Shooting myself in the foot?

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Shooting myself in the foot?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jul 17, 2016 11:51 am

Hey everyone,

I'm a SA at a V50 on the east coast. I would like to start as a first year at another office (busy, growing office with practice areas in line with what group i will be joining). I mentioned this to my current firm last summer after I received the SA offer, and the hiring partner pitched the post-summer transfer as an idea to dissuade me from choosing a different firm out there. I haven't brought it up with anyone since that conversation, but the summer is coming to an end and I'd like to start making moves.

Some more info that might be relevant: the firm is on the more liberal side when it comes to people moving among offices, and it liberally staffs deals cross-office. I've also coincidentally been working a lot this summer for a mid-level in the office I am interested in and have developed a good relationship with her. I received a good midsummer review - I think it was a little better than the standard positive feedback, but I also know that the bar is very low so that probably is barely a factor here.

My question is this: if I bring this up with the legal recruiting person in my office before receiving an offer, would that be a bad idea? She's been working closely with the summers and I feel like I can trust her, plus she is likely the person who will know the most about the demand for juniors in each office and firm policy. But I also know that there is probably at least some risk in expressing this to recruiting before you have an offer in hand. My other options would be to reach out to the attorneys I have been working with (both at my current office and the other office), but I feel like there are risks with that as well.

I know this isn't the first post to ask a question like this, but there hasn't been a ton of information about how and when to actually start this conversation. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you!

sflyr2016

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Re: Shooting myself in the foot?

Postby sflyr2016 » Sun Jul 17, 2016 11:57 am

Anonymous User wrote:Hey everyone,

I'm a SA at a V50 on the east coast. I would like to start as a first year at another office (busy, growing office with practice areas in line with what group i will be joining). I mentioned this to my current firm last summer after I received the SA offer, and the hiring partner pitched the post-summer transfer as an idea to dissuade me from choosing a different firm out there. I haven't brought it up with anyone since that conversation, but the summer is coming to an end and I'd like to start making moves.

Some more info that might be relevant: the firm is on the more liberal side when it comes to people moving among offices, and it liberally staffs deals cross-office. I've also coincidentally been working a lot this summer for a mid-level in the office I am interested in and have developed a good relationship with her. I received a good midsummer review - I think it was a little better than the standard positive feedback, but I also know that the bar is very low so that probably is barely a factor here.

My question is this: if I bring this up with the legal recruiting person in my office before receiving an offer, would that be a bad idea? She's been working closely with the summers and I feel like I can trust her, plus she is likely the person who will know the most about the demand for juniors in each office and firm policy. But I also know that there is probably at least some risk in expressing this to recruiting before you have an offer in hand. My other options would be to reach out to the attorneys I have been working with (both at my current office and the other office), but I feel like there are risks with that as well.

I know this isn't the first post to ask a question like this, but there hasn't been a ton of information about how and when to actually start this conversation. Any advice is greatly appreciated. Thank you!


Wait until you receive an offer. Before accepting, and if it's possible to do so, schedule a lunch or meeting with whomever you think is the right person to speak to about this and let them know that you're thrilled to work there, and are inclined to accept, but want to reiterate your interest in working in another office. At least, that's how I would do it.

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Re: Shooting myself in the foot?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jul 17, 2016 12:32 pm

The recruiting personnel work for the firm, not for you.

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Re: Shooting myself in the foot?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jul 17, 2016 2:42 pm

Anonymous User wrote:The recruiting personnel work for the firm, not for you.


This isn't very helpful. You could argue that they work for the people who work for the firm, and are therefore in the best position to direct you on how likely/unlikely a transfer is.

Anonymous User
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Re: Shooting myself in the foot?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jul 17, 2016 4:06 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:The recruiting personnel work for the firm, not for you.


This isn't very helpful. You could argue that they work for the people who work for the firm, and are therefore in the best position to direct you on how likely/unlikely a transfer is.


Let me be more clear. You should basically assume anything you say to recruiting personnel are shared with the attorneys in charge of recruiting. If you wouldn't say it to them, you should think twice about saying it to recruiting.

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Re: Shooting myself in the foot?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Jul 18, 2016 1:20 pm

I'm in a similar position. I was cross-staffed on deals with another office that I'm interested in (very small office), but I loved working with that office, and would prefer to live there. The associate in the smaller office brought up the idea of me joining them, and then my hiring partner also asked about whether I'd want to live/work there instead (I think a partner from the smaller office called our hiring partner to ask about stealing me for their office, because he told me he was going to do something along those lines if I was serious about working in said smaller office).

Both offices have seemed completely open to the idea, but this could be firm specific. I got a little lucky because I didn't have to bring it up on my own, but everyone involved said it seemed like it would be fine, but that they couldn't make any promises because they'd have to have conversations with a few other people.

Currently an SA, so I haven't received an offer in either office yet. I also have made sure to express interest/enthusiasm in working with both offices (even if my living preference is to live and work in smaller office), but reiterating how much I've liked working with the people in the bigger office, and I'd be happy to continue working with them if they could use my help (basically having bigger office as a secondary office if smaller office ever gets slow or big one gets super busy).

Anonymous User
Posts: 327280
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Shooting myself in the foot?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Jul 18, 2016 4:38 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I'm in a similar position. I was cross-staffed on deals with another office that I'm interested in (very small office), but I loved working with that office, and would prefer to live there. The associate in the smaller office brought up the idea of me joining them, and then my hiring partner also asked about whether I'd want to live/work there instead (I think a partner from the smaller office called our hiring partner to ask about stealing me for their office, because he told me he was going to do something along those lines if I was serious about working in said smaller office).

Both offices have seemed completely open to the idea, but this could be firm specific. I got a little lucky because I didn't have to bring it up on my own, but everyone involved said it seemed like it would be fine, but that they couldn't make any promises because they'd have to have conversations with a few other people.

Currently an SA, so I haven't received an offer in either office yet. I also have made sure to express interest/enthusiasm in working with both offices (even if my living preference is to live and work in smaller office), but reiterating how much I've liked working with the people in the bigger office, and I'd be happy to continue working with them if they could use my help (basically having bigger office as a secondary office if smaller office ever gets slow or big one gets super busy).


That does sound pretty similar to mine. Do you have any ties to the market with the smaller office?

How did you first bring it up with the recruiting people? At this point it's only been that one conversation (which was a year ago) and a few brief remarks with the associate in the other office. I haven't decided how to actually transition that into a full-on conversation with the recruiting team in my office. im thinking it's okay to bring it up pre-offer, so that they could potentially consolidate the offer/no offer and transfer/no transfer conversation into one.



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