Regretting consulting after law school?

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 05, 2017 12:18 pm

Consulting is mind numbingly boring sometimes. I am leaving consulting for law and never looking back. I can't deny the money is great, but the travel combined with the long hours just isn't worth it for me.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 05, 2017 12:21 pm

smile0751 wrote:Did you take the bar before starting in consulting?

MBB anon from above here. I did. Didn't really see a reason not to, though I don't anticipate ever practicing law. It's just one of those things where I felt like I wouldn't *really* be able to claim I'm a real JD unless I took and passed the bar. At least at my firm most JDs have taken the bar, though of course it has no "impact" on your career.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 05, 2017 12:28 pm

corporatemandaorbust wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Hello,

MBB consultant here who joined last year. I did a previous thread on life as a consultant you should search for (about 3 months back), and there are others I believe.

I don't regret it at all, and am much happier generally than my law firm peers from law school. That's not to say it's all flowers and sunshine, but generally the work has been (at a high level) strategic and high-level, I've learned a good amount, I haven't had any weekend work (though hours during the week can be tough), and the people I work with are truly amazing. I'm also generally happy about the types of exit opportunities that will start opening up to me in the next year, having observed people who have left my firm.

Here's what I'd say: there is NO overlap between the work you will do as a corporate associate and as a consultant. None. They are completely different things, and I encourage you to look at them that way. The reason I say this is because you're at a point where you finally really need to decide what you want for yourself, and no one can answer that for you. Money shouldn't be the main factor here (and it's a non-factor, as after all-in comp is weighed both fields are within ~10% of each other for first-years). I would also not encourage the 2 years in BigLaw and then maybe do consulting mentality. There's no carryover or credit for being a lawyer in consulting, and you'd have to start all over essentially. This is not the worst thing by a long shot, and my first manager who is a rockstar was actually in this exact boat, it's just to say that it's not ideal.

Happy to answer any further questions you or others have.


Interesting. So would you say most people would prefer strategy consulting to law? Or is it a certain trade-off?


Well, like I said they're just very different. I picked MBB (after doing a couple of different corporate summer associate law firm roles) so it definitely was my preference. As another poster mentioned, the only real downsides I can see are travel and leaving the law, and there are a lot of upsides (more interesting exit ops, cool projects, limited or no weekend work, etc.) If one gets over the mental block of "leaving the law", I also can't see why someone would prefer being a corporate associate, but hey that's why I'm a consultant. I'm sure others differ and that's perfectly fine. I do think however if you talk to corporate associates, and MBB associates, the MBB associates have a much lower dissatisfaction %. This is at least the impression I get from speaking with the associates and managers I work with at MBB, and then speaking with the law firm associates I know.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby sparty99 » Wed Apr 05, 2017 1:31 pm

corporatemandaorbust wrote:
sparty99 wrote:Consulting is overrated, I did it pre-law, but I think you would probably have a better life as a consultant versus a lawyer. You will actually get to take vacation. If you are talking about MBB, clearly they are the best and after 2 to 3 years you can easily go get a corpoate strategy role at a Fortune 500 company if you burn out as a consultant.

If you do law, your skills won't transfer. Only law people will want to hire you.


What do you mean it is overrated? The skill-set gained at MBB isn't as versatile as people think?


People think you are always working on cool projects and traveling to awesome locations, but you could be in Omaha, Nebraska Monday through Thursday. The travel does get tiresome. Fast.

Also, the work is not always interesting. You spend all day staring at Microsoft Excel doing data analysis, financial modeling, etc. PowerPoint is also your friend. You will, however, eat at great restaraunts and earn frequent flyer mileages for awesome vacations.

I don't think the skills you learn are as versatile as they might claim. However, I've seen people go from consulting to marketing, consulting to banking, consulting to corporate strategy. It really just depends. You will have more career options if you do MBB then Corporate Law. I did corporate law for and found the work to be similar to consulting in the sense that you really aren't practicing law, but just doing mind numbing and boring tasks. I left corporate law after a year so I can be a litigator, which I enjoy much more.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 05, 2017 6:55 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I can't deny the money is great, but the travel combined with the long hours just isn't worth it for me.


