however as well – if the folks above you are not moving out, you may not be moving up quickly.

3. Promotions?

At least for Cat A/Cat B, it is every 7 years. You will meet promotion boards like when you are on AD. I put on Major in the reserves 7 years to the day after I put on Captain on active duty and if selected for Lt Col down the road, will put on 7 years from my DOR for Major.

There are opportunities for what amounts to “below the zone” as well – I know folks that have promoted around the 5 year mark. Promoting to Major and Lt Col is competitive but attainable if you are checking the right boxes (ACSC is #1, along with making sure you meet your minimum required service each year – as mentioned, doing additional MPA tours is always a plus but that can be hard depending on professional and personal circumstances). Selection to O6 is both a shitshow and a general mystery to me – I think the 2017 board selected 3 of 22 “in the zone.” That is mitigated by the fact that you can keep competing “above the zone” for multiple years (the up and out rule does not really apply).

4. Deploying?

I can only speak to Cat Bs but not likely – you can get put on the volunteer list but there are only like 3-4 spots each year, all forecasted and filled well in advance. Every now and then they need a backfill that allows for a short-notice opportunity, but I have only seen a few of those.

5. Anything I hate?

All of the annual requirements – all of those headaches from active duty like fitness testing, CBTs (which seem to keep growing), and all the other flavor of the month trainings that spring up are still in your life in the reserves. As I noted above, most of the Air Force Reserves are Cat A – that means there are set dates to drill in which everyone is together at their reserve base. This makes it easy to do training X, medical appointment Y, and all the other requirements.

However, when you are a Cat B, your unit may be far away (let’s say, Germany) and you may or may not be close to another installation. HQ will invent some training that must be conducted in person on a short notice suspense – but you are not going to be on orders at your unit for months. Because almost everyone outside of the JAGC is not Cat B, no one seems to remember the Cat Bs and the challenges we can face. Things work themselves out eventually but headaches never the less.

Also, completing your PME (ACSC, etc) is a massive time suck for which you do not get compensated – you get points for all of your coursework, which contributes to your retirement, but it is still a significant burden.

That all said – the things I enjoy and appreciate about my reserve service vastly outweigh the headaches.

Hopefully that helps some of you out.

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howell
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Re: Military Law

Postby howell » Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:54 pm

Patrick, first, thank you so much for that. This is a great addition to the thread for many of us here.

Patrick Bateman wrote:Feds can also “buy back” their military time for their Federal retirement (FERS) – that means you can retroactively contribute to your retirement from your military years and get retirement credit for those years. For example, I bought back my six years on AD, meaning that after I serve as a Fed for 20 years, I am actually going to retire as someone with 26 years of service. That can add up.

I didn't know until recently that you can double dip with your reserve and federal civilian retirements. I thought you could only apply your AD time to your military retirement or buy it out for your federal retirement, but your AD time can count for both. It got rid of any excuses I had for not staying in the reserves.

i. Category A: You are likely a DSJA or SJA that is attached to a dedicated reserve Wing that is very likely going to be in some form of driving distance from where you live. You function a lot like folks in the Air Guard in terms of having a drill weekend each month and then your two weeks. You are never totally off the clock, even if not drilling, but the benefit is that you are serving close-ish to home. Another big benefit is that you are going to be doing leadership things, which looks really good for promotion boards. While most of the regular Air Force reservists are Cat A, it is the minority for JAGs – I will admit I am not as knowledgeable about the actual day-to-day life of Cat A.

I spoke to a Cat A SJA recently whose base pays for any time he works between UTAs. So if a CC asks him a question and the SJA responds from home, the SJA records the time and then gets paid for it. He has been able to supplement his civilian income quite a bit with this. But certainly YMMV depending on your assignment.

As an IMA, are you able to get paid mileage or lodging costs for any of the times that you work?

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Re: Military Law

Postby Fivedham » Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:44 pm

Regarding DCC for selected Army JAs, is there any sense on how common it is now for a waiver to be granted for prior service officers with no breaks in service? Or am I going to Benning for a few weeks no matter how much I try not to?

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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Military Law

Postby Patrick Bateman » Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:20 pm

howell wrote:Patrick, first, thank you so much for that. This is a great addition to the thread for many of us here.

