How can I thank someone for fw-ing my resume for a job I didn't end up taking?

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Anonymous User
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How can I thank someone for fw-ing my resume for a job I didn't end up taking?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Mar 19, 2017 10:00 pm

Long story short, an alum partner forwarded my resume for consideration for a position. I got interviewed for the position and received an offer. However, I decided to accept an offer at another firm.

How should I go about thanking the alum partner? I already declined the offer with HR.


And, how can I go about thanking some of the partners who interviewed me at this point? I thought I had a good connection to the 2 who really wanted to bring me on.

I appreciate any suggestions!

ejs2017
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:48 pm

Re: How can I thank someone for fw-ing my resume for a job I didn't end up taking?

Postby ejs2017 » Tue Mar 28, 2017 4:11 pm

Experienced attorney, long-time lurker, first time poster here. In my humble opinion, any expression of gratitude in this world goes a long way. To begin with, legal communities can be small. Lawyers know one another. Reputations are built and destroyed as much by a lawyer's character as the results a lawyer achieves.

In your case, you never know when you may need to call on your referral source for another referral. A firm implosion, a lay-off, or a personality conflict arises requiring you to renew your job search.

A heartfelt, "I just wanted to say how much I appreciated your willingness to pass on my CV" letter may bode well for you in the future. In the case of the interviewing partners, it never hurts to reach out to say that it was great meeting them and that you appreciated the opportunity they afforded you to interview. First, it says a lot about your character. Second, you're maintaining a contact that you may need in the future.

I remember early in my career receiving a rejection letter from a partner at a firm where I really wanted to work. Times were tough for me (and in my location in general) and each rejection letter I received was a serious blow to my ego and to my hopes. You know how generic, and sometimes callous, the rejections can be (that is, if you even receive one rather than simply winding up in someone's circular file.)

This particular partner made a point of telling me that he was genuinely impressed by my qualifications, that he recognized how tough it was to be looking for a job particularly at that time in that market, but that his firm, unfortunately, was not in hiring mode. He was very supportive, expressed his confidence that I would find something, and invited me to remain in touch.

I went out on a limb and I made a point to send a brief reply letter to the partner indicating how much I appreciated his kind words. Soon after when I finally found work, I had the pleasure of working with this individual as co-counsel on a case. We talked about it and he was genuinely appreciative. He became a friend in my career and a valuable resource in later job searches as my career evolved.

Anonymous User
Posts: 285559
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: How can I thank someone for fw-ing my resume for a job I didn't end up taking?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:29 pm

ejs2017 wrote:Experienced attorney, long-time lurker, first time poster here. In my humble opinion, any expression of gratitude in this world goes a long way. To begin with, legal communities can be small. Lawyers know one another. Reputations are built and destroyed as much by a lawyer's character as the results a lawyer achieves.

In your case, you never know when you may need to call on your referral source for another referral. A firm implosion, a lay-off, or a personality conflict arises requiring you to renew your job search.

A heartfelt, "I just wanted to say how much I appreciated your willingness to pass on my CV" letter may bode well for you in the future. In the case of the interviewing partners, it never hurts to reach out to say that it was great meeting them and that you appreciated the opportunity they afforded you to interview. First, it says a lot about your character. Second, you're maintaining a contact that you may need in the future.

I remember early in my career receiving a rejection letter from a partner at a firm where I really wanted to work. Times were tough for me (and in my location in general) and each rejection letter I received was a serious blow to my ego and to my hopes. You know how generic, and sometimes callous, the rejections can be (that is, if you even receive one rather than simply winding up in someone's circular file.)

This particular partner made a point of telling me that he was genuinely impressed by my qualifications, that he recognized how tough it was to be looking for a job particularly at that time in that market, but that his firm, unfortunately, was not in hiring mode. He was very supportive, expressed his confidence that I would find something, and invited me to remain in touch.

I went out on a limb and I made a point to send a brief reply letter to the partner indicating how much I appreciated his kind words. Soon after when I finally found work, I had the pleasure of working with this individual as co-counsel on a case. We talked about it and he was genuinely appreciative. He became a friend in my career and a valuable resource in later job searches as my career evolved.


OP here. Thanks for your insight. I had considered the above (that I might cross paths again with the partner who fw-ed my resume), so I sent him a thank you email letting him know I truly appreciated his time and truly enjoyed talking to all his colleagues. I kept it grateful, polite, and succinct (I imagine he didn't have time for anything longer). Ruled out handwritten thank you letter based on TLS comments.




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