NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

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Art Prior

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Art Prior » Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:03 pm

Look at careers that are super easy, fun, pay well, and barley any work. Actors for example use drugs way more than lawyers and they have the cushiest lives ever, models also. Rich housewives love thier Xanax and wine just as much as lawyers. Broke ppl that don't work and live off government aid use a lot in certain areas.

The common denominator is that humans are biologically wired to love drugs the same way they desire sex and food. Everybody that is willing to cross that line ,no matter thier job or situation, will find a reason to do drugs. Those in biglaw use being overworked as the reason. Rich actors use boredom as thier excuse when they have months off between movies.

jarofsoup

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby jarofsoup » Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:12 pm

I do not think this was all about drug use. It was about the pressures of the profession and putting it before every other part of your life.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby cavalier1138 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:26 pm

Art Prior wrote:Look at careers that are super easy, fun, pay well, and barley any work. Actors for example use drugs way more than lawyers and they have the cushiest lives ever, models also. Rich housewives love thier Xanax and wine just as much as lawyers. Broke ppl that don't work and live off government aid use a lot in certain areas.

The common denominator is that humans are biologically wired to love drugs the same way they desire sex and food. Everybody that is willing to cross that line ,no matter thier job or situation, will find a reason to do drugs. Those in biglaw use being overworked as the reason. Rich actors use boredom as thier excuse when they have months off between movies.


See, now you're just invoking popular images from TV (or more accurately, reality shows).

And you're fundamentally wrong about the "wiring" argument. Everyone gets high off drugs. That doesn't mean that everyone will seek out drugs as soon as they feel like they can "cross the line", and it doesn't make everyone a potential addict. Some people are more prone to addiction than others, and some life situations make people more vulnerable.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:11 pm

Art Prior wrote:Look at careers that are super easy, fun, pay well, and barley any work. Actors for example use drugs way more than lawyers and they have the cushiest lives ever, models also. Rich housewives love thier Xanax and wine just as much as lawyers. Broke ppl that don't work and live off government aid use a lot in certain areas.

The common denominator is that humans are biologically wired to love drugs the same way they desire sex and food. Everybody that is willing to cross that line ,no matter thier job or situation, will find a reason to do drugs. Those in biglaw use being overworked as the reason. Rich actors use boredom as thier excuse when they have months off between movies.

Lol no. This is all silly.

Art Prior

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Art Prior » Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:59 pm

cavalier1138 wrote:
Art Prior wrote:Look at careers that are super easy, fun, pay well, and barley any work. Actors for example use drugs way more than lawyers and they have the cushiest lives ever, models also. Rich housewives love thier Xanax and wine just as much as lawyers. Broke ppl that don't work and live off government aid use a lot in certain areas.

The common denominator is that humans are biologically wired to love drugs the same way they desire sex and food. Everybody that is willing to cross that line ,no matter thier job or situation, will find a reason to do drugs. Those in biglaw use being overworked as the reason. Rich actors use boredom as thier excuse when they have months off between movies.


See, now you're just invoking popular images from TV (or more accurately, reality shows).

And you're fundamentally wrong about the "wiring" argument. Everyone gets high off drugs. That doesn't mean that everyone will seek out drugs as soon as they feel like they can "cross the line", and it doesn't make everyone a potential addict. Some people are more prone to addiction than others, and some life situations make people more vulnerable.


I disagree. The dopaminergic reward system is wired into every animal. I think it's the other way around....where life factors prevent ppl from using drugs...not cause them to. Its why people with cushy lives and stressful both turn to drugs.

Never heard of a mouse study where a few mice refused to self administer stimulants or opiates. Seems like some hardwiring to me. Humans just have cultural and social aspects that prevent them all from using drugs.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby jaekeem » Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:05 pm

Art Prior wrote:
cavalier1138 wrote:
Art Prior wrote:Look at careers that are super easy, fun, pay well, and barley any work. Actors for example use drugs way more than lawyers and they have the cushiest lives ever, models also. Rich housewives love thier Xanax and wine just as much as lawyers. Broke ppl that don't work and live off government aid use a lot in certain areas.

