How do 3Ls network to get a job?

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How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:29 pm

Network, network, network... I hear it all the time.

But for 3Ls, how do we do this? Just call lawyers up at a target firm to ask them to explain about the firm? Then what??? What if there are no alum at that firm since I am an out-of-state graduate?

I don't know what to do to network as a 3L....

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:11 pm

Are any of your past or current professors adjuncts who are at a firm and just teach on the side? If so, contact them.

Do any of your past or current professors have past experiences with a firm or with a practice area or market (city) that you are targeting? If so, contact them.

Go to any lunch talks where the topic is related to your practice areas of interest or where the speaker is from or has ties to your target markets.

Obviously, contact alums. Undergrad alums too.

It seems like you are going to school in Market A and are looking for a job in Market B? Look for even non-alums in Market B who went to other law schools or otherwise have ties to Market A. [Riskier and depends on the particulars, obviously.]

Basically, contact as many people as you can. Prioritize the stronger connections, of course, but if you have few direct connections (friends, alums), then don't be too afraid to branch out.

Some of my best networking leads were all kind of strained, or less direct than contacting an alum, anyway.

One was a partner and interviewer at a firm in my target market. He was not an alum of my law school. He had no connections to my home region or law school region. But we hit it off very well during interviews. I did not get an offer. Later, I contacted him, expecting nothing to come of it except perhaps some embarrassment. It was a huge stretch, right? And I didn't even get an offer there. But he offered to meet with me, told me in person that I was a hair away from an offer and that they had to downsize their class size that year [who knows if this is true, but it was nice to hear regardless, heh], and offered to introduce me to 4 partners at different firms in my target market! Three of those partners spoke with me, via phone or in person, and those connections were varying degrees of successful (though I didn't get a job from any of them).

Another was a professor of a small, fluffy seminar I took. I very rarely spoke up in classes, but I enjoyed this class, actually spoke from time to time, and got along well with the professor. Once during office hours she asked what I was doing after graduation and I confessed that I didn't have a job lined up, but that I was interested in [practice areas] in [markets]. On paper she had no connections to my target markets, but it turns out she did have connections that she was happy to introduce me to. None of these connections resulted in a job, either, but they were (and are) good connections to have. And, frankly, practice makes perfect.

Finally, there was a professor of a seminar that was directly related to my practice area of interest who was in private practice full time and just taught this one class. I reached out to him and now I work for him in a job that I'm extremely happy with.

Never give up. Breaks are ok, as long as they don't linger indefinitely. Put yourself out there. Constantly. Practice and exposure help you hone selling yourself (without being pushy). And it's still a numbers game, just like mass mailing was. The game is just a little different. It's harder and more draining, but it is what you need to do. Push through. You can do it.

Best of luck to you.

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:11 pm

accidental double post

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 08, 2016 7:50 pm

wow. Thanks a million!

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Dec 17, 2016 8:45 pm

You're welcome. Good luck out there.

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Dec 17, 2016 9:19 pm

If you have friends that worked at firms as 2L summer associates, then it may be worth it to ask if they can put you in touch with any of the attorneys at their respective firms. May yield better results than just cold e-mailing people. Good luck!

RaceJudicata

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby RaceJudicata » Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:06 pm

Anonymous User wrote:If you have friends that worked at firms as 2L summer associates, then it may be worth it to ask if they can put you in touch with any of the attorneys at their respective firms. May yield better results than just cold e-mailing people. Good luck!


I definitely would not feel comfortable recommending someone or putting them in contact w partners I worked with over the summer. maybe I'd put them in contact with certain associates. Just not worth it to damage my reputation... which sounds shitty, but my 0.02

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:55 pm

RaceJudicata wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:If you have friends that worked at firms as 2L summer associates, then it may be worth it to ask if they can put you in touch with any of the attorneys at their respective firms. May yield better results than just cold e-mailing people. Good luck!