What's MBB comp like 4 to 6 years out? the gap may seem small now ($150k v $180k), but I suspect it will get much bigger, fast.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby FascinatedWanderer » Wed Apr 05, 2017 7:03 pm

It's merit based not lockstep. In 4-6 years you'd be making 300k+ if you're doing well, maybe 200-210 if you're not.

Keep in mind also the substantial 401k contribution and the fact that the health plans aren't nearly as shitty as the ones law firms offer and the expense policies are much more liberal.

Of course you'd probably be "counseled out" if you're not doing well.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby mvp99 » Wed Apr 05, 2017 7:35 pm

FascinatedWanderer wrote:It's merit based not lockstep. In 4-6 years you'd be making 300k+ if you're doing well, maybe 200-210 if you're not.

Keep in mind also the substantial 401k contribution and the fact that the health plans aren't nearly as shitty as the ones law firms offer and the expense policies are much more liberal.

Of course you'd probably be "counseled out" if you're not doing well.


How do you "dont do well"in consulting

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby sparty99 » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:02 pm

mvp99 wrote:
FascinatedWanderer wrote:It's merit based not lockstep. In 4-6 years you'd be making 300k+ if you're doing well, maybe 200-210 if you're not.

Keep in mind also the substantial 401k contribution and the fact that the health plans aren't nearly as shitty as the ones law firms offer and the expense policies are much more liberal.

Of course you'd probably be "counseled out" if you're not doing well.


How do you "dont do well"in consulting


Why don't you ask the people who get out counseled.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:18 pm

FascinatedWanderer wrote:It's merit based not lockstep. In 4-6 years you'd be making 300k+ if you're doing well, maybe 200-210 if you're not.

Keep in mind also the substantial 401k contribution and the fact that the health plans aren't nearly as shitty as the ones law firms offer and the expense policies are much more liberal.

Of course you'd probably be "counseled out" if you're not doing well.


At my MBB, 4-6 years out (after two promotions) is a base of $225k with a bonus that is in the 50-100% of your base for top performers.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:22 pm

sparty99 wrote:
mvp99 wrote:
FascinatedWanderer wrote:It's merit based not lockstep. In 4-6 years you'd be making 300k+ if you're doing well, maybe 200-210 if you're not.

Keep in mind also the substantial 401k contribution and the fact that the health plans aren't nearly as shitty as the ones law firms offer and the expense policies are much more liberal.

Of course you'd probably be "counseled out" if you're not doing well.


How do you "dont do well"in consulting


Why don't you ask the people who get out counseled.

MBB anon here.

~200 (give or take depending on bonus) is first year all in comp, you're not making that in 4-6 years you make around that the first couple of years. By 4-6 years you'll be around the pre-partner level, and all MBB has a ~6 year partner trick give or take a year. Not many people stick around for years 4-6 unless they feel they have a chance of making partner, and salaries (all in) are higher than 300k (including "not well" performers), but there is a reasonably wide dispersion as sparty mentioned based on performance.

MBB is famous across all industries as having an "up or out" culture. You can't fly under the radar and stick around, either you are tracking and progressing or you're asked to leave. This can happen for a lot of reasons as they continually expect you to grow and expand your responsibilities/knowledge. It is far, far easier to fly under the radar at a V100 firm and not get fired for a lot longer.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Apr 06, 2017 1:27 pm

OP here.

Thank you all for your thoughtful responses.

I think I will take the MBB offer. My thoughts are: (1) The work that a MBB consultant seems much more interesting than that of a corporate associate with exit opps more along the lines of what I want to do (e.g., executive at a company instead of being the company's GC). (2) The work-life balance suits me better. I don't mind working hard during the week as long as I can expect the weekends to be protected (barring fire drills or emergencies). I'm not enthused by the prospect of expecting to work on Saturdays. (3) It seems like there is a much higher upside financially as a consultant when taking into consideration the exit opps and my inclination not to be a partner at a law firm.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:44 pm

Anonymous User wrote:OP here.

