Publication Question

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Publication Question

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:04 am

Hi guys,

So I've been fortunate to receive publication offers from one general law review and two secondary journals. The law review is from a T100 school, while the secondary journals are T10, and I was wondering if anyone had advice/experience as to what to do from here, or if there would be a way to convince other "higher ranked" journals to extend offers based on the offers I've already received.

Thanks!

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Re: Publication Question

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:40 am

How many law reviews did you submit to? What service did you use? Scholastica? ExpressO? Just email?

The way this usually works is that you take your best offer and submit an expedite request to the journals that you have not heard back from that includes the details of the best offer. You will usually need to provide them with the name of the journal and the deadline that you have to inform that journal of your decision. How long did the journals give you? Some give longer, some give shorter, but always request a brief extension to let them know if the time period is particularly short (i.e., if they only gave you a week). Sometimes they just can't because of their production schedule. You might have trouble with the expedite requests at this point in the law review submission season as schools aren't back yet and depending on the journal, some will not expedite during certain months. Once you find out whether they'll give you a brief extension, submit your expedite request to journals that are better (don't bother sending the expedite request to the lower ranked journals). You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

Also, the ranking of the school the journal is associated with matters some - you do get better feedback and better editing at the better journals, but a general law review from a lower ranked school may be "better" (higher impact factor, higher readership, etc.) than a secondary journal from a higher ranked school. This can be especially true if the high ranked school has just started the journal you have an acceptance from. You should use the Washington and Lee Law Review Rankings to give you a sense of their relative rankings - http://lawlib.wlu.edu/LJ/index.aspx (limit to US and then click "combined score" and apply).

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TooMuchTuna

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Re: Publication Question

Postby TooMuchTuna » Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:07 am

.
Last edited by TooMuchTuna on Mon Jan 29, 2018 6:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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A. Nony Mouse

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Re: Publication Question

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:31 am

Anonymous User wrote:How many law reviews did you submit to? What service did you use? Scholastica? ExpressO? Just email?

The way this usually works is that you take your best offer and submit an expedite request to the journals that you have not heard back from that includes the details of the best offer. You will usually need to provide them with the name of the journal and the deadline that you have to inform that journal of your decision. How long did the journals give you? Some give longer, some give shorter, but always request a brief extension to let them know if the time period is particularly short (i.e., if they only gave you a week). Sometimes they just can't because of their production schedule. You might have trouble with the expedite requests at this point in the law review submission season as schools aren't back yet and depending on the journal, some will not expedite during certain months. Once you find out whether they'll give you a brief extension, submit your expedite request to journals that are better (don't bother sending the expedite request to the lower ranked journals). You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

Also, the ranking of the school the journal is associated with matters some - you do get better feedback and better editing at the better journals, but a general law review from a lower ranked school may be "better" (higher impact factor, higher readership, etc.) than a secondary journal from a higher ranked school. This can be especially true if the high ranked school has just started the journal you have an acceptance from. You should use the Washington and Lee Law Review Rankings to give you a sense of their relative rankings - http://lawlib.wlu.edu/LJ/index.aspx (limit to US and then click "combined score" and apply).

This is an excellent post.

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Re: Publication Question

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:46 am

Anonymous User wrote:How many law reviews did you submit to? What service did you use? Scholastica? ExpressO? Just email?

The way this usually works is that you take your best offer and submit an expedite request to the journals that you have not heard back from that includes the details of the best offer. You will usually need to provide them with the name of the journal and the deadline that you have to inform that journal of your decision. How long did the journals give you? Some give longer, some give shorter, but always request a brief extension to let them know if the time period is particularly short (i.e., if they only gave you a week). Sometimes they just can't because of their production schedule. You might have trouble with the expedite requests at this point in the law review submission season as schools aren't back yet and depending on the journal, some will not expedite during certain months. Once you find out whether they'll give you a brief extension, submit your expedite request to journals that are better (don't bother sending the expedite request to the lower ranked journals). You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

Also, the ranking of the school the journal is associated with matters some - you do get better feedback and better editing at the better journals, but a general law review from a lower ranked school may be "better" (higher impact factor, higher readership, etc.) than a secondary journal from a higher ranked school. This can be especially true if the high ranked school has just started the journal you have an acceptance from. You should use the Washington and Lee Law Review Rankings to give you a sense of their relative rankings - http://lawlib.wlu.edu/LJ/index.aspx (limit to US and then click "combined score" and apply).


