Resources to improve interview skills

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Resources to improve interview skills

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:10 am

This post probably applies to lots of us, in that we're not autistic but we struggle on interviews. Say your credentials are very good and as a result you're able to get your foot in the door at some very good firms. But it always falls apart during either the initial interview or the callback. Law firms are a black box when it comes to asking for feedback about why you were rejected. Are there any good resources/ books/ coaches/ self-development courses to improve interviewing skills? Specifically-
- what to talk about substantively?
- how to show that you're "a good cultural fit" (whatever that means)

Frankly, I'm hitting a brick wall on this issue. Obviously I can perform the job and I'm qualified for it but firms continue to reject after one or two rounds of interviews.

worklifewhat

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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby worklifewhat » Wed Nov 07, 2018 6:13 pm

How many rejections have you received? How many years out of law school are you? I think it can be helpful to do prep-interviews with a recruiter and/or trusted friend. Look online at sample questions and how people recommend answering them. Practice speaking your responses out loud...even record yourself so that you can listen to how you sound and how you're presenting. There's no one right way to improve but I think practice does help.

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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:30 pm

worklifewhat wrote:How many rejections have you received? How many years out of law school are you? I think it can be helpful to do prep-interviews with a recruiter and/or trusted friend. Look online at sample questions and how people recommend answering them. Practice speaking your responses out loud...even record yourself so that you can listen to how you sound and how you're presenting. There's no one right way to improve but I think practice does help.


If we include OCI interviews during LS? Hundreds.

If we're solely talking about post-law school interviewing, roughly 30-40 rejections. Many of these open positions fit my resume like a glove.

2.5 years.

The weird part is that friends and career counselors have said that I'm a good speaker. I'm as knowledgeable in my practice areas as any other associate with my level of experience. The one piece of feedback I've gotten is that I come off as very serious and intense. That's kind of an innate personality trait though, haven't figured out how to overcome it.

worklifewhat

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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby worklifewhat » Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:26 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
worklifewhat wrote:How many rejections have you received? How many years out of law school are you? I think it can be helpful to do prep-interviews with a recruiter and/or trusted friend. Look online at sample questions and how people recommend answering them. Practice speaking your responses out loud...even record yourself so that you can listen to how you sound and how you're presenting. There's no one right way to improve but I think practice does help.


If we include OCI interviews during LS? Hundreds.

If we're solely talking about post-law school interviewing, roughly 30-40 rejections. Many of these open positions fit my resume like a glove.

2.5 years.

The weird part is that friends and career counselors have said that I'm a good speaker. I'm as knowledgeable in my practice areas as any other associate with my level of experience. The one piece of feedback I've gotten is that I come off as very serious and intense. That's kind of an innate personality trait though, haven't figured out how to overcome it.


You want to be likable in addition to competent. Do you start interviews with small talk? Do you try to get to know your interviewers a little or are you focused completely on selling yourself?

sparty99

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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby sparty99 » Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:14 am

I have definitely had the same issue and found myself getting job offers at places where I had no interest in the firm or organization because I wasn't nervous or cared that much about the opportunity. But when I interviewed at the places where I really wanted the job, I was too nervous and acted like my life depended on getting the job. I even think some of the interviews, they thought I was too serious and gave canned answers that may have sounded scripted (which in some cases they were, because I prepared my answers). You should as the other person alluded to is relax. This is just a conversation. Pretend the person is your friend. You might be naturally serious or nervous (which I can be too), but try to engage in small talk. Do not be too focused on trying to sell your skills. They will want to know what you have done and what you can do, but they also want to know that you won't be an a-hole, etc.

gaddockteeg

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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby gaddockteeg » Thu Nov 08, 2018 3:18 pm

worklifewhat wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
worklifewhat wrote:How many rejections have you received? How many years out of law school are you? I think it can be helpful to do prep-interviews with a recruiter and/or trusted friend. Look online at sample questions and how people recommend answering them. Practice speaking your responses out loud...even record yourself so that you can listen to how you sound and how you're presenting. There's no one right way to improve but I think practice does help.


If we include OCI interviews during LS? Hundreds.

If we're solely talking about post-law school interviewing, roughly 30-40 rejections. Many of these open positions fit my resume like a glove.

