ITT: Describe your SA

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barkschool
Posts: 580
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2015 12:05 am

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby barkschool » Fri Sep 16, 2016 2:07 pm

filling this out is more work than my summer

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Sep 16, 2016 2:51 pm

BASIC INFORMATION
1. What market did you work in (e.g., New York City, Atlanta, Charlotte, the Midwest, etc.)? NY and London
2. What kind of firm was it (e.g., BigLaw, MidLaw, SmallLaw, etc.)? Biglaw
3. What year did you do your SA? Was it a 1L SA or a 2L SA? 2L SA
4. What was the firm or firm-range (e.g., DLA Piper, V30, V50-60, etc.)? Magic Circle
5. What sort of work did you do (e.g., all litigation, mostly corporate, securities, etc.)? NY - transactional hodgepodge; London - cap markets

CONTENT
1. What kind of assignments did you get? Due diligence, legal research, form checks, drafting ancillary documents, turning hand markups from senior associates.
2. Was it a “working summer” or a more of a “party summer?” Working summer
Did social functions seem to be considered more important than the assignments you received?
In New York, mostly. No one could "skip" assignments for social functions, but the assignment coordinators were all aware of the social events and dished out work with that in mind. The few Spanish-fluent summers ended up missing some events to work on some LatAm deals where the supervising attorneys told them to work instead of going to the event, but none of the "big" events.
London was different; instead of balancing client-billed work with required social events, we were given a lot of diligence and research projects related to ongoing deals, with very few short turn-around deadlines. But then, since we weren't being used as first-year associates like we were in New York, whenever there was a deal deadline, all the junior associates who weren't on holiday would be too swamped to go to any of the social events, so despite having fewer social events, we had pretty low turnout and even a canceled event because not enough attorneys could make it out.
Did it feel like a 12-week-long job interview?
Yes. I'm going to use this space to urge everyone to take Second Looks after they do callbacks, and to speak to as many people as you can about the firms you are considering before you accept an offer, because if you don't, you are going to be exhausted at the end of the summer. You will likely be working in areas of the law where you have little to no academic or practical experience, where you will be expected to do your best work, even if there isn't an expectation of perfection. Combine that with concerns about making a good impression, anxiety about getting a full-time job, a lot more alcohol than you are probably expecting, and other real-life concerns as they pop up during your 10-12 week summer, and you have a recipe for exhaustion, even in the best of circumstances. If you have to do all that while continuously pretending, day-in and day-out, like you get along with everyone and fit in at the firm, then you are setting yourself up for extremely early burnout
Did they tell you at the beginning that everyone would receive offers or that not everyone would? Did they equivocate at all (e.g., “generally, everyone gets an offer”)? Or did they not bring offer prospects up at all? Recruiting told us "not to worry" at the beginning of the summer, but historically the firm has no-offered one or two summers each year. Thankfully, this year everyone got an offer.
What kind of events did they put on? Summer lunches were a big deal in New York. We usually had one big event every week, and the junior associates are given quite a budget to put on a hell of a show one night in the second half of the summer.
3. What was the outcome of the SA?
Did you get an offer? Yes.
Did anyone in you Summer Class get no-offered? No.
Did you (or do you plan to) return to the firm as an Associate? Yes, I'll be returning as a full-time associate.

estefanchanning
Posts: 76
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Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby estefanchanning » Fri Sep 16, 2016 3:04 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I summered in Los Angeles last summer (2015) at a roughly 80-100 attorney office (think White & Case, Winston & Strawn, Milbank, Perkins Coie, etc.). My summer was very laid back, fun, yet substantive. Summer associates were given assignments that normal first-years were given and worked directly with partners, senior associates, and midlevel/juniors. The culture was absolutely awesome...way better than I anticipated and the associates were a tight knit group (read: a lot of drinking). We had firm-sponsored events every week, sometimes two in a week, and they were incredible. The firm definitely spared no expense and it was great to see a lot of associates and even partners show up at most of the events. We also went to impromptu happy hours usually a couple times a week, which the firm would pick up the tab.

I rotated through a few different practice groups, and all groups were very busy, which was nice. Since the firm was busy we were thrown onto deal teams and immediately were sitting in on client conference calls, reading over purchase agreements, drafting ancillary documents, etc. I did way more substantive work than anticipated, and partners and associates took the time out of their days to go over the assignments with you to give you feedback, which consisted of both praise and constructive tips.