You. are. awesome. Thanks so much for this^

I thought I'd answer your questions and then just spit back a few of my own.
Submission Method: Scholatisca (I found nobody responds to ExpressO)
Submissions (Around 25, with a mix of general law reviews and specialty journals)
(happy to answer more questions if that would help)

A few questions:
1) When I send the expedites, should I include all (or say, top 3) of the journals I've been offered so it shows that my work is credible? Or is that viewed as a "rookie mistake"?
2) I totally agree with your sentiment about sending an expedite to the top journals right away, but at the same time I wanted to show those journals that my work has been "verified" (if you know what I mean) so that it merits consideration, as opposed to just being thrown into the reject pile immediately (I get it can be tedious to read through countless papers), and then update with say another expedite request if I get another acceptance to a higher journal- is this a bad move/bad thought process?
3) I took a look at the W&L rankings (thanks for that!) and I noticed that some lower ranked schools have disproportionately high rankings on that list. I'd like to publish more articles in the future, so do the rankings take precedence over the school? Like would Lewis & Clark Law Journal really be more impressive than say a law review from a T30 school? (T30 was arbitrary, but I had to pick a number)

Thanks!!

Jchance

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Re: Publication Question

Postby Jchance » Fri Aug 04, 2017 11:20 am

Anonymous User wrote:How many law reviews did you submit to? What service did you use? Scholastica? ExpressO? Just email?

The way this usually works is that you take your best offer and submit an expedite request to the journals that you have not heard back from that includes the details of the best offer. You will usually need to provide them with the name of the journal and the deadline that you have to inform that journal of your decision. How long did the journals give you? Some give longer, some give shorter, but always request a brief extension to let them know if the time period is particularly short (i.e., if they only gave you a week). Sometimes they just can't because of their production schedule. You might have trouble with the expedite requests at this point in the law review submission season as schools aren't back yet and depending on the journal, some will not expedite during certain months. Once you find out whether they'll give you a brief extension, submit your expedite request to journals that are better (don't bother sending the expedite request to the lower ranked journals). You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

Also, the ranking of the school the journal is associated with matters some - you do get better feedback and better editing at the better journals, but a general law review from a lower ranked school may be "better" (higher impact factor, higher readership, etc.) than a secondary journal from a higher ranked school. This can be especially true if the high ranked school has just started the journal you have an acceptance from. You should use the Washington and Lee Law Review Rankings to give you a sense of their relative rankings - http://lawlib.wlu.edu/LJ/index.aspx (limit to US and then click "combined score" and apply).


Fixed that false myth for you that even law profs commit.

Anonymous User wrote:A few questions:
1) When I send the expedites, should I include all (or say, top 3) of the journals I've been offered so it shows that my work is credible? Or is that viewed as a "rookie mistake"?
2) I totally agree with your sentiment about sending an expedite to the top journals right away, but at the same time I wanted to show those journals that my work has been "verified" (if you know what I mean) so that it merits consideration, as opposed to just being thrown into the reject pile immediately (I get it can be tedious to read through countless papers), and then update with say another expedite request if I get another acceptance to a higher journal- is this a bad move/bad thought process?
3) I took a look at the W&L rankings (thanks for that!) and I noticed that some lower ranked schools have disproportionately high rankings on that list. I'd like to publish more articles in the future, so do the rankings take precedence over the school? Like would Lewis & Clark Law Journal really be more impressive than say a law review from a T30 school? (T30 was arbitrary, but I had to pick a number)

Thanks!!


1) include all offers, starting with your best offer.
2) I'm not understanding your question.
3) use US News ranking over W&L journal ranking when picking journal. Unless it's a T50 flagship, always go with the T14 secondary over any lower ranked flagship journals. You'd regret publishing in lower-ranked flagship later.

Anonymous User
Posts: 327366
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Publication Question

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Aug 04, 2017 11:43 am

Jchance wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:How many law reviews did you submit to? What service did you use? Scholastica? ExpressO? Just email?

