Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
Jchance

Silver
Posts: 722
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:17 am

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby Jchance » Sat Jun 03, 2017 4:07 pm

I find these options are rather drastic: either biglaw or financial sector or back to community college... OP and others who seriously contemplate quitting law, you should really read Tony Kronman's "Living in the Law" (UChiLRev) and "Education's End" (book), you would likely find where in law you might fit in before quitting it altogether.

RufusShinra

New
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 3:45 am

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby RufusShinra » Sat Jun 03, 2017 4:07 pm

I'm curious and apologies if slightly off topic, but did many of you who left biglaw or are contemplating leaving have like a "honeymoon" phase initially where you "enjoyed" it and then just over time got more and more tired of it or did you know you disliked it from the onset?

Anonymous User
Posts: 325129
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Jun 03, 2017 6:14 pm

RufusShinra wrote:I'm curious and apologies if slightly off topic, but did many of you who left biglaw or are contemplating leaving have like a "honeymoon" phase initially where you "enjoyed" it and then just over time got more and more tired of it or did you know you disliked it from the onset?


I'm the anon that wants to leave after a year. I really enjoyed it for the first three months and hoped to stick around for a while. Then I got staffed on the deal for the psychopath partner and senior associate and it burned me out quick. I billed around 300 hours in a month for absolute pieces of shit. Since then everyone seems like a little eichmann.

User avatar
elendinel

Silver
Posts: 975
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 12:29 pm

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby elendinel » Sun Jun 04, 2017 1:11 pm

Jchance wrote:I find these options are rather drastic: either biglaw or financial sector or back to community college... OP and others who seriously contemplate quitting law, you should really read Tony Kronman's "Living in the Law" (UChiLRev) and "Education's End" (book), you would likely find where in law you might fit in before quitting it altogether.


IME this is common with people who didn't think deeply about why they wanted to go into law at the outset and delay that until they start in biglaw and confirm for themselves that the law is definitely not for them. I.e., the people who think they can do any job so long as it pays a lot, and choose biglaw because it seems the easiest from the outside. They often seek drastic-looking options after either because (1) they just skip to the next possible career that may bring a lot of money, or (2) they finally think about what they want, and realize it's not something they could have possibly gotten out of the law (or the other options).

I don't know how much effort OP put into Take 2 of his/her career, but it's very possible that once OP actually thought about what (s)he truly wanted, (s)he realized it was something a legal career can't give him/her. Another reminder to never spend hundreds of dollars for an education for a particular career unless you've thought a lot about it and about what you're going to do if you don't like it.

Jchance

Silver
Posts: 722
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:17 am

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby Jchance » Sun Jun 04, 2017 2:09 pm

^
I think in conjunction with sunk cost--which I think is a legit consideration to think about, one should also think about leveraging or salvaging what one currently has. For example, after buying and driving a Ferrari, one realizes s/he does not like it. A sensible person would not simply abandon the car, but rather, sells it or do something similar to recoup the investment.

User avatar
elendinel

Silver
Posts: 975
Joined: Fri Jan 03, 2014 12:29 pm

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby elendinel » Sun Jun 04, 2017 9:25 pm

Jchance wrote:^
I think in conjunction with sunk cost--which I think is a legit consideration to think about, one should also think about leveraging or salvaging what one currently has. For example, after buying and driving a Ferrari, one realizes s/he does not like it. A sensible person would not simply abandon the car, but rather, sells it or do something similar to recoup the investment.


The thing about a law degree is that you can't sell it, though; the only way to "recoup" the investment, by your argument, would be to stay in law/doing something legal. Which makes sense for the law student who did go to law school wanting to do law, but hates the job they have currently, but does not make much sense for the law student who knew from day one that law wasn't their thing, but kept up with it because $$/because they didn't want to figure out what they really ought to do.

I think someone in OP's position should always think about why they hate [job], and think carefully about whether the issue is their supervisor, their practice group in their office, their office as a whole, their work environment (corporation, law firm, government, non-profit, whatever), or the field in general, etc. And I do agree that people who didn't do their due diligence on what a legal career can/can't be, should definitely be doing this once they realize they hate biglaw and need a new path to take. I don't see a value in focusing too much on time already invested in something you hate, though. Sometimes the best way to salvage what one has is to get out of it before your situation gets worse from years of trying to make something work that's just not going to work.