The common denominator is that humans are biologically wired to love drugs the same way they desire sex and food. Everybody that is willing to cross that line ,no matter thier job or situation, will find a reason to do drugs. Those in biglaw use being overworked as the reason. Rich actors use boredom as thier excuse when they have months off between movies.


See, now you're just invoking popular images from TV (or more accurately, reality shows).

And you're fundamentally wrong about the "wiring" argument. Everyone gets high off drugs. That doesn't mean that everyone will seek out drugs as soon as they feel like they can "cross the line", and it doesn't make everyone a potential addict. Some people are more prone to addiction than others, and some life situations make people more vulnerable.


I disagree. The dopaminergic reward system is wired into every animal. I think it's the other way around....where life factors prevent ppl from using drugs...not cause them to. Its why people with cushy lives and stressful both turn to drugs.

Never heard of a mouse study where a few mice refused to self administer stimulants or opiates. Seems like some hardwiring to me. Humans just have cultural and social aspects that prevent them all from using drugs.


Cultural and social aspects are all that separate man from mice when it comes to self-control? :lol:

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby cavalier1138 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:32 pm

Art Prior wrote:I disagree. The dopaminergic reward system is wired into every animal. I think it's the other way around....where life factors prevent ppl from using drugs...not cause them to. Its why people with cushy lives and stressful both turn to drugs.

Never heard of a mouse study where a few mice refused to self administer stimulants or opiates. Seems like some hardwiring to me. Humans just have cultural and social aspects that prevent them all from using drugs.


Well, they say you're never too old to learn new things...

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00426903

In a nutshell, the study showed that lab rats are more likely to do drugs when they are deprived of social connections and stimulating activity. This suggests that while drugs stimulate the pleasure centers of the brain, not everyone will become addicted. And your argument about people from different walks of life doing drugs doesn't hold water. People with "cushy" lives could be under extreme stress, or lonely, or battling mental illness, or any number of other things. The only hard and fast rule is that happy people generally don't feel compelled to take controlled substances.

But this is all far afield. The point is that addicts (yourself included) are best served by getting help, which does not include well-meaning but enabling family members.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby PeanutsNJam » Fri Jul 21, 2017 10:40 am

Art Prior wrote:I disagree. The dopaminergic reward system is wired into every animal. I think it's the other way around....where life factors prevent ppl from using drugs...not cause them to. Its why people with cushy lives and stressful both turn to drugs.

Never heard of a mouse study where a few mice refused to self administer stimulants or opiates. Seems like some hardwiring to me. Humans just have cultural and social aspects that prevent them all from using drugs.


The fear of blowing a disproportionate amount of money on temporary highs, developing a crippling dependency on a particular substance, and long-term permanent damage to my body are what stop me from doing drugs. Yeah, societal and cultural pressures have something to do with it, but they're a tertiary concern.

There's a reason why not everyone making over 100k is a drug addict, and it's not because of the puritanical specter of society.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jul 21, 2017 11:24 am

Anyone else in this thread susceptible to gambling? NYC biglaw and everyday when I have to work late I put around $500 in play on fanduel/draftkings. I find that the sweat helps keep me going and deal with the monotony. When I win i say to myself hah! You're not stupid like the tyrannical midlevel and asshole partner thinks you are. When I lose of course it had the opposite effect.

Art Prior

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Art Prior » Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:11 pm

cavalier1138 wrote:
Art Prior wrote:I disagree. The dopaminergic reward system is wired into every animal. I think it's the other way around....where life factors prevent ppl from using drugs...not cause them to. Its why people with cushy lives and stressful both turn to drugs.

Never heard of a mouse study where a few mice refused to self administer stimulants or opiates. Seems like some hardwiring to me. Humans just have cultural and social aspects that prevent them all from using drugs.


Well, they say you're never too old to learn new things...