The way this usually works is that you take your best offer and submit an expedite request to the journals that you have not heard back from that includes the details of the best offer. You will usually need to provide them with the name of the journal and the deadline that you have to inform that journal of your decision. How long did the journals give you? Some give longer, some give shorter, but always request a brief extension to let them know if the time period is particularly short (i.e., if they only gave you a week). Sometimes they just can't because of their production schedule. You might have trouble with the expedite requests at this point in the law review submission season as schools aren't back yet and depending on the journal, some will not expedite during certain months. Once you find out whether they'll give you a brief extension, submit your expedite request to journals that are better (don't bother sending the expedite request to the lower ranked journals). You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

Also, the ranking of the school the journal is associated with matters some - you do get better feedback and better editing at the better journals, but a general law review from a lower ranked school may be "better" (higher impact factor, higher readership, etc.) than a secondary journal from a higher ranked school. This can be especially true if the high ranked school has just started the journal you have an acceptance from. You should use the Washington and Lee Law Review Rankings to give you a sense of their relative rankings - http://lawlib.wlu.edu/LJ/index.aspx (limit to US and then click "combined score" and apply).


Fixed that false myth for you that even law profs commit.

Anonymous User wrote:A few questions:
1) When I send the expedites, should I include all (or say, top 3) of the journals I've been offered so it shows that my work is credible? Or is that viewed as a "rookie mistake"?
2) I totally agree with your sentiment about sending an expedite to the top journals right away, but at the same time I wanted to show those journals that my work has been "verified" (if you know what I mean) so that it merits consideration, as opposed to just being thrown into the reject pile immediately (I get it can be tedious to read through countless papers), and then update with say another expedite request if I get another acceptance to a higher journal- is this a bad move/bad thought process?
3) I took a look at the W&L rankings (thanks for that!) and I noticed that some lower ranked schools have disproportionately high rankings on that list. I'd like to publish more articles in the future, so do the rankings take precedence over the school? Like would Lewis & Clark Law Journal really be more impressive than say a law review from a T30 school? (T30 was arbitrary, but I had to pick a number)

Thanks!!


1) include all offers, starting with your best offer.
2) I'm not understanding your question.
3) use US News ranking over W&L journal ranking when picking journal. Unless it's a T50 flagship, always go with the T14 secondary over any lower ranked flagship journals. You'd regret publishing in lower-ranked flagship later.



So even though Scholastica has the space set as "best offer" I should include all of them?

Regarding 2, I was responding to a prior poster who suggested that I hold off on sending an expedite request to a higher ranked (say T10) journal before I "climb the ladder", and only send expedite requests to journals ranked within those of my current offer. My question was, I had thought sending expedite requests to those T10's even with my current offers (and not waiting to "climb the ladder") would show those T10 journals that my article might merit consideration because others have already given me offers, and this way the T10 journal might at least consider it a bit more carefully than they would otherwise.

I was wondering if this would be a bad move and/or a bad line of reasoning.

Also, could you clarify what would constitute a T50 "flagship"?

Thanks for all the help!

Jchance

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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:17 am

Re: Publication Question

Postby Jchance » Fri Aug 04, 2017 11:52 am

Anonymous User wrote:You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

So even though Scholastica has the space set as "best offer" I should include all of them?

Regarding 2, I was responding to a prior poster who suggested that I hold off on sending an expedite request to a higher ranked (say T10) journal before I "climb the ladder", and only send expedite requests to journals ranked within those of my current offer. My question was, I had thought sending expedite requests to those T10's even with my current offers (and not waiting to "climb the ladder") would show those T10 journals that my article might merit consideration because others have already given me offers, and this way the T10 journal might at least consider it a bit more carefully than they would otherwise.

I was wondering if this would be a bad move and/or a bad line of reasoning.

Also, could you clarify what would constitute a T50 "flagship"?

Thanks for all the help!


Then I answered your question (2). See my correction of the false myth.

T50 flagships are the main/general law reviews of the top 50 law schools based on US News ranking.

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Posts: 327366
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Publication Question

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Aug 04, 2017 2:24 pm

Jchance wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

So even though Scholastica has the space set as "best offer" I should include all of them?

Regarding 2, I was responding to a prior poster who suggested that I hold off on sending an expedite request to a higher ranked (say T10) journal before I "climb the ladder", and only send expedite requests to journals ranked within those of my current offer. My question was, I had thought sending expedite requests to those T10's even with my current offers (and not waiting to "climb the ladder") would show those T10 journals that my article might merit consideration because others have already given me offers, and this way the T10 journal might at least consider it a bit more carefully than they would otherwise.

I was wondering if this would be a bad move and/or a bad line of reasoning.

Also, could you clarify what would constitute a T50 "flagship"?

