Turn ding into an offer?

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
Anonymous User
Posts: 327221
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Turn ding into an offer?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:49 pm

The consensus on TLS is MM and networking if you strike out in law school OCI.

Now I've MMed over 400 firms. TLS folks suggest networking. I'm wondering if it's necessary to network with firms from which I have been dinged. I mean, is there a chance that I can turn a ding into a CB/extra screener/offer? Are there any success stories?

Thanks!

User avatar
UVA2B

Gold
Posts: 3463
Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 10:48 pm

Re: Turn ding into an offer?

Postby UVA2B » Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:59 pm

Are you talking about firms you've interviewed with and been officially rejected, or just radio silence after MM?

If the firm has formally rejected you following an interview, you're unlikely to change their mind (there is still some small benefit in networking in case their summer class doesn't shape up and keeping on their radar, but that's a long shot). But if you just haven't heard anything, you need to be networking heavily in hopes of changing that radio silence into possible interviews.

Legal hiring isn't a uniform process, so what you should be focused on is leveraging contacts at firms where you might want to work by maintaining those contacts (law school alumni, UG alumni, etc.). Ask them to go out for coffee to learn more about their practice, learn more about the firm, etc.

You probably won't turn a "thank you for your interest in XXX firm. You were a competitive candidate, but..." rejection into a CB or offer most of the time, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't continue leveraging every connection you can make with employers to get hired until you have a job.

Good luck!

Anonymous User
Posts: 327221
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Turn ding into an offer?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 17, 2017 11:07 pm

Anonymous User wrote:The consensus on TLS is MM and networking if you strike out in law school OCI.

Now I've MMed over 400 firms. TLS folks suggest networking. I'm wondering if it's necessary to network with firms from which I have been dinged. I mean, is there a chance that I can turn a ding into a CB/extra screener/offer? Are there any success stories?

Thanks!


BLUF: Don't waste your time for this year (assuming you're a 2L). There's a slim chance you could pull it off for next year.

------

If you're looking for a 2L summer job, don't waste your time trying to get hired by firms that have already rejected you. You only have so much free time to do networking, and those places already told you no. Places that rejected you are already completing their hiring anyways.

However, it IS possible to get hired to work post-grad by a firm that has already rejected you during 2L OCI, though that is certainly the exception and not the rule. I recently did this with a ~V50 in a smaller practice group (hence the anonymous post . . . it would be too easy to ID me based on post history). They had rejected me at the screener stage during OCI, but I managed to form a great relationship with some of their associates through a local lawyers' organization. One of their associates went out on a limb for me and got me back in the door with the firm, and that recently converted into an offer for post-grad employment (I'm now a 3L).

This DID take a semi-unique set of circumstances though, which is why I would call it the exception. I summered 2L at a firm just off the AMLAW100, I received an offer to come back, I happened to be a member of the right organization, it just so happened that I really fit in with everyone in the practice group, and there was an associate who was willing to spend some political capital to get me in there. That entire serendipitous chain of events started with me accepting the initial rejection and moving on to find other opportunities, which is what I recommend you do.

That being said, don't turn a cold shoulder to the firms that rejected you. Just . . . don't put much effort into reaching out to them.



Return to “Legal Employment�

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.