Employment Lawyers

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Anonymous User
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Employment Lawyers

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 15, 2018 8:59 pm

I got an offer to join an employment law firm representing employees/plaintiffs. I am currently working at a PI firm and want to get an idea of what it's like working at a plaintiff side employment law firm.

For any employment lawyers, what are your typical hours and do you go to court a lot? I spoke with a friend at an employment law firm and was told that she mostly attended mediation conferences.

Anonymous User
Posts: 313986
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Employment Lawyers

Postby Anonymous User » Wed May 16, 2018 3:17 pm

bump

Anonymous User
Posts: 313986
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Employment Lawyers

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 17, 2018 5:33 pm

Plaintiff side employment lawyers spend a lot of time in mediation and settling in general, but I think that’s true of all plaintiffs work. I used to work at a national L&E firm (think Littler/Ogletree/Jackson Lewis/etc.) so I was on the other side but I think it has to do with the prevelence of EPLI, or employer practices liability insurance. Plaintiff employment lawyers know they can milk an insurance company for a decent settlement even on the worst cases. Most large companies have EPLI and the EPLI carrier can force an employer to settle or face partial insurance coverage for their attorneys’ fees and judgments.

The other thing to consider is that employment cases usually don’t have a lot of damages. Title VII has capped damages and lots of state statutes are the same. Other statues like the FMLA don’t allow for compensatory damages. The FLSA allows for liquidated damages, but non-exempt employees generally aren’t making big bucks hourly and end up only getting their employer on the hook for maybe a few thousand bucks in back pay. Of course, the plaintiff lawyer gets to roll in the attorneys fees if they get a hardheaded (or uninsured) defendant.



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