Thank you all for your thoughtful responses.

I think I will take the MBB offer. My thoughts are: (1) The work that a MBB consultant seems much more interesting than that of a corporate associate with exit opps more along the lines of what I want to do (e.g., executive at a company instead of being the company's GC). (2) The work-life balance suits me better. I don't mind working hard during the week as long as I can expect the weekends to be protected (barring fire drills or emergencies). I'm not enthused by the prospect of expecting to work on Saturdays. (3) It seems like there is a much higher upside financially as a consultant when taking into consideration the exit opps and my inclination not to be a partner at a law firm.


MBB anon here. Congrats! Happy to exchange more info if you want to create a throwaway I can e-mail you at.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby jkpolk » Thu Apr 06, 2017 5:26 pm

I think law students don't fully appreciate that corporate lawyers never, ever call the shots. The client always decides what to do. You keep track of the issues, present them in an ordered way, write up the documents - but you're not a "trusted advisor." You're a scribe who suggests the font and, if the client disagrees with your font suggestion (which is frequent), you defer to the client's judgement.

Most people who go to law school are unequipped to make real decisions - they are happy to sit in a dark room, with a fridge full of mountain dew or diet dr pepper, moving around commas while politely managing someone else's deal (until they just can't anymore). That's what you'll do at MBB too (and perhaps you'll want to grind forever, who knows), but once you leave MBB you'll have a credential which will allow you to call the shots somewhere. The same is not true of v5-dom

There is something rewarding about corporate law. I do like that, over time, as you see a shit ton of deals and work a ton of hours, you learn how deals go. You don't freak out, you know who to ask for things, how to get shit done. You're no longer surprised that you need to make a CFIUS filing or you could be in trouble. But it's not making decisions - it's the process of become a more efficient functionary. And that's what it signals afterwards.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Apr 06, 2017 6:08 pm

jkpolk wrote:I think law students don't fully appreciate that corporate lawyers never, ever call the shots. The client always decides what to do. You keep track of the issues, present them in an ordered way, write up the documents - but you're not a "trusted advisor." You're a scribe who suggests the font and, if the client disagrees with your font suggestion (which is frequent), you defer to the client's judgement.

Most people who go to law school are unequipped to make real decisions - they are happy to sit in a dark room, with a fridge full of mountain dew or diet dr pepper, moving around commas while politely managing someone else's deal (until they just can't anymore). That's what you'll do at MBB too (and perhaps you'll want to grind forever, who knows), but once you leave MBB you'll have a credential which will allow you to call the shots somewhere. The same is not true of v5-dom

There is something rewarding about corporate law. I do like that, over time, as you see a shit ton of deals and work a ton of hours, you learn how deals go. You don't freak out, you know who to ask for things, how to get shit done. You're no longer surprised that you need to make a CFIUS filing or you could be in trouble. But it's not making decisions - it's the process of become a more efficient functionary. And that's what it signals afterwards.


3L going to MBB post-grad. This post more or less sums up my thought process on the matter.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby PeanutsNJam » Thu Apr 06, 2017 6:29 pm

jkpolk wrote:I think law students don't fully appreciate that corporate lawyers never, ever call the shots. The client always decides what to do. You keep track of the issues, present them in an ordered way, write up the documents - but you're not a "trusted advisor." You're a scribe who suggests the font and, if the client disagrees with your font suggestion (which is frequent), you defer to the client's judgement.

Most people who go to law school are unequipped to make real decisions - they are happy to sit in a dark room, with a fridge full of mountain dew or diet dr pepper, moving around commas while politely managing someone else's deal (until they just can't anymore). That's what you'll do at MBB too (and perhaps you'll want to grind forever, who knows), but once you leave MBB you'll have a credential which will allow you to call the shots somewhere. The same is not true of v5-dom

There is something rewarding about corporate law. I do like that, over time, as you see a shit ton of deals and work a ton of hours, you learn how deals go. You don't freak out, you know who to ask for things, how to get shit done. You're no longer surprised that you need to make a CFIUS filing or you could be in trouble. But it's not making decisions - it's the process of become a more efficient functionary. And that's what it signals afterwards.