Patrick Bateman wrote:Feds can also “buy back” their military time for their Federal retirement (FERS) – that means you can retroactively contribute to your retirement from your military years and get retirement credit for those years. For example, I bought back my six years on AD, meaning that after I serve as a Fed for 20 years, I am actually going to retire as someone with 26 years of service. That can add up.

I didn't know until recently that you can double dip with your reserve and federal civilian retirements. I thought you could only apply your AD time to your military retirement or buy it out for your federal retirement, but your AD time can count for both. It got rid of any excuses I had for not staying in the reserves.

i. Category A: You are likely a DSJA or SJA that is attached to a dedicated reserve Wing that is very likely going to be in some form of driving distance from where you live. You function a lot like folks in the Air Guard in terms of having a drill weekend each month and then your two weeks. You are never totally off the clock, even if not drilling, but the benefit is that you are serving close-ish to home. Another big benefit is that you are going to be doing leadership things, which looks really good for promotion boards. While most of the regular Air Force reservists are Cat A, it is the minority for JAGs – I will admit I am not as knowledgeable about the actual day-to-day life of Cat A.

I spoke to a Cat A SJA recently whose base pays for any time he works between UTAs. So if a CC asks him a question and the SJA responds from home, the SJA records the time and then gets paid for it. He has been able to supplement his civilian income quite a bit with this. But certainly YMMV depending on your assignment.

As an IMA, are you able to get paid mileage or lodging costs for any of the times that you work?


Re: the buyback. Yeah, it is pretty excellent. At later middle age, you can have your reserve retirement as an O-5/O-6, your Federal retirement as a GS-15/SES (assuming you are in the DC area where these level of jobs are way easier to get), and your TSP all as retirement revenue streams (to say nothing of social security, assuming the trust fund still exists by then). Like I always tell folks, you won't get rich in the Fed govt or the military, but you can be quite comfortable still working if you play your cards smartly.

Your point regarding the Cat A pay is well noted. On my side of the fence, we are eligible to request "points only" credit for days where we have to do admin or other duties not for pay. This adds to our yearly points total (same as, for example, the points given for completing ACSC). Over the course of years, these additional points only credits can add up for computation of our retirement pay as well as adding to that overall points total that the promotion boards are looking at.

I could probably write what amounts to several single spaced pages on the ass pain and complexities of being paid as an IMA. The short-ish version:

It is all complicated due to the different pots of money from which we get funded. We have all these different duty status that are more or less the same in terms of day to day execution of the job, but have different names and get paid in different ways, because of the fiscal side of things. Generally, for your Annual Tour and MPA tours, you are paid like you are back on active duty. Your BAH/BAS gets punked and you end up with this BS version (still tax free) and your pay is based on grade and years in. IDTs are this whole other confusing thing - if you look up "drill pay" (also relevant to our Cat A and Air Guard folks), you get this lump sum (fully taxed) for each drill period (and because this HAS to be confusing, there are 2 periods for each day). As a Major with over 8 years, a single drill period is worth $220.04. So one IDT day is that amount x2. A drill weekend for a Cat A reservist is that x4.

So that is the "salary" side. For Cat Bs, your travel costs (mileage/air fare) are only covered for your Annual Tour. If you do your IDTs AND your AT together however, your travel for both are effectively covered though - so, if you are geographically separated (stationed in, let's say, Germany), you are effectively stuck taking a full month off of work so you can do your 12 AT days and 12 IDT days (note, this is actually 24 IDT periods because of the two periods a day thing). If you decide to split your AT and IDTs, you are on the hook for travel expenses for your IDTs. I am also pretty sure they will fund a rental car (if necessary) for your AT but again, not for your IDTs. So, while in Germany, you get absolutely screwed into eating half of your rental car costs as well as your weekend lodging (as your weekends are usually not in a duty status for IDTs). We can waste billions into the F-35 but they have screwing reservist pay down to a science.

[I will also note that the current reserve CC for JAGs is now allowing "split tours" where you can basically do one week of your AT w/ some IDTs and then your second week of AT w/ IDTs in separate (2) chunks - this is critical for folks that have a job where a month off is just not an option. That said, it is because the current reserve CC that runs this is absolutely awesome - it could easily go away under the next CC.