I think the latest I ever stayed at the office was about 6:30, and most days I was out by 5:30. Depending on which rotation I was in, the days started at different times. For instance, one practice group started right at 9 every morning, whereas another started around 9:45/10am. Coffee runs were plentiful, I didn't pay for a single lunch the entire summer (associates were always willing to go to lunch with summers for free lunch), and the firm often had smoothie bars, gelato bars, and make your own waffle/bonsai bowls over the course of the summer. There's no way leaving at 5:30 everyday was an accurate representation of being an actual associate, as I know associates were often working later than that (I was on a lot of deal emails and getting emails until 8 or 9pm some nights), but associates were forthcoming in letting us know that there was absolutely no facetime requirement and most evening work was done from home.

Turnover at my particular firm is very low by biglaw standards, and the firm doesn't seem to push anyone out, which was nice to know (not that I intend to stay forever). There were a few super-associates (8-10 years) and a few special counsel, but everyone seemed pretty job-secure. Overall it was a great summer and I really love my firm. Happy to answer answer any questions via PM -- if you're interested, let me know and I'll PM you.



Hi OP, Can you please PM me?

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Minnietron
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Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2014 12:28 am

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby Minnietron » Fri Sep 16, 2016 3:40 pm

barkschool wrote:filling this out is more work than my summer

Where did you summer? Because I want that gig!

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North
Posts: 4041
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Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby North » Sat Sep 17, 2016 1:49 am

barkschool wrote:filling this out is more work than my summer

:lol:

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GoogleWasMyIdea
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2015 3:47 pm

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby GoogleWasMyIdea » Sat Sep 17, 2016 9:23 am

Anonymous User wrote:BASIC INFORMATION
1. What market did you work in (e.g., New York City, Atlanta, Charlotte, the Midwest, etc.)? NY and London
2. What kind of firm was it (e.g., BigLaw, MidLaw, SmallLaw, etc.)? Biglaw
3. What year did you do your SA? Was it a 1L SA or a 2L SA? 2L SA
4. What was the firm or firm-range (e.g., DLA Piper, V30, V50-60, etc.)? Magic Circle
5. What sort of work did you do (e.g., all litigation, mostly corporate, securities, etc.)? NY - transactional hodgepodge; London - cap markets

CONTENT
1. What kind of assignments did you get? Due diligence, legal research, form checks, drafting ancillary documents, turning hand markups from senior associates.
2. Was it a “working summer” or a more of a “party summer?” Working summer
Did social functions seem to be considered more important than the assignments you received?
In New York, mostly. No one could "skip" assignments for social functions, but the assignment coordinators were all aware of the social events and dished out work with that in mind. The few Spanish-fluent summers ended up missing some events to work on some LatAm deals where the supervising attorneys told them to work instead of going to the event, but none of the "big" events.
London was different; instead of balancing client-billed work with required social events, we were given a lot of diligence and research projects related to ongoing deals, with very few short turn-around deadlines. But then, since we weren't being used as first-year associates like we were in New York, whenever there was a deal deadline, all the junior associates who weren't on holiday would be too swamped to go to any of the social events, so despite having fewer social events, we had pretty low turnout and even a canceled event because not enough attorneys could make it out.
Did it feel like a 12-week-long job interview?
Yes. I'm going to use this space to urge everyone to take Second Looks after they do callbacks, and to speak to as many people as you can about the firms you are considering before you accept an offer, because if you don't, you are going to be exhausted at the end of the summer. You will likely be working in areas of the law where you have little to no academic or practical experience, where you will be expected to do your best work, even if there isn't an expectation of perfection. Combine that with concerns about making a good impression, anxiety about getting a full-time job, a lot more alcohol than you are probably expecting, and other real-life concerns as they pop up during your 10-12 week summer, and you have a recipe for exhaustion, even in the best of circumstances. If you have to do all that while continuously pretending, day-in and day-out, like you get along with everyone and fit in at the firm, then you are setting yourself up for extremely early burnout
Did they tell you at the beginning that everyone would receive offers or that not everyone would? Did they equivocate at all (e.g., “generally, everyone gets an offer”)? Or did they not bring offer prospects up at all? Recruiting told us "not to worry" at the beginning of the summer, but historically the firm has no-offered one or two summers each year. Thankfully, this year everyone got an offer.
What kind of events did they put on? Summer lunches were a big deal in New York. We usually had one big event every week, and the junior associates are given quite a budget to put on a hell of a show one night in the second half of the summer.
3. What was the outcome of the SA?
Did you get an offer? Yes.
Did anyone in you Summer Class get no-offered? No.
Did you (or do you plan to) return to the firm as an Associate? Yes, I'll be returning as a full-time associate.


