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Anonymous User
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BigFed Admin Law Jobs

Postby Anonymous User » Fri May 18, 2018 7:32 pm

Anyone have a sense of what offices in BigFed agencies focus on administrative law? I'm particularly interested in the financial regulators (SEC, Fed, FDIC, OCC, CFPB).

Also, what are these jobs like? What's the day to day?

Finally, what sorts of credentials does one need to get these jobs?

Anonymous User
Posts: 313760
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: BigFed Admin Law Jobs

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 20, 2018 3:53 pm

Bump. Anyone?

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: BigFed Admin Law Jobs

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 21, 2018 12:51 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Anyone have a sense of what offices in BigFed agencies focus on administrative law? I'm particularly interested in the financial regulators (SEC, Fed, FDIC, OCC, CFPB).

Also, what are these jobs like? What's the day to day?

Finally, what sorts of credentials does one need to get these jobs?


Anon cause I work at the OCC. I am not sure any chief counsel office in a financial regulatory agency is going to primarily focus on admin law. However, I think what you are asking is whether any division within a chief counsel office focuses on admin law. The different legal divisions at the OCC are here: https://www.occ.treas.gov/topics/laws-regulations/about-legal.html My guess is that most of the financial regulators have descriptions of their divisions somewhere online. Just note that the OCC's AIL division is very small and may even be less than five attorneys. My guess it that the most practical option for those interested in admin law would be either a legislative division (LRA in the OCC's case) or a litigation division (as opposed to enforcement). In a legislative division, you'll likely be involved with rulemakings, notice and comment, etc., which obviously requires knowledge of admin law. In litigation, you could be defending agency decisions, which again will touch on some admin law.

As far as what these jobs are like, it is going to depend on the agency and will also depend on what division within that agency you are in. For example, in Enforcement, you will likely be traveling far more than in other divisions and you may be busier if you ever go to trial. Generally, though, the OCC has a great work-life balance, especially when considering counterparts in Big Law. The pay is better than normal government agencies and the benefits are usually better as well. For me, the day to day usually involves writing legal memos, doing legal research, checking email, helping out on various cases, talking with other attorneys, etc.

With respect to credentials, competition for these jobs can be somewhat stiff. I think universally, all of these jobs look for a demonstrated interest in financial services, securities, or whatever the agency concentrates in. This can be developed by internships, journal articles, etc. that show an interest. Depending on the agency, some prefer top tier schools (I'm not from a top tier school), but others really care about your experience and grades. If you are looking for an entry level position, most of these agencies have honors programs for those coming out of school and/or clerkships and will explain what they are looking for. I am not trying to discourage you, but you could see somewhat of a reduction in hiring in the coming years as cost cutting continues. For example, I know the CFPB didn't hire any attorneys last cycle. Hiring can ebb and flow based on politics. If you can't get into an honors program, your best bet is probably to try to get some financial regulation experience at a law firm. If these agencies stop cost cutting and need to hire, they will probably be looking for those with experience.

Anyways, hope this helps and good luck!



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