I am skeptical that like an IBanker associate is a "shot caller" any more than an in-house counsel. Like, if biglaw corporate partner =/= shot caller because he doesn't MAKE deals, and only MAKING DEALS = shot calling, the only shot callers out there are people who own/start businesses, board of directors, and C-Suite. Not even general counsel is a shot caller under that metric. Probably PE/VC, but MBB -> PE is nowhere near a done deal.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Apr 06, 2017 6:44 pm

PeanutsNJam wrote:
jkpolk wrote:I think law students don't fully appreciate that corporate lawyers never, ever call the shots. The client always decides what to do. You keep track of the issues, present them in an ordered way, write up the documents - but you're not a "trusted advisor." You're a scribe who suggests the font and, if the client disagrees with your font suggestion (which is frequent), you defer to the client's judgement.

Most people who go to law school are unequipped to make real decisions - they are happy to sit in a dark room, with a fridge full of mountain dew or diet dr pepper, moving around commas while politely managing someone else's deal (until they just can't anymore). That's what you'll do at MBB too (and perhaps you'll want to grind forever, who knows), but once you leave MBB you'll have a credential which will allow you to call the shots somewhere. The same is not true of v5-dom

There is something rewarding about corporate law. I do like that, over time, as you see a shit ton of deals and work a ton of hours, you learn how deals go. You don't freak out, you know who to ask for things, how to get shit done. You're no longer surprised that you need to make a CFIUS filing or you could be in trouble. But it's not making decisions - it's the process of become a more efficient functionary. And that's what it signals afterwards.


I am skeptical that like an IBanker associate is a "shot caller" any more than an in-house counsel. Like, if biglaw corporate partner =/= shot caller because he doesn't MAKE deals, and only MAKING DEALS = shot calling, the only shot callers out there are people who own/start businesses, board of directors, and C-Suite. Not even general counsel is a shot caller under that metric. Probably PE/VC, but MBB -> PE is nowhere near a done deal.


Yeah, I agree with the above. With the exception of PE/VC clients I have worked with, everyone else still has to check with the real boss before deciding anything truly important. I agree that we corporate lawyers are just functionaries, but that is the case with almost everyone we work with. If you want to call the shots, you have to start your own thing or become the executive of a company.

With that said, if I had the option of going MBB, I probably would take it over big law. Although traveling every week sounds exhausting and most of my friends that have done it were burned out by year 2.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Internationalist » Thu Apr 06, 2017 6:56 pm

Does anyone have any experience with LEK or know their comp?

Have been told they do high-level work similar to MBB.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby curepure » Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:31 pm

Internationalist wrote:Does anyone have any experience with LEK or know their comp?

Have been told they do high-level work similar to MBB.


They do a lot of M&A market due diligence like Bain, don't require much travel, and don't really hire from law school.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Apr 06, 2017 10:35 pm

Internationalist wrote:Does anyone have any experience with LEK or know their comp?

Have been told they do high-level work similar to MBB.


Just want to point out that the reason no one talks about LEK isn't because they're good (they might actually do a higher % of "strategy" work than MBB), but because they simply don't have any real program of hiring JDs either out of law school or as laterals.

But yes, good firm. Comparable or higher comp to MBB at least at entry- to mid-range.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:55 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Internationalist wrote:Does anyone have any experience with LEK or know their comp?

Have been told they do high-level work similar to MBB.


Just want to point out that the reason no one talks about LEK isn't because they're good (they might actually do a higher % of "strategy" work than MBB), but because they simply don't have any real program of hiring JDs either out of law school or as laterals.

But yes, good firm. Comparable or higher comp to MBB at least at entry- to mid-range.