Anonymous User
Posts: 325129
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Jun 05, 2017 11:54 am

elendinel wrote:
Jchance wrote:I find these options are rather drastic: either biglaw or financial sector or back to community college... OP and others who seriously contemplate quitting law, you should really read Tony Kronman's "Living in the Law" (UChiLRev) and "Education's End" (book), you would likely find where in law you might fit in before quitting it altogether.


IME this is common with people who didn't think deeply about why they wanted to go into law at the outset and delay that until they start in biglaw and confirm for themselves that the law is definitely not for them. I.e., the people who think they can do any job so long as it pays a lot, and choose biglaw because it seems the easiest from the outside. They often seek drastic-looking options after either because (1) they just skip to the next possible career that may bring a lot of money, or (2) they finally think about what they want, and realize it's not something they could have possibly gotten out of the law (or the other options).

I don't know how much effort OP put into Take 2 of his/her career, but it's very possible that once OP actually thought about what (s)he truly wanted, (s)he realized it was something a legal career can't give him/her. Another reminder to never spend hundreds of dollars for an education for a particular career unless you've thought a lot about it and about what you're going to do if you don't like it.


This is pretty much right. The reason my decisions seem drastic is because I never gave too much thought as to what I actually wanted to do in my career and just got on the conveyor belt. I was 21 when I graduated college and never really used college to figure out my passions, but I was pretty close to building on my science minor and going that direction when I got suckered into thinking money = happiness and [prestige makes me smart. I went to law school because I did well on the LSAT and there was a clearly defined path from top law schools (which I liked more than the fuzzy path of going to grad school in the sciences). I hated law school, but was told the practice of law would be better. I hated legal research, but liked my corporate law classes, so thought maybe that would be my thing. I got my dream job doing corporate work at a top NYC firm (WSJ deals, huge deal values, top attorneys in their field) and was absolutely miserable within 6 months and have remained pretty miserable since then. Always being on call, deadlines, the stress, the feeling that what you are doing is completely meaningless, difficult personalities (with seemingly no perspective on life at all) has really gotten to me and there are few professional fields that don't come with these challenges, especially in NYC, outside of a few government jobs.

Ultimately, I just want to be happy with what I'm doing and not work to death. It's not even hard work that gets me, I worked 40+ hours a week during law school and worked 70+ hours a week at two jobs in college during the summer, I used to love working and making money. It's just not fun waking up every day questioning wtf the point of getting out of bed is, or trying to see if you can just not go in to work because you want to sit around and get stoned and watch netflix instead of being around your office. I'm 28 years old and I feel like i'm regressing in terms of professional development, management ability, and just being a likable, fun person. It's a really shitty feeling to think that the time to experiment with your career was 10 years ago, and now i'm stuck with massive debt and a career path that is slowly making me apathetic about life and has made me regret many of my choices. I just don't want to be bound to that state of thinking, and while thinking of sunk costs is good when planning on investments, or whether to call a raise in poker, when talking about your career, something that will define you for the next 30 years, I think it is really important to be happy with your choices and feel good about what you do, regardless of the price you have already paid.

Jchance

Silver
Posts: 722
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 2:17 am

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby Jchance » Mon Jun 05, 2017 12:45 pm

^I agree with what others have said in response to my posts. I'll simply close with this thought: The grass is always greener on the other side in your mind, but the reality could very well be vastly different. Imagine starting off at a community college then 4-5 years later, working on your next high-paying career and thinking the same thought of the greener grass again. So you better think hard and make sure your next decision is a much better one.

dixiecupdrinking

Gold
Posts: 3440
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2008 2:39 pm

Re: Anyone Ever Just Say "F*** It" To Biglaw?

Postby dixiecupdrinking » Mon Jun 05, 2017 1:21 pm

Jchance wrote:^I agree with what others have said in response to my posts. I'll simply close with this thought: The grass is always greener on the other side in your mind, but the reality could very well be vastly different. Imagine starting off at a community college then 4-5 years later, working on your next high-paying career and thinking the same thought of the greener grass again. So you better think hard and make sure your next decision is a much better one.

The whole problem is its effectively impossible to know ahead of time if your next decision is going to be better. That's a terrible reason to continue doing something that you are certain you hate.

I agree with the caution against throwing out the baby with the bathwater. Maybe there are things people can do in the law that they'd like even if they don't like their current jobs. But I think "don't make a change until you're sure it's correct" is a great way to make yourself miserable.



Return to “Legal Employment�

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.