I definitely would not feel comfortable recommending someone or putting them in contact w partners I worked with over the summer. maybe I'd put them in contact with certain associates. Just not worth it to damage my reputation... which sounds shitty, but my 0.02


Agreed. I worked at a firm that's well-known for being active in 3L hiring. We were told to gather resumes, cover letters, and transcripts from friends and forward them directly to recruiting. It was made clear that we should only recommend people within the firm's hiring guidelines.

I would not refer them to partners or to associates.

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Dec 17, 2016 11:04 pm

I've done this before and someone else did this for me. It's something only your best friends would do, the people you'd give a kidney to, and it has no value because the recommendation on a junior associate or entering associate carries no weight at all beyond being asked what they're like, which requires them to already be under consideration.

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 20, 2016 5:56 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
RaceJudicata wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:If you have friends that worked at firms as 2L summer associates, then it may be worth it to ask if they can put you in touch with any of the attorneys at their respective firms. May yield better results than just cold e-mailing people. Good luck!


I definitely would not feel comfortable recommending someone or putting them in contact w partners I worked with over the summer. maybe I'd put them in contact with certain associates. Just not worth it to damage my reputation... which sounds shitty, but my 0.02


Agreed. I worked at a firm that's well-known for being active in 3L hiring. We were told to gather resumes, cover letters, and transcripts from friends and forward them directly to recruiting. It was made clear that we should only recommend people within the firm's hiring guidelines.

I would not refer them to partners or to associates.


What firm was this that actively hired 3Ls?

juanlove

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Re: How do 3Ls network to get a job?

Postby juanlove » Wed Dec 21, 2016 11:56 am

OP asked how to network as a 3L. I wanted to add my thoughts here, since networking is ultimately how I got my offer. Full disclosure: My job market may be different from yours because I'm a non-traditional student with some experience in IP. But, I think any 3L could use this approach. Here are five suggestions for how to approach networking as a 3L:

1. Do a lot of informational interviews. Assuming you are genuinely interested in a particular practice area, find attorneys who share that interest and contact them to request a brief (15 minute) meeting/call so you can ask the attorney questions about his or her career. Contact alumni first.

Pro tip: Keep emails short and suggest meetings at specific days and times, closing for example with "Are you available to speak briefly with me next week? I could give you a call Tuesday afternoon."

2. Keep in touch. Make sure everyone who you ALREADY know is familiar with why you went to law school and what you hope to do when you graduate. The best job leads usually come from people you know. Most students already know someone in a legal- or legal-related field, so while suggestion #1 above is focused on making new contacts, this suggestion is focused on finding leads through your existing contacts.

Pro tip: Making a list or a spreadsheet can help you keep track of your conversations. Set a goal of having substantive conversations or emails with 100 people during the next semester.

3. Be authentic when you "network." I like to travel, fly fish, and watch football. If you don't like football, change the subject or talk about why you don't like football. People can spot a faker. Plus networking, like law school, is a marathon not a sprint. You will get more out of the process if you get to know the people you meet, and help them get to know you, rather than just "networking to get a job."

Pro tip: "How do you spend your time outside of work?" can be a good ice breaker. "How to Talk to Anyone: 92 Little Tricks" is a decent book on this subject.

4. Get out of the law school when you can. CLEs can be a good way to both gain professional experience and make new contacts. Volunteering can also be beneficial. It can be easier to make good contacts outside of the law school, given you may be the only law student in the room who is looking for a job.

Pro tip: Check with the American Bar Association and your state's local bar association to see whether you qualify for reduced-cost membership. These organizations also have online calendars of events.

5. Be the Associate your target firms want to hire. To put it another way, focus your efforts on making contacts that help you figure out where you fit best. You can find lists of law firms in your area, and those lists can help you learn what types of associates those firms hire. Find the ten firms in your practice area and geography where it looks like you would be a good fit.

Pro tip: You could use the NALP directory at http://www.nalpdirectory.com to start your search for target firms.

Good luck!



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