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00426903

In a nutshell, the study showed that lab rats are more likely to do drugs when they are deprived of social connections and stimulating activity. This suggests that while drugs stimulate the pleasure centers of the brain, not everyone will become addicted. And your argument about people from different walks of life doing drugs doesn't hold water. People with "cushy" lives could be under extreme stress, or lonely, or battling mental illness, or any number of other things. The only hard and fast rule is that happy people generally don't feel compelled to take controlled substances.

But this is all far afield. The point is that addicts (yourself included) are best served by getting help, which does not include well-meaning but enabling family members.


I already discussed how there is no existing help for people in pain that require opiates to work due to chronic pain. Perhaps if doctors weren't so pressured by the DEA they could prescribe a dose equivalent to my intake and I wouldn't need help anymore BC i wouldn't be considered an abuser and felon.

Rats are social animals too so no new info presemted there, and just because creating ohysical or emotional pain for an animal makes them more likely to do drugs doesn't mean happy individuals aren't wired to love them because social things LESSEN use not create it. Lots of happy fulfilled people use drugs anyways (but biglaw slaves don't fall into that category)

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby UVA2B » Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:20 pm

Art Prior wrote:
cavalier1138 wrote:
Art Prior wrote:I disagree. The dopaminergic reward system is wired into every animal. I think it's the other way around....where life factors prevent ppl from using drugs...not cause them to. Its why people with cushy lives and stressful both turn to drugs.

Never heard of a mouse study where a few mice refused to self administer stimulants or opiates. Seems like some hardwiring to me. Humans just have cultural and social aspects that prevent them all from using drugs.


Well, they say you're never too old to learn new things...

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00426903

In a nutshell, the study showed that lab rats are more likely to do drugs when they are deprived of social connections and stimulating activity. This suggests that while drugs stimulate the pleasure centers of the brain, not everyone will become addicted. And your argument about people from different walks of life doing drugs doesn't hold water. People with "cushy" lives could be under extreme stress, or lonely, or battling mental illness, or any number of other things. The only hard and fast rule is that happy people generally don't feel compelled to take controlled substances.

But this is all far afield. The point is that addicts (yourself included) are best served by getting help, which does not include well-meaning but enabling family members.


I already discussed how there is no existing help for people in pain that require opiates to work due to chronic pain. Perhaps if doctors weren't so pressured by the DEA they could prescribe a dose equivalent to my intake and I wouldn't need help anymore BC i wouldn't be considered an abuser and felon.

And just because creating ohysical or emotional pain for an animal makes them more likely to do drugs doesn't mean happy individuals aren't wired to love them. Lots of happy fulfilled people use drugs anyways (but biglaw slaves don't fall into that category)


To dispel your miscategorization of your doctor's treatment plan: it's not the DEA they are worried about so much as it is a fear of overprescribing to the point where you overdose on a prescribed amount where they could legitimately lose their medical license (and more importantly, be the cause of their patient's death). Plus doctors are sensitive to the drug epidemic in this country and do not want to contribute to the growing problem of opioid addiction and overuse when they can reasonably try to prevent it.

Doctors aren't saying, "aww shucks, if it weren't for the DEA, I'd keep you sufficiently numb 24/7 because it's the right thing to do." Doctors swore a Hippocratic oath to do no harm, and that includes identifying when a person, even one who is dealing with chronic pain issues that the doctor has no way of separating the underlying condition and the resulting dependence on the drug, is becoming too reliant on a drug. They're called frequent fliers in ERs, and doctors see them coming because it's very clear as seasoned professionals when someone is crossing the gap between "chronic pain" and "drug over-reliance." Pain is one of the most difficult things for a physician to deal with because it can be real or imagined with literally the same outward manifestation. The only thing the doctor truly has to go on coming from a heavy user such as yourself is your word that you continue to experience pain. When they juxtapose what you're telling them as the patient and what they're seeing in your treatment history, they do their best to figure out a treatment plan that will help you with your pain while not growing your reliance on opioids. It's an extremely fine line to walk, and more often doctors will proceed with caution in prescribing those narcotics because their medical license is on the line.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jul 21, 2017 3:02 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Anyone else in this thread susceptible to gambling? NYC biglaw and everyday when I have to work late I put around $500 in play on fanduel/draftkings. I find that the sweat helps keep me going and deal with the monotony. When I win i say to myself hah! You're not stupid like the tyrannical midlevel and asshole partner thinks you are. When I lose of course it had the opposite effect.