Hey! Can you please PM me?

Anonymous User
Posts: 273411
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Sep 17, 2016 11:05 am

BASIC INFORMATION
1. What market did you work in (e.g., New York City, Atlanta, Charlotte, the Midwest, etc.)? Ravenous Pits of Maelbolg, 8th Circle (but split time with DC satellite office)
2. What kind of firm was it (e.g., BigLaw, MidLaw, SmallLaw, etc.)? BigLaw - the firm is present in every market, in the darkest depths of each man's heart, waiting only to be freed. Branches in NY, DC, and SF are particularly thriving.
3. What year did you do your SA? Was it a 1L SA or a 2L SA? Time is meaningless here. I was a 2L when I started but I truly don't know what I am anymore, nor even that I am
4. What was the firm or firm-range (e.g., DLA Piper, V30, V50-60, etc.)? Don't want to out myself too much, but its peer firms are: Mammon, Azazel, and Epstein LLP; Abaddon Megido LLP, and Schulte Roth
5. What sort of work did you do (e.g., all litigation, mostly corporate, securities, etc.)? Transactional (Eternal Soul Assignments/Collections, Faustian Bargain Contract Drafting, Private Equity deals
6. Around how many people were in your Summer Class (e.g., 100+, <10, 30-40ish, etc.; but consider not answering if you were in a market small enough for this to potentially be outing)? We never looked far beyond the summers chained to either side of us, but from one brief glance as our galleon docked upon the blasphemous forgotten shore to unload us upon our new masters, I saw listless rows upon rows of the blank of mind and dead of eye, soul already departed from the husk still present. So I would guess around 60-70

CONTENT
1. What kind of assignments did you get? There were no written assignments, no central planning, no free market. Sitting at my desk, the suggestion would come quietly, as though whispered from afar. I would know what to do when They asked, the hooded associates told me as I was led to my office. I could never remember just what I did; my mind would not let me recall as if it instantly scabbed over the memory. When my task was finished I would just know, and come to. I always was sitting back at my desk at such times of completion, with only the teasing mental fragments (memory or imagination, I cannot say) suggesting I had recently been deep in snow or in a strange room, covered in blood.

Do you have any tips for doing well on the assignments you mentioned? We were given no feedback on our performance, but I heard whispers that some summers who resisted timely completion of their duties were relocated to the Benighted Lair of the Endsong, where the contract attorneys are normally kept. Those who kept their head down seemed to survive the summer mostly intact and Unchanged.

2. Was it a “working summer” or a more of a “party summer?” Despite the expectation that we would be working full days, the firm did make efforts to provide plenty of after-hours events. When the sun retreated, under strange stars and unknown constellations we would align in formations in a nearby field, dictated by the hooded associates who directed us. Shadows writhed at the corners of our vision, and a discordant drum beat rang out. "They feed and are fed" was the only explanation we got about where the partners were or what the purpose of the events were, and upon further pressing were only told theat their hungers are not of our ability to know or comprehend. Afterwards, hors d'ouvres and drinks were served - open bar!

3. What was the outcome of the SA? No formal offers are given, but as I sit in my final year of Law School, I know embedded in my soul is the knowledge of how and when to return. Some from the year ahead of me tried to escape the Call, fleeing to as far-flung a place as they could find on this plane, but their reward was madness to the point of idiocy. When the time is right, I shall return, pending bar results.

4. Is there any other information you think those looking to learn what to expect during an SA might find helpful? The Gatekeeper can free you but you can never truly be free. If you can make him shed a tear, by story or song, he will grant you passage from the firm, but few have succeeded. Be warned.