I worked at L.E.K. several years ago before leaving for another job. The work we did was comparable to what my friends did at MBB; it was a combination of due diligence for private equity firms (and some larger companies looking to buy smaller players) and strategy work for a variety of companies across a number of different sectors (e.g., healthcare, airlines, pharma, energy, CPG, etc.). There was very little travel (which I thought was a huge plus), but, unlike the MBB, L.E.K. does not do much implementation work, which sometimes meant that the client didn't always execute the strategy that our team put together. When I was there, I didn't know of any JD hires, either at the Associate (undergrad entry) or Consultant (MBA entry) levels; I also recently spoke with a friend at HYS who wanted to learn more about L.E.K. who said that L.E.K. told him that JD hires don't necessarily start at the Consultant level.
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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby jkpolk » Fri Apr 07, 2017 6:37 am

PeanutsNJam wrote:
jkpolk wrote:I think law students don't fully appreciate that corporate lawyers never, ever call the shots. The client always decides what to do. You keep track of the issues, present them in an ordered way, write up the documents - but you're not a "trusted advisor." You're a scribe who suggests the font and, if the client disagrees with your font suggestion (which is frequent), you defer to the client's judgement.

Most people who go to law school are unequipped to make real decisions - they are happy to sit in a dark room, with a fridge full of mountain dew or diet dr pepper, moving around commas while politely managing someone else's deal (until they just can't anymore). That's what you'll do at MBB too (and perhaps you'll want to grind forever, who knows), but once you leave MBB you'll have a credential which will allow you to call the shots somewhere. The same is not true of v5-dom

There is something rewarding about corporate law. I do like that, over time, as you see a shit ton of deals and work a ton of hours, you learn how deals go. You don't freak out, you know who to ask for things, how to get shit done. You're no longer surprised that you need to make a CFIUS filing or you could be in trouble. But it's not making decisions - it's the process of become a more efficient functionary. And that's what it signals afterwards.


I am skeptical that like an IBanker associate is a "shot caller" any more than an in-house counsel. Like, if biglaw corporate partner =/= shot caller because he doesn't MAKE deals, and only MAKING DEALS = shot calling, the only shot callers out there are people who own/start businesses, board of directors, and C-Suite. Not even general counsel is a shot caller under that metric. Probably PE/VC, but MBB -> PE is nowhere near a done deal.


Nah I mean more you're qualified to be like COO or VP . banking is just like law or consulting

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Apr 16, 2017 1:16 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I've been at a MBB for a couple years (straight from undergrad), and I have to say the firm itself makes a big difference. I have friends at all 3 firms and the cultures/people differ greatly.


Can someone speak to the cultural differences between the MBB? How do these different cultures translate in the interviews?

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby wiz » Sun Apr 16, 2017 3:10 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Corporate or lit

Also I'm guessing not Wachtell? Cause that would change things

IME many corporate associates would feel better suited in a management consulting role. Much of early corporate work is relatively mind numbing compared to what a consulting associate and manager get to work with. Whereas if you want to be a litigator, the consulting job will not provide a similar experience and you will miss out on actually practicing. I was at a management consulting firm after college and went to law school to practice, but if I had to choose between sig pages/corporate filings/ect. and what I saw the MBAs doing when I was an analyst, I'd rather be in consulting (for a few years, at least. Harder to say after ~year 4.)



What tier law school/class rank would someone have to be to get an MBB opportunity?


At least T14 to be considered at the fanciest shops. McKinsey and BCG recruit directly at T6 for pure JDs (or at least at Harvard and Columbia). I'm sure Bain accepts applications, I'm not sure where they go on campus. When looking at numbers at different schools, keep in mind that schools with popular JD-MBA programs, like Penn, Northwestern, Columbia, and Stanford, might have a number of folks going into consulting "from law school" in theory but actually through the business school.

Your class rank after 1L does not matter, or at least, does not matter nearly as much as it does for law firms. At a T6, you probably just want to avoid objectively bad grades, but consulting firms aren't interested in whether you aced Civ Pro. They will care about your prior work experience, your undergraduate major and degree, your case method, your analytics, and how well you can command a room.