Yep, though not just during work hours. Last football season I'd throw $500 on the 1pm games, then would chase losses all the way through the primetime tourneys which imo are a complete crapshoot. This transformed into betting on/playing draftkings NHL/NBA every night, then baseball when summer rolled around, then random bursts of online blackjack. I basically wrecked my bank account and felt like complete shit after big losing sessions. I have no idea what I was thinking. These sessions have become more rare since I've recognized that it was becoming a huge problem (not just financially) but I still slip up every once in a while.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jul 21, 2017 3:36 pm

I feel like shopping is a similar thing. I'm not in biglaw (I'd never hack it) but some stresses are inherent to law and I definitely online shop to make myself feel better. So far it's not wrecking my account because I stick to little things but I still spend plenty on shit I don't need.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:26 pm

Does this mean someone with anxiety/depression and substance abuse issues should avoid a law school/ Biglaw path?

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby PeanutsNJam » Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:31 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Does this mean someone with anxiety/depression and substance abuse issues should avoid a law school/ Biglaw path?


I'd say definitely yes to biglaw. I've seen how law school can make someone with anxiety/depression/substance abuse issues absolutely miserable, but it's possible that there are lawyer jobs that are okay for them (mostly public interest work). Lower stress, fewer hours, doing meaningful work, etc.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby glitched » Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:37 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Anyone else in this thread susceptible to gambling? NYC biglaw and everyday when I have to work late I put around $500 in play on fanduel/draftkings. I find that the sweat helps keep me going and deal with the monotony. When I win i say to myself hah! You're not stupid like the tyrannical midlevel and asshole partner thinks you are. When I lose of course it had the opposite effect.


My wife (also a biglaw lawyer) and I go to AC almost every month to get that sweet craps high. I consider it an adult arcade - i.e., I don't go to win, but to play. We're also not spending baller money. That's pretty much how I justify to myself that it's okay. I also dabble in draftkings, but I can't really compete with the pros so never got addicted to it. I can see it getting dangerous though - usually a big loss will set me straight. You're doing $500 per week (assuming its Football)? That seems like a lot.
Last edited by glitched on Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby lolwat » Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:42 pm

PeanutsNJam wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Does this mean someone with anxiety/depression and substance abuse issues should avoid a law school/ Biglaw path?


I'd say definitely yes to biglaw. I've seen how law school can make someone with anxiety/depression/substance abuse issues absolutely miserable, but it's possible that there are lawyer jobs that are okay for them (mostly public interest work). Lower stress, fewer hours, doing meaningful work, etc.


Doing meaningful work can be a double edged sword for some people by the way, depending what is defined as meaningful work. If you go in trying to really help people, you will sometimes see bad things happen to decent people and you lose the case or there's nothing you can do about it.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby elendinel » Fri Jul 21, 2017 10:01 pm

Art Prior wrote:Look at careers that are super easy, fun, pay well, and barley any work. Actors for example use drugs way more than lawyers and they have the cushiest lives ever, models also.


:lol:

PeanutsNJam wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Does this mean someone with anxiety/depression and substance abuse issues should avoid a law school/ Biglaw path?


I'd say definitely yes to biglaw. I've seen how law school can make someone with anxiety/depression/substance abuse issues absolutely miserable, but it's possible that there are lawyer jobs that are okay for them (mostly public interest work). Lower stress, fewer hours, doing meaningful work, etc.