2.5 years.

The weird part is that friends and career counselors have said that I'm a good speaker. I'm as knowledgeable in my practice areas as any other associate with my level of experience. The one piece of feedback I've gotten is that I come off as very serious and intense. That's kind of an innate personality trait though, haven't figured out how to overcome it.


You want to be likable in addition to competent. Do you start interviews with small talk? Do you try to get to know your interviewers a little or are you focused completely on selling yourself?



This is it imo. They already think you're competent or they wouldn't have interviewed you in the first place. Priority A should be on being likeable.

Anonymous User
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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Nov 08, 2018 3:40 pm

gaddockteeg wrote:
worklifewhat wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
worklifewhat wrote:How many rejections have you received? How many years out of law school are you? I think it can be helpful to do prep-interviews with a recruiter and/or trusted friend. Look online at sample questions and how people recommend answering them. Practice speaking your responses out loud...even record yourself so that you can listen to how you sound and how you're presenting. There's no one right way to improve but I think practice does help.


If we include OCI interviews during LS? Hundreds.

If we're solely talking about post-law school interviewing, roughly 30-40 rejections. Many of these open positions fit my resume like a glove.

2.5 years.

The weird part is that friends and career counselors have said that I'm a good speaker. I'm as knowledgeable in my practice areas as any other associate with my level of experience. The one piece of feedback I've gotten is that I come off as very serious and intense. That's kind of an innate personality trait though, haven't figured out how to overcome it.


You want to be likable in addition to competent. Do you start interviews with small talk? Do you try to get to know your interviewers a little or are you focused completely on selling yourself?



This is it imo. They already think you're competent or they wouldn't have interviewed you in the first place. Priority A should be on being likeable.


This question is going to make it seem like I'm on the spectrum, but how do you do that in the context of a legal interview? I usually just talk about my experience as it relates to the open position.

lawdude31

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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby lawdude31 » Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:35 pm

I went to an interview consultant before OCI and I thought it was helpful. But I’m sure there are some who think that would be useless. I thought it was helpful for him to explain to me how best to frame certain responses or experiences.

gaddockteeg

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Re: Resources to improve interview skills

Postby gaddockteeg » Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:52 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
gaddockteeg wrote:
worklifewhat wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
worklifewhat wrote:How many rejections have you received? How many years out of law school are you? I think it can be helpful to do prep-interviews with a recruiter and/or trusted friend. Look online at sample questions and how people recommend answering them. Practice speaking your responses out loud...even record yourself so that you can listen to how you sound and how you're presenting. There's no one right way to improve but I think practice does help.


If we include OCI interviews during LS? Hundreds.

If we're solely talking about post-law school interviewing, roughly 30-40 rejections. Many of these open positions fit my resume like a glove.

2.5 years.

The weird part is that friends and career counselors have said that I'm a good speaker. I'm as knowledgeable in my practice areas as any other associate with my level of experience. The one piece of feedback I've gotten is that I come off as very serious and intense. That's kind of an innate personality trait though, haven't figured out how to overcome it.


You want to be likable in addition to competent. Do you start interviews with small talk? Do you try to get to know your interviewers a little or are you focused completely on selling yourself?



This is it imo. They already think you're competent or they wouldn't have interviewed you in the first place. Priority A should be on being likeable.


This question is going to make it seem like I'm on the spectrum, but how do you do that in the context of a legal interview? I usually just talk about my experience as it relates to the open position.


No worries, I had similar concerns when I first started interviewing at OCI too. I was the worst.

To me, likeable is a combination of some or all of the following: being good-looking/looking your best, being funny/making the interviewer laugh, NOT being type A or too competitive, having an upbeat/positive attitude, not being boring to talk to.

Just rambling off the top of my head, I think the easiest things to do are (1) make sure you look your best. It's unfortunate, but appearance makes a big difference and is prob like 50% of the first impression which itself is like 40% of the entire interview. (2) come in with some energy, like you're excited to talk to me. It makes me feel important which make me want to have you around and I also hate interviewing boring or bored people.

edit: I just realized that you're 2.5 years out. I deleted some stuff that is less relevant now imo.



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