Thanks for all the help!


Then I answered your question (2). See my correction of the false myth.

T50 flagships are the main/general law reviews of the top 50 law schools based on US News ranking.



The above is sometimes true sometimes not.

First, in my experience publishing in different law journals, Yale isn't going to care that you have an acceptance from Marquette, but they will likely care if the journal and school rank is closer. If you're an unknown quantity (i.e. not a law professor with a recognizable name) then the signal that someone closer to them in rank and quality is more valuable. At least with the experiences I've had, the advice to climb the ladder has served me better than sending something to a high ranked law journal that say...some third tier school has accepted your article. You can send the expedite requests and it may get a look faster, but when I have done this it's simply led to a quick rejection or a denial of my expedite request. When I've gone to the journals with something better it's turned out better. It's just anecdata, so YMMV and take it for what it's worth.

Second, the advice to stick with T14 secondary over a lower ranked flagship journal is sometimes ok sometimes not. With long established journals in significant fields there may be some association between the quality of the school and the readership/rank/impact of the journal. With some journals that association isn't going to exist, either because of age or some other unknown. The impact factor would suggest that UVA's JOLT has far lower citations than say Brooklyn Law Review. Sure, UVA is obviously a better school and you'll probably get better suggestions on things to clarify change etc., but if you're interested in impact of your scholarship it's probably better to go with Brooklyn Law Review than UVA JOLT.

It should also be noted that my advice is based on what works for academia and the way things are evaluated in academic circles. If you're a practicing lawyer, then simply having UVA JOLT on your resume may be better than having Brooklyn Law Review. That I cannot make an educated statement about.

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Publication Question

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Aug 04, 2017 4:52 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Jchance wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:You start with journals that are slightly better and try to get another acceptance and then continue working your way up. So, don't send a request to Harvard Law Review based on the T100. Send expedite requests to ones that are ranked slightly higher and then try to get an acceptance. If you get an acceptance then go slightly higher again. It's like a ladder you're climbing.

So even though Scholastica has the space set as "best offer" I should include all of them?

Regarding 2, I was responding to a prior poster who suggested that I hold off on sending an expedite request to a higher ranked (say T10) journal before I "climb the ladder", and only send expedite requests to journals ranked within those of my current offer. My question was, I had thought sending expedite requests to those T10's even with my current offers (and not waiting to "climb the ladder") would show those T10 journals that my article might merit consideration because others have already given me offers, and this way the T10 journal might at least consider it a bit more carefully than they would otherwise.

I was wondering if this would be a bad move and/or a bad line of reasoning.

Also, could you clarify what would constitute a T50 "flagship"?

Thanks for all the help!


Then I answered your question (2). See my correction of the false myth.

T50 flagships are the main/general law reviews of the top 50 law schools based on US News ranking.



The above is sometimes true sometimes not.

First, in my experience publishing in different law journals, Yale isn't going to care that you have an acceptance from Marquette, but they will likely care if the journal and school rank is closer. If you're an unknown quantity (i.e. not a law professor with a recognizable name) then the signal that someone closer to them in rank and quality is more valuable. At least with the experiences I've had, the advice to climb the ladder has served me better than sending something to a high ranked law journal that say...some third tier school has accepted your article. You can send the expedite requests and it may get a look faster, but when I have done this it's simply led to a quick rejection or a denial of my expedite request. When I've gone to the journals with something better it's turned out better. It's just anecdata, so YMMV and take it for what it's worth.

Second, the advice to stick with T14 secondary over a lower ranked flagship journal is sometimes ok sometimes not. With long established journals in significant fields there may be some association between the quality of the school and the readership/rank/impact of the journal. With some journals that association isn't going to exist, either because of age or some other unknown. The impact factor would suggest that UVA's JOLT has far lower citations than say Brooklyn Law Review. Sure, UVA is obviously a better school and you'll probably get better suggestions on things to clarify change etc., but if you're interested in impact of your scholarship it's probably better to go with Brooklyn Law Review than UVA JOLT.

It should also be noted that my advice is based on what works for academia and the way things are evaluated in academic circles. If you're a practicing lawyer, then simply having UVA JOLT on your resume may be better than having Brooklyn Law Review. That I cannot make an educated statement about.


Thanks for all this!!

In your experience, has it made a difference if you tell the journal you'll immediately accept if offered? Or it doesn't really make a difference? Is there anything else you can do to help your chances?



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