I agree with basically everything you wrote, but Bain doesn't like JDs. Much harder to get through the door with them for interviews as just a pure JD than it is at McKinsey and BCG.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Apr 16, 2017 4:40 pm

wiz wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Corporate or lit

Also I'm guessing not Wachtell? Cause that would change things

IME many corporate associates would feel better suited in a management consulting role. Much of early corporate work is relatively mind numbing compared to what a consulting associate and manager get to work with. Whereas if you want to be a litigator, the consulting job will not provide a similar experience and you will miss out on actually practicing. I was at a management consulting firm after college and went to law school to practice, but if I had to choose between sig pages/corporate filings/ect. and what I saw the MBAs doing when I was an analyst, I'd rather be in consulting (for a few years, at least. Harder to say after ~year 4.)



What tier law school/class rank would someone have to be to get an MBB opportunity?


At least T14 to be considered at the fanciest shops. McKinsey and BCG recruit directly at T6 for pure JDs (or at least at Harvard and Columbia). I'm sure Bain accepts applications, I'm not sure where they go on campus. When looking at numbers at different schools, keep in mind that schools with popular JD-MBA programs, like Penn, Northwestern, Columbia, and Stanford, might have a number of folks going into consulting "from law school" in theory but actually through the business school.

Your class rank after 1L does not matter, or at least, does not matter nearly as much as it does for law firms. At a T6, you probably just want to avoid objectively bad grades, but consulting firms aren't interested in whether you aced Civ Pro. They will care about your prior work experience, your undergraduate major and degree, your case method, your analytics, and how well you can command a room.

I agree with basically everything you wrote, but Bain doesn't like JDs. Much harder to get through the door with them for interviews as just a pure JD than it is at McKinsey and BCG.


Interviewed with Bain earlier this year as an experienced hire. Bain started doing the formal experienced hiring this Jan, and is open to JDs.

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Re: Regretting consulting after law school?

Postby wiz » Sun Apr 16, 2017 4:42 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
wiz wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Corporate or lit

Also I'm guessing not Wachtell? Cause that would change things

IME many corporate associates would feel better suited in a management consulting role. Much of early corporate work is relatively mind numbing compared to what a consulting associate and manager get to work with. Whereas if you want to be a litigator, the consulting job will not provide a similar experience and you will miss out on actually practicing. I was at a management consulting firm after college and went to law school to practice, but if I had to choose between sig pages/corporate filings/ect. and what I saw the MBAs doing when I was an analyst, I'd rather be in consulting (for a few years, at least. Harder to say after ~year 4.)



What tier law school/class rank would someone have to be to get an MBB opportunity?


At least T14 to be considered at the fanciest shops. McKinsey and BCG recruit directly at T6 for pure JDs (or at least at Harvard and Columbia). I'm sure Bain accepts applications, I'm not sure where they go on campus. When looking at numbers at different schools, keep in mind that schools with popular JD-MBA programs, like Penn, Northwestern, Columbia, and Stanford, might have a number of folks going into consulting "from law school" in theory but actually through the business school.

Your class rank after 1L does not matter, or at least, does not matter nearly as much as it does for law firms. At a T6, you probably just want to avoid objectively bad grades, but consulting firms aren't interested in whether you aced Civ Pro. They will care about your prior work experience, your undergraduate major and degree, your case method, your analytics, and how well you can command a room.

I agree with basically everything you wrote, but Bain doesn't like JDs. Much harder to get through the door with them for interviews as just a pure JD than it is at McKinsey and BCG.


Interviewed with Bain earlier this year as an experienced hire. Bain started doing the formal experienced hiring this Jan, and is open to JDs.

I was talking about JDs straight out of law school; I'm sure your experience helped. Maybe Bain is more open to fresh JDs now, too, but I still think it would be harder to get an actual interview there than at McKinsey/BCG, which actually recruit at law schools.



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