And this brings me to the negative of reserve service - opportunity cost. A day you spend on AF orders is a day you are not doing your civilian job. This may hurt your ability to advance as a civilian. A lot of reservist JAGs are EXTREMELY successful in their civilian jobs and find ways to make it work, but it is worth being aware of. I lost out on a chair at a major trial because I was gone playing Air Force. It is way, way easier as a Fed do handle this juggling act. The trial types that end up in the white shoe/white collar law firms I think have a much harder time with the balance, though I have meet some truly exceptional reservists that are killing it on both ends. I, and countless others, have made it work, but just keep it in mind in respect to what your ultimate priorities are.]

The best way to "hack" this system as an IMA is to be in the same geographic area as your assignment - let's say you live in DC and are assigned to Andrews. You have no travel costs, so this AT and IDT distinction is meaningless in terms of reimbursement. You don't have to do your IDTs and AT together, so you have greater flexibility with your schedule (dependent on the needs of your AD unit of course). If you get really lucky, you can have a unit that is happy to have help whenever or via telework and maybe you have a Federal job that lets your have a flex schedule (where every other Friday/Monday is off and you make up that days hours over the other 9 duty days) - you can then take 1 day of military leave on a Thursday, flex Friday, and work on Saturday. You just knocked out 3 IDT days at the cost of only one single military leave day. Not every job will let you thread this needle but if you are clever and have supportive leadership (both civilian job and military), you can really squeeze out some extra money.

Anonymous User
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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:15 pm

Anyone in the January DCC class know anything about hearing screening, medical records, or bringing a DD 1610?

I don't have access to my DODMERB hearing screening or medical records. I have no idea how to fill out the DD1610

Anonymous User
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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 05, 2018 11:45 pm

The cadre will guide us through the 1610. As far as the medical stuff, I think they just want you to bring what you got.

Anonymous User
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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Jan 06, 2018 9:40 am

Went through DCC a few classes ago. Choosing to stay Anon for now....

Fivedham- not common last I heard/saw. Enjoy Georgia.

Uniforms- you will spend a lot of money. Every other day you will be at the PX or commando's. ASUs can get expensive, especially if you buy from MW. If you're brand new, get OCPs as the ACUs are being faded out. That means coyote brown belt/shirt/boots, not desert tan.

Boots- we did not run much in boots at DCC. On land nav days, I clocked 12miles. I've had a few sets of boots and never had a problem with Rocky's. Many friends had their heels torn up by the Nike.

Officer guide- buy it, read it. Super helpful if this is your first attempt at playing soldier. You will still make mistakes and get chastised. Some things only make sense after you get to your unit. It's a learning process

Cadre- mostly were helpful. Occasionally yelled at us. Not too bad.

Food- can you eat a plate of food in 8min or less? Not given a lot of time at the dfac to eat especially in the beginning.

Unit assignment- this can change. Some classmates were moved when we were at OBC. You wear the unit Patch on your left shoulder.

Hard times- you'll get a lot of these whenever you go somewhere. Don't be late. Be 10min early. This will make your student leadership team not want to kill you. They themselves are under a lot of stress.

PT uniform- I'll assume Georgia is cold in January. If authorized to wear your hat, do not forget it. If one person does, no one wears it. Don't sneak in extra thermals under your uniform. If wearing the pants, wear your shorts under them.

MREs- learn to love them. Some classes eat a lot of these. First week you might. Don't eat the gum. Burn the heater off, use it if you feel like it.

Salute- be ready to receive and give salutes. Most of you come in as 1LTs. That means the OCS kids should salute you and call you sir/ma'am. The many privates around Benning should as well. Takes a bit to get comfortable with this.

PT- do your best. Just don't give up. Do not walk. Officers don't give up. You will improve. And you have another 10weeks in Virginia before you get to your unit to get even better. JAG corps loves to run. Yes, the warm up exercises are weird- memorize the correct way to do them anyway.

Death by PowerPoint- lots of time spent in class. Don't fall asleep. Stand in the back before you fall asleep.

Friends- you may want to kill your DCC roommate. I'd advise against that. Some squadmates will become close friends.

Turn your brain off sometimes. This is training. Don't question cadre. Just go where they tell you to.

*All the above is my opinion. I'm sure many would disagree or have other advice. I don't post here often, but I lurk.

Anonymous User
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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Jan 06, 2018 11:26 am

Anonymous User wrote:Went through DCC a few classes ago. Choosing to stay Anon for now....

Fivedham- not common last I heard/saw. Enjoy Georgia.

