Interests Section When You're a Very Uninteresting Person?

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jkpolk

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Re: Interests Section When You're a Very Uninteresting Person?

Postby jkpolk » Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:24 pm

Cocaine. Also, doing my goddamn job I am a robot built to bill.

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rpupkin

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Re: Interests Section When You're a Very Uninteresting Person?

Postby rpupkin » Fri Dec 01, 2017 6:56 pm

Capitol_Idea wrote:Interests: doing my goddamn job I am a robot built to bill. Also, cocaine.

Here's Capitol Idea signing off on hours for a couple of summer associates:



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Re: Interests Section When You're a Very Uninteresting Person?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:11 pm

drive4showLSAT4dough wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I'll chime in and say something like golf can be really helpful. I was asked about it in about 1/2 my interviews throughout law school, and it was a really good talking point to say I play to 9 or 10 handicap - it would've been even better if I could say I was scratch. Also left on a previous job at a country club in the pro shop for this reason. I think something like craft beer or similar, which a lot of people can have at least a rudimentary level of knowledge about, can be a good talking point.


How long would it take me to learn to play golf well enough to list it on my resume?


3 months to a lifetime depending on coordination and effort


I’m the original anon - I started playing a little in undergrad, and got more serious 2-3 years ago. Pretty athletic background including college baseball. Honestly though if you play more than once or twice or year I think you can put in on there and when asked about it, say you enjoy it and are getting into it more. The more you can say you play (and usually therefore the better you are) the more it’ll help.

ETA the other poster who said not to learn something just to put it on your resume is absolutely right.

lolwat

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Re: Interests Section When You're a Very Uninteresting Person?

Postby lolwat » Fri Dec 01, 2017 7:22 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I’m the original anon - I started playing a little in undergrad, and got more serious 2-3 years ago. Pretty athletic background including college baseball. Honestly though if you play more than once or twice or year I think you can put in on there and when asked about it, say you enjoy it and are getting into it more. The more you can say you play (and usually therefore the better you are) the more it’ll help.


Honestly, for purposes of the resume, you don't have to be great at any of your interests; you just have to actually be interested enough that you can hold a decent conversation about it. It'd certainly help you have a better conversation if it's something you do often and that you're good at, though.

drive4showLSAT4dough

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Re: Interests Section When You're a Very Uninteresting Person?

Postby drive4showLSAT4dough » Thu Dec 07, 2017 11:53 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
drive4showLSAT4dough wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I'll chime in and say something like golf can be really helpful. I was asked about it in about 1/2 my interviews throughout law school, and it was a really good talking point to say I play to 9 or 10 handicap - it would've been even better if I could say I was scratch. Also left on a previous job at a country club in the pro shop for this reason. I think something like craft beer or similar, which a lot of people can have at least a rudimentary level of knowledge about, can be a good talking point.


How long would it take me to learn to play golf well enough to list it on my resume?


3 months to a lifetime depending on coordination and effort


I’m the original anon - I started playing a little in undergrad, and got more serious 2-3 years ago. Pretty athletic background including college baseball. Honestly though if you play more than once or twice or year I think you can put in on there and when asked about it, say you enjoy it and are getting into it more. The more you can say you play (and usually therefore the better you are) the more it’ll help.

ETA the other poster who said not to learn something just to put it on your resume is absolutely right.


Transitioning baseball swing into golf swing / softball dip n rip is a complete interest section



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