I wouldn't necessarily call public interest low stress; it's just different stress. Instead of spending 15 hours a day working on random documents while partners scream at you, you may spend 9 hours a day having indigent clients who were unfairly booted from their homes screaming at you because they're scared and stressed out and there's not a whole lot anyone (including you) can really do to help them in the short term. You may spend 8 hours a day having children cry during your interviews because their parents are fighting/one or more of their parents abandoned them. Etc. PI gets a lot more personal, which creates a host of issues that you don't deal with when you're in biglaw. For some it's still a better environment for them than biglaw was, but for others it'll be just as stressful.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby hdunlop » Sat Jul 22, 2017 2:45 am

Bless you Art you're in denial

I love to gamble and gotta stay away from online. Would be a disaster.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby cavalier1138 » Sat Jul 22, 2017 6:41 am

PeanutsNJam wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Does this mean someone with anxiety/depression and substance abuse issues should avoid a law school/ Biglaw path?


I'd say definitely yes to biglaw. I've seen how law school can make someone with anxiety/depression/substance abuse issues absolutely miserable, but it's possible that there are lawyer jobs that are okay for them (mostly public interest work). Lower stress, fewer hours, doing meaningful work, etc.


I wouldn't necessarily call public interest low stress; it's just different stress. Instead of spending 15 hours a day working on random documents while partners scream at you, you may spend 9 hours a day having indigent clients who were unfairly booted from their homes screaming at you because they're scared and stressed out and there's not a whole lot anyone (including you) can really do to help them in the short term. You may spend 8 hours a day having children cry during your interviews because their parents are fighting/one or more of their parents abandoned them. Etc. PI gets a lot more personal, which creates a host of issues that you don't deal with when you're in biglaw. For some it's still a better environment for them than biglaw was, but for others it'll be just as stressful.[/quote]

Yeah, I was gonna say...

Some PI work is less stressful, just like some private practice work is less stressful. But death penalty attorneys are routinely fighting for their client's lives, PDs get overloaded with cases, family law attorneys have to deal with custody battles, prosecutors and PDs get death threats, immigration attorneys watch families get torn apart, human rights attorneys have clients being secretly detained and tortured, and the list keeps going. I'd say that someone looking for a low-stress legal job could try tax, but I'm sure some tax attorneys would have their own stories of the pressure they face.

Short version: if you don't want a stressful career, the law may not be the best path.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:44 am

bk1 wrote:
dixiecupdrinking wrote:
Pokemon wrote:Biglaw is stessful but come on, this offensive to people who actually have dangerous careers.

No it's not "offensive" to anyone. Come on.

I sympathize with pokemon here b/c my gut reaction is often to dismiss mental illness/issues as people being "weak" (I don't mean this flippantly to pokemon). That said, the correct response is that mental illness/issues are just as serious as physical ones even though our society doesn't treat them as such. I feel that gut reaction now, even though I mentally know it's not right.


Those gender roles get ingrained deep.

Anonymous User wrote:I feel like shopping is a similar thing. I'm not in biglaw (I'd never hack it) but some stresses are inherent to law and I definitely online shop to make myself feel better. So far it's not wrecking my account because I stick to little things but I still spend plenty on shit I don't need.


Yeah I've done this a lot. I have to move in August and I have so much...stuff. I don't even remember where half of it came from/why I bought it.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Jul 22, 2017 1:01 pm

Yep, though not just during work hours. Last football season I'd throw $500 on the 1pm games, then would chase losses all the way through the primetime tourneys which imo are a complete crapshoot. This transformed into betting on/playing draftkings NHL/NBA every night, then baseball when summer rolled around, then random bursts of online blackjack. I basically wrecked my bank account and felt like complete shit after big losing sessions. I have no idea what I was thinking. These sessions have become more rare since I've recognized that it was becoming a huge problem (not just financially) but I still slip up every once in a while.


My wife (also a biglaw lawyer) and I go to AC almost every month to get that sweet craps high. I consider it an adult arcade - i.e., I don't go to win, but to play. We're also not spending baller money. That's pretty much how I justify to myself that it's okay. I also dabble in draftkings, but I can't really compete with the pros so never got addicted to it. I can see it getting dangerous though - usually a big loss will set me straight. You're doing $500 per week (assuming its Football)? That seems like a lot.