User avatar
GoogleWasMyIdea
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2015 3:47 pm

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby GoogleWasMyIdea » Sat Sep 17, 2016 12:21 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I summered in Los Angeles last summer (2015) at a roughly 80-100 attorney office (think White & Case, Winston & Strawn, Milbank, Perkins Coie, etc.). My summer was very laid back, fun, yet substantive. Summer associates were given assignments that normal first-years were given and worked directly with partners, senior associates, and midlevel/juniors. The culture was absolutely awesome...way better than I anticipated and the associates were a tight knit group (read: a lot of drinking). We had firm-sponsored events every week, sometimes two in a week, and they were incredible. The firm definitely spared no expense and it was great to see a lot of associates and even partners show up at most of the events. We also went to impromptu happy hours usually a couple times a week, which the firm would pick up the tab.

I rotated through a few different practice groups, and all groups were very busy, which was nice. Since the firm was busy we were thrown onto deal teams and immediately were sitting in on client conference calls, reading over purchase agreements, drafting ancillary documents, etc. I did way more substantive work than anticipated, and partners and associates took the time out of their days to go over the assignments with you to give you feedback, which consisted of both praise and constructive tips.

I think the latest I ever stayed at the office was about 6:30, and most days I was out by 5:30. Depending on which rotation I was in, the days started at different times. For instance, one practice group started right at 9 every morning, whereas another started around 9:45/10am. Coffee runs were plentiful, I didn't pay for a single lunch the entire summer (associates were always willing to go to lunch with summers for free lunch), and the firm often had smoothie bars, gelato bars, and make your own waffle/bonsai bowls over the course of the summer. There's no way leaving at 5:30 everyday was an accurate representation of being an actual associate, as I know associates were often working later than that (I was on a lot of deal emails and getting emails until 8 or 9pm some nights), but associates were forthcoming in letting us know that there was absolutely no facetime requirement and most evening work was done from home.

Turnover at my particular firm is very low by biglaw standards, and the firm doesn't seem to push anyone out, which was nice to know (not that I intend to stay forever). There were a few super-associates (8-10 years) and a few special counsel, but everyone seemed pretty job-secure. Overall it was a great summer and I really love my firm. Happy to answer answer any questions via PM -- if you're interested, let me know and I'll PM you.


Hi! Can you please pm me?

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KunAgnis
Posts: 136
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:41 pm

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby KunAgnis » Sat Sep 17, 2016 1:48 pm

Anonymous User wrote:BASIC INFORMATION
1. What market did you work in (e.g., New York City, Atlanta, Charlotte, the Midwest, etc.)? Ravenous Pits of Maelbolg, 8th Circle (but split time with DC satellite office)
2. What kind of firm was it (e.g., BigLaw, MidLaw, SmallLaw, etc.)? BigLaw - the firm is present in every market, in the darkest depths of each man's heart, waiting only to be freed. Branches in NY, DC, and SF are particularly thriving.
3. What year did you do your SA? Was it a 1L SA or a 2L SA? Time is meaningless here. I was a 2L when I started but I truly don't know what I am anymore, nor even that I am
4. What was the firm or firm-range (e.g., DLA Piper, V30, V50-60, etc.)? Don't want to out myself too much, but its peer firms are: Mammon, Azazel, and Epstein LLP; Abaddon Megido LLP, and Schulte Roth
5. What sort of work did you do (e.g., all litigation, mostly corporate, securities, etc.)? Transactional (Eternal Soul Assignments/Collections, Faustian Bargain Contract Drafting, Private Equity deals
6. Around how many people were in your Summer Class (e.g., 100+, <10, 30-40ish, etc.; but consider not answering if you were in a market small enough for this to potentially be outing)? We never looked far beyond the summers chained to either side of us, but from one brief glance as our galleon docked upon the blasphemous forgotten shore to unload us upon our new masters, I saw listless rows upon rows of the blank of mind and dead of eye, soul already departed from the husk still present. So I would guess around 60-70

CONTENT
1. What kind of assignments did you get? There were no written assignments, no central planning, no free market. Sitting at my desk, the suggestion would come quietly, as though whispered from afar. I would know what to do when They asked, the hooded associates told me as I was led to my office. I could never remember just what I did; my mind would not let me recall as if it instantly scabbed over the memory. When my task was finished I would just know, and come to. I always was sitting back at my desk at such times of completion, with only the teasing mental fragments (memory or imagination, I cannot say) suggesting I had recently been deep in snow or in a strange room, covered in blood.