Uniforms- you will spend a lot of money. Every other day you will be at the PX or commando's. ASUs can get expensive, especially if you buy from MW. If you're brand new, get OCPs as the ACUs are being faded out. That means coyote brown belt/shirt/boots, not desert tan.

Boots- we did not run much in boots at DCC. On land nav days, I clocked 12miles. I've had a few sets of boots and never had a problem with Rocky's. Many friends had their heels torn up by the Nike.

Officer guide- buy it, read it. Super helpful if this is your first attempt at playing soldier. You will still make mistakes and get chastised. Some things only make sense after you get to your unit. It's a learning process

Cadre- mostly were helpful. Occasionally yelled at us. Not too bad.

Food- can you eat a plate of food in 8min or less? Not given a lot of time at the dfac to eat especially in the beginning.

Unit assignment- this can change. Some classmates were moved when we were at OBC. You wear the unit Patch on your left shoulder.

Hard times- you'll get a lot of these whenever you go somewhere. Don't be late. Be 10min early. This will make your student leadership team not want to kill you. They themselves are under a lot of stress.

PT uniform- I'll assume Georgia is cold in January. If authorized to wear your hat, do not forget it. If one person does, no one wears it. Don't sneak in extra thermals under your uniform. If wearing the pants, wear your shorts under them.

MREs- learn to love them. Some classes eat a lot of these. First week you might. Don't eat the gum. Burn the heater off, use it if you feel like it.

Salute- be ready to receive and give salutes. Most of you come in as 1LTs. That means the OCS kids should salute you and call you sir/ma'am. The many privates around Benning should as well. Takes a bit to get comfortable with this.

PT- do your best. Just don't give up. Do not walk. Officers don't give up. You will improve. And you have another 10weeks in Virginia before you get to your unit to get even better. JAG corps loves to run. Yes, the warm up exercises are weird- memorize the correct way to do them anyway.

Death by PowerPoint- lots of time spent in class. Don't fall asleep. Stand in the back before you fall asleep.

Friends- you may want to kill your DCC roommate. I'd advise against that. Some squadmates will become close friends.

Turn your brain off sometimes. This is training. Don't question cadre. Just go where they tell you to.

*All the above is my opinion. I'm sure many would disagree or have other advice. I don't post here often, but I lurk.


I just found out about the swimming portion and I cannot swim...is there any recourse?

thxrho
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jul 28, 2012 6:20 pm

Re: Military Law

Postby thxrho » Sat Jan 06, 2018 11:50 am

Anonymous User wrote:I just found out about the swimming portion and I cannot swim...is there any recourse?


From my read of the requirements, successful completion of the swimming portion is not required - all you have to do to pass is make the attempt. Perhaps this is a requirement you don't pass while at DCC, but you could learn to swim and make the attempt later?

Anonymous User
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Re: Military Law

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:01 pm

We did not have a swimming requirement. This must be new. If it's like any of the other requirements (pt test, ruck, land nav)- they'll work with you til you pass.

Go take a few lessons if you have the time and are worried.

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Navy JAG program question

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:26 am

I'm in the process of scheduling an interview because my bar status is "pending" this would be for the student program. However, they are asking if it is my first time sitting for the bar exam? If it's not, am I not eligible to apply for any programs? thank you for clarifying.

Mccoyology
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:27 pm

Re: Military Law

Postby Mccoyology » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:02 pm

Can anyone confirm if we were prior enlisted if we will be considered an 0-3E?

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usn26
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Re: Military Law

Postby usn26 » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:10 pm

Mccoyology wrote:Can anyone confirm if we were prior enlisted if we will be considered an 0-3E?


With >4y of enlisted service.

ETA: can't confirm from experience, but no idea why it wouldn't work as advertised.

Google "DOD Financial Management Regulation"

Service on active duty or active and inactive duty for training for at least 4 years and 1 day satisfies the over 4 years of service requirement under this section.

Elle in Combat Boots
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:03 pm

Re: Navy JAG program question

Postby Elle in Combat Boots » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:21 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I'm in the process of scheduling an interview because my bar status is "pending" this would be for the student program. However, they are asking if it is my first time sitting for the bar exam? If it's not, am I not eligible to apply for any programs? thank you for clarifying.


If you have taken the bar exam, you cannot apply to the student program. The Direct Appointment program is for applicants who are admitted to practice.




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