Recommended Recruiters for Lateraling to a New Practice Area

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Recommended Recruiters for Lateraling to a New Practice Area

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:00 pm

There are threads from a few years back, but this industry changes year to year. I'm looking for recommended legal recruiters, particularly ones experienced in helping associates change practice areas. My observation is that most recruiters will be ready and willing to work with any associate, but don't have the attorney's best interests in mind and will often just put you on the bottom of their pile. I've also realized that many recruiters will force feed you a script for certain questions that require you to lie knowing it's a lie. In addition to ethical issues, most recruiters are excellent at selling lies and assume everyone is, but normal people tend to convey some kind of non-verbal tell. At the same time, by working with one recruiter any respectable recruiter won't want to work with you, because unless you lie, having another recruiter depletes your value.

My question is really two-fold: (1) how do you essentially fire one recruiter for another, and (2) which recruiters are actively interested in your long term success? I don't want to lie to anybody, particularly one I'm developing a business relationship based on trust with but also don't want to make myself less valuable because I naively bought into recruiters who can talk the talk but only have access to the same information as me.

While all recruiters want to get paid, I'd imagine that just like agents, you would have those concerned with only one contract and those concerned with both present and future contracts. My worry is that if I am naturally bad at a certain area of law, even if it's the easiest area for me to get a job in, it wouldn't benefit me long term because I'm spending my key development years pursuing something with a low ceiling.

If anyone has insight on particular areas I may be well suited for, please let me know. To provide some personal information on why I think I'd be disproportionately good at some areas of law and disproportionately bad at others, at the risk of sounding special snowflakey, my resume and transcript don't adequately represent me, because they suggest someone generally smart when the reality is I'm probably the shiniest needle in the haystack at some things and Forrest Gumpian at others.

My reason for this is even though I don't talk about it much and very few people know, I suffered a mild brain injury to the broca's area in a car accident as an infant. This is the area responsible for speech production, fine motor skills, etc. I was very lucky, and have had a normal happy life but only because other areas adapted to do most of what the broca's area does. In layman's terms, my speech and motor skill milestones were delayed, but anything related to pattern recognition and visual or spatial recognition developed very quickly.

Fast forward a few decades, and you have someone who seems intelligent on paper, but frequently mixing up words and struggles to recognize typos, but is perceived as brilliant in anything involving quick wit or the ability to analyze different points of view. Basically, if you gave a test to a million random people that rewarded writing quickly, thinking technically and creatively simultaneously and was strictly timed but didn't penalize mistakes or grammar, it's likely I'd place first. I've realized that some practice areas would play up my strengths and play down my weaknesses.

Previously, I've manipulated my environment to play to my strengths by making friends and helping them with certain tasks in exchange for their help with others. This is more difficult when the things you're good at are not helpful to the other person. I have a good idea of what I would be successful in, but most recruiters prioritize an easy commission with the least amount of time and leg work possible. This is understandable given their economic incentives, which is why I need a recruiter who will value my long term success. The reality is that we're hardwired to vividly remember those who help us become successful and there is significantly monetary value in being vividly remembered by successful people. One would assume that recruiters focused on the big picture and who believe in you (basically, the ones you'd want to work with) would put some financial weight on their clients' long term success.

itbdvorm

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Re: Recommended Recruiters for Lateraling to a New Practice Area

Postby itbdvorm » Tue Sep 20, 2016 10:04 pm

Anonymous User wrote:There are threads from a few years back, but this industry changes year to year. I'm looking for recommended legal recruiters, particularly ones experienced in helping associates change practice areas. My observation is that most recruiters will be ready and willing to work with any associate, but don't have the attorney's best interests in mind and will often just put you on the bottom of their pile. I've also realized that many recruiters will force feed you a script for certain questions that require you to lie knowing it's a lie. In addition to ethical issues, most recruiters are excellent at selling lies and assume everyone is, but normal people tend to convey some kind of non-verbal tell. At the same time, by working with one recruiter any respectable recruiter won't want to work with you, because unless you lie, having another recruiter depletes your value.

My question is really two-fold: (1) how do you essentially fire one recruiter for another, and (2) which recruiters are actively interested in your long term success? I don't want to lie to anybody, particularly one I'm developing a business relationship based on trust with but also don't want to make myself less valuable because I naively bought into recruiters who can talk the talk but only have access to the same information as me.

While all recruiters want to get paid, I'd imagine that just like agents, you would have those concerned with only one contract and those concerned with both present and future contracts. My worry is that if I am naturally bad at a certain area of law, even if it's the easiest area for me to get a job in, it wouldn't benefit me long term because I'm spending my key development years pursuing something with a low ceiling.

If anyone has insight on particular areas I may be well suited for, please let me know. To provide some personal information on why I think I'd be disproportionately good at some areas of law and disproportionately bad at others, at the risk of sounding special snowflakey, my resume and transcript don't adequately represent me, because they suggest someone generally smart when the reality is I'm probably the shiniest needle in the haystack at some things and Forrest Gumpian at others.

My reason for this is even though I don't talk about it much and very few people know, I suffered a mild brain injury to the broca's area in a car accident as an infant. This is the area responsible for speech production, fine motor skills, etc. I was very lucky, and have had a normal happy life but only because other areas adapted to do most of what the broca's area does. In layman's terms, my speech and motor skill milestones were delayed, but anything related to pattern recognition and visual or spatial recognition developed very quickly.

Fast forward a few decades, and you have someone who seems intelligent on paper, but frequently mixing up words and struggles to recognize typos, but is perceived as brilliant in anything involving quick wit or the ability to analyze different points of view. Basically, if you gave a test to a million random people that rewarded writing quickly, thinking technically and creatively simultaneously and was strictly timed but didn't penalize mistakes or grammar, it's likely I'd place first. I've realized that some practice areas would play up my strengths and play down my weaknesses.

Previously, I've manipulated my environment to play to my strengths by making friends and helping them with certain tasks in exchange for their help with others. This is more difficult when the things you're good at are not helpful to the other person. I have a good idea of what I would be successful in, but most recruiters prioritize an easy commission with the least amount of time and leg work possible. This is understandable given their economic incentives, which is why I need a recruiter who will value my long term success. The reality is that we're hardwired to vividly remember those who help us become successful and there is significantly monetary value in being vividly remembered by successful people. One would assume that recruiters focused on the big picture and who believe in you (basically, the ones you'd want to work with) would put some financial weight on their clients' long term success.


No idea re: recruiters.

But tax or appellate law. Or regulatory work.

You are unfortunately very ill-suited to be a corporate or litigation junior given these specific flaws in your skillset. But if you truly can meet the hurdles you set, the super-specialized areas of law will be good for you.



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