Do you have any tips for doing well on the assignments you mentioned? We were given no feedback on our performance, but I heard whispers that some summers who resisted timely completion of their duties were relocated to the Benighted Lair of the Endsong, where the contract attorneys are normally kept. Those who kept their head down seemed to survive the summer mostly intact and Unchanged.

2. Was it a “working summer” or a more of a “party summer?” Despite the expectation that we would be working full days, the firm did make efforts to provide plenty of after-hours events. When the sun retreated, under strange stars and unknown constellations we would align in formations in a nearby field, dictated by the hooded associates who directed us. Shadows writhed at the corners of our vision, and a discordant drum beat rang out. "They feed and are fed" was the only explanation we got about where the partners were or what the purpose of the events were, and upon further pressing were only told theat their hungers are not of our ability to know or comprehend. Afterwards, hors d'ouvres and drinks were served - open bar!

3. What was the outcome of the SA? No formal offers are given, but as I sit in my final year of Law School, I know embedded in my soul is the knowledge of how and when to return. Some from the year ahead of me tried to escape the Call, fleeing to as far-flung a place as they could find on this plane, but their reward was madness to the point of idiocy. When the time is right, I shall return, pending bar results.

4. Is there any other information you think those looking to learn what to expect during an SA might find helpful? The Gatekeeper can free you but you can never truly be free. If you can make him shed a tear, by story or song, he will grant you passage from the firm, but few have succeeded. Be warned.


Sounds like you have too much time on your hands

Anonymous User
Posts: 273411
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: ITT: Describe your SA

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:24 pm

BASIC INFORMATION
1. What market did you work in (e.g., New York City, Atlanta, Charlotte, the Midwest, etc.)? DC
2. What kind of firm was it (e.g., BigLaw, MidLaw, SmallLaw, etc.)? BigLaw
3. What year did you do your SA? Was it a 1L SA or a 2L SA? 2L SA
4. What was the firm or firm-range (e.g., DLA Piper, V30, V50-60, etc.)? something something V50
5. What sort of work did you do (e.g., all litigation, mostly corporate, securities, etc.)? Bit of everything. Mostly lit/regulatory, but some corporate peppered in.
6. Around how many people were in your Summer Class (e.g., 100+, <10, 30-40ish, etc.; but consider not answering if you were in a market small enough for this to potentially be outing)? Large for DC, > 20 SAs.

CONTENT
1. What kind of assignments did you get? Wide range of assignments; we had an assignment system but quite a bit of flexibility in going outside of the system/selecting assignments in different departments. I did a few memos, some more informal legal research, and some client development stuff. Very research/writing intensive. It definitely felt like substantive assignments rather than make-believe work.

With respect to doing well on assignments, I would say the best piece of advice is the usual cliche: double(triple)-check your work before handing in assignments. Proofread like crazy. I didn't really get any substantive feedback, but I know of other summers that were told to be more careful with their work after giving in assignments that were perceived as "sloppy." Substantively, much of what I did is just application of legal research & writing skills learned in LS, so the advice is to just use the research methods you've already learned and not panic, even if you don't initially know the area of law you're researching.

2. Was it a “working summer” or a more of a “party summer?” Overall more of a party summer, but not by much. Not really a work summer because work wasn't emphasized as essential, but at the same time the partying side wasn't outrageous (imo, an agreeable surprise). We had at least event a week, but it wasn't the boozefest I was expecting and you weren't required to attend. Some summers missed "big" events and it was nbd. We also didn't have lunches pushed on us every day of the week, which was nice. I guess the best way to put it was that if you wanted to work more, you could, but at the same time the social side was there too. It was a good balance.

We were told at the beginning of the summer that the offer was ours to lose. As with many "100%" firms, my firm no-offers a summer or two every now and then, so it very much felt like a 12-week interview. Whether on work assignments or at social events (what you'd usually expect - lunches, receptions, happy hours, etc.) it was pretty clear that we were being constantly evaluated.


3. What was the outcome of the SA? Offers for everyone. Probably will be coming back.

4. Is there any other information you think those looking to learn what to expect during an SA might find helpful? It's a little year for this year's batch of summers, but I would say that it's definitely true that different firms value work/social events differently. Some of my friends in New York didn't see the light of day very often because they were chained to their desk. Some of my other friends were out partying until 2 AM on a regular basis. It's hard to figure out which firm does what, but it's worth it to do the research.




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