Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

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Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:30 pm

My practice group leader recently talked to me about possibly taking a secondment with a client. I said I was interested in learning more.

Are there any downsides to taking a secondment? How does it look on your resume?
Obviously, I know that it looks good for inhouse positions. Does it look good if you want to move to another firm?

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Re: Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:36 pm

Don't know much about secondments but if your boss asked it must be because he/she trusts in you. I wouldn't send a shitty associate to a client... anyway wouldn't it help a lot for lateraling to that client down the road?

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wiseowl

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Re: Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

Postby wiseowl » Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:32 pm

The downside is how weird and awkward the word "secondment" is.

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nealric

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Re: Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

Postby nealric » Thu Dec 15, 2016 1:35 pm

How long is it? Will they pro-rate hours for bonus eligibility? Is it a good client you would want to work for?

The downside of secondment is that you are out-of-sight, out of mind to the firm. Sometimes, it means they are hoping the client will take you on permanently. If you want to go to the client, that could be a good thing.

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Re: Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 15, 2016 4:29 pm

Op here: it is for 6 months and it is 2 days a week. Not a full-time secondment. Client isn't bad but not the industry I want to be in. Not sure about bonus and stuff like that.

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Re: Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 15, 2016 6:18 pm

I've been on secondment several months for a few days a week. I think it depends on how you sell the experience. I've had the ability to gain experience in areas of law that I would not be able to get back at the office. Plus, it gets me out of that place.

The real challenge will be separating secondment time from firm time. Partners still harass me and want work done while I'm on secondment.

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Re: Is There a Downside to Taking a Secondment?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:51 pm

Anonymous User wrote:The real challenge will be separating secondment time from firm time. Partners still harass me and want work done while I'm on secondment.


Someone at my firm is on a secondment part time and this is their biggest issue. Partners still tend to treat associates like they are on full-time, and its hard managing both workloads.

Plus, their secondment isn't in the same city so it requires travel + hotel stays every week. And what was supposed to be a 6 month secondment has now turned into 9 months, with little sign that the arrangement will end.

Secondments can be a great transition to in-house at a good client, but it all depends on the particulars of the secondment itself and whether you can successfully reduce your firm workload while doing it.



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