I'm the first anon who posted about gambling. I'm in every day mode on draftkings MLB right now which is slowly turning into a disaster. My mindset whenever I run into a horrible 70-80 hour billable week like I am now is I'm gonna spike 1st place, quit biglaw and become a pro LOL only to shoot myself in the foot financially and extend the amount of time I need to stay in biglaw rather than saving and developing an actual plan for an exit like a reasonable adult. The sad thing is when I was in college I actually had the head for poker and stats etc. but being a lawyer has legit made me dumber in that regard and has taken all my time so I have no chance of competing with the pros and should just accept that and either play small/for fun or quit entirely. Probably going to need to end up quitting entirely. It's incredibly dangerous that it's on my phone and I can literally punch in my lineups with one hand and review/mark-up documents with my other hand with my office door closed with no physical effects to me or anyone in my life knowing any different.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby sanzgo » Sat Jul 22, 2017 1:53 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Yep, though not just during work hours. Last football season I'd throw $500 on the 1pm games, then would chase losses all the way through the primetime tourneys which imo are a complete crapshoot. This transformed into betting on/playing draftkings NHL/NBA every night, then baseball when summer rolled around, then random bursts of online blackjack. I basically wrecked my bank account and felt like complete shit after big losing sessions. I have no idea what I was thinking. These sessions have become more rare since I've recognized that it was becoming a huge problem (not just financially) but I still slip up every once in a while.


My wife (also a biglaw lawyer) and I go to AC almost every month to get that sweet craps high. I consider it an adult arcade - i.e., I don't go to win, but to play. We're also not spending baller money. That's pretty much how I justify to myself that it's okay. I also dabble in draftkings, but I can't really compete with the pros so never got addicted to it. I can see it getting dangerous though - usually a big loss will set me straight. You're doing $500 per week (assuming its Football)? That seems like a lot.



I'm the first anon who posted about gambling. I'm in every day mode on draftkings MLB right now which is slowly turning into a disaster. My mindset whenever I run into a horrible 70-80 hour billable week like I am now is I'm gonna spike 1st place, quit biglaw and become a pro LOL only to shoot myself in the foot financially and extend the amount of time I need to stay in biglaw rather than saving and developing an actual plan for an exit like a reasonable adult. The sad thing is when I was in college I actually had the head for poker and stats etc. but being a lawyer has legit made me dumber in that regard and has taken all my time so I have no chance of competing with the pros and should just accept that and either play small/for fun or quit entirely. Probably going to need to end up quitting entirely. It's incredibly dangerous that it's on my phone and I can literally punch in my lineups with one hand and review/mark-up documents with my other hand with my office door closed with no physical effects to me or anyone in my life knowing any different.



jeezus christ dude if you're gonna throw money away, why not gamble it away on otm options during earnings season. if you're lucky, you could quit biglaw earlier than expected. if you're not so lucky, hell that'd have been money you would have thrown away anyway. if you can't trade due to biglaw firm restrictions, just go YOLO on cryptocurrencies and hodl. you actually have a good chance of tripling, quadrupling your money in the long run.

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby lawlorbust » Sat Jul 22, 2017 2:19 pm

sanzgo wrote:jeezus christ dude if you're gonna throw money away, why not gamble it away on otm options during earnings season. if you're lucky, you could quit biglaw earlier than expected. if you're not so lucky, hell that'd have been money you would have thrown away anyway. if you can't trade due to biglaw firm restrictions, just go YOLO on cryptocurrencies and hodl. you actually have a good chance of tripling, quadrupling your money in the long run.


This is a great idea. "And if you hit the jackpot on those out-of-money options, and the SEC throws you into the clink, you'll never have to work biglaw again!"

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Re: NY Times Article-The Lawyer, the Addict

Postby bk1 » Sun Jul 23, 2017 3:40 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Those gender roles get ingrained deep.

Undeniably.



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