Waiving into the DC Bar?

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Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 30, 2015 1:54 pm

I was told that there was only a two year window to use an MBE score to waive into the DC Bar without examination. I do not see anything regarding that on the DC Bar website. Can anyone provide more information regarding the requirements (I also see that a person can waive in after 5 years of practice)? Any pros/cons to being a member of the DC Bar that might be less than obvious?


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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 30, 2015 4:19 pm

Its kind of cool how they accept MBE scores from FAILED exams. Most states don't do that.
But I feel bad for anyone that transfers in the minimum 133 MBE, that would make it SUPER hard with a TON of pressure of getting near perfect essay scores. I wouldn't do that unless I had at least a 150. Otherwise I'd just retake the MBE there too.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 30, 2015 4:20 pm

I'm not seeing a time limitation on the MBE score.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 30, 2015 4:22 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Its kind of cool how they accept MBE scores from FAILED exams. Most states don't do that.
But I feel bad for anyone that transfers in the minimum 133 MBE, that would make it SUPER hard with a TON of pressure of getting near perfect essay scores. I wouldn't do that unless I had at least a 150. Otherwise I'd just retake the MBE there too.



Which states do that? I thought for DC you can just waive in assuming you passed an exam as a whole and your MBE score was over a 133.

hiima3L
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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby hiima3L » Fri Jan 30, 2015 9:32 pm

I've never heard of that DC bar time limit. From everyone I've talked to, I've heard there is 0 reason to waive into the DC bar unless you have to. It costs upward of $1k and there are no real benefits.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Desert Fox » Fri Jan 30, 2015 9:36 pm

hiima3L wrote:I've never heard of that DC bar time limit. From everyone I've talked to, I've heard there is 0 reason to waive into the DC bar unless you have to. It costs upward of $1k and there are no real benefits.


1,000 dollars and its takes a fucking year.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 30, 2015 9:36 pm

There are TWO SEPERATE conversations going on at the same time here.

Conversation 1: If you PASSED the bar in your home state and "waive" in as a passer (no time limit)

Conversation2: If you FAILED the bar in your home state and had an MBE above 133 you can transfer in your MBE score but have to get a COMBINED passing score on the MBE and essays that you have to take in DC (you just don't have to retake MBE there)

For the 2nd one, I heard once they let you go as far as 5 years post exam, but most states that allow it only allow it for 2-3 years. Some require it be the very next exam (which would mean putting in the transfer papers the exact same day you get the results basically to meet the deadlines)

Contact DC by email or phone to be sure, but if your MBE was a recent one, your good.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby XxSpyKEx » Fri Jan 30, 2015 11:56 pm

hiima3L wrote:I've never heard of that DC bar time limit. From everyone I've talked to, I've heard there is 0 reason to waive into the DC bar unless you have to. It costs upward of $1k and there are no real benefits.


Yup. Not to mention you can practice law in DC without being licensed under the supervision of another attorney, who is licensed in DC, for basically the time period it takes to waive in. So, in other words, the system is set-up so that you are at no disadvantage in terms of the vast majority of legal hiring that takes place in DC, where you can get a job before you even bother to apply to the DC bar (and employers, for the most part, have no reason to pick someone else over you, since you can immediately practice in DC without even being licensed).

EDIT- You might be thinking of Minnesota re: the time limit.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby theman » Sat Jan 31, 2015 12:04 am

XxSpyKEx wrote:
hiima3L wrote:I've never heard of that DC bar time limit. From everyone I've talked to, I've heard there is 0 reason to waive into the DC bar unless you have to. It costs upward of $1k and there are no real benefits.


Yup. Not to mention you can practice law in DC without being licensed under the supervision of another attorney, who is licensed in DC, for basically the time period it takes to waive in. So, in other words, the system is set-up so that you are at no disadvantage in terms of the vast majority of legal hiring that takes place in DC, where you can get a job before you even bother to apply to the DC bar (and employers, for the most part, have no reason to pick someone else over you, since you can immediately practice in DC without even being licensed).

EDIT- You might be thinking of Minnesota re: the time limit.

How does no else see that he is talking about (and only about) an MBE SCORE???

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby XxSpyKEx » Sat Jan 31, 2015 2:50 pm

theman wrote:
XxSpyKEx wrote:
hiima3L wrote:I've never heard of that DC bar time limit. From everyone I've talked to, I've heard there is 0 reason to waive into the DC bar unless you have to. It costs upward of $1k and there are no real benefits.


Yup. Not to mention you can practice law in DC without being licensed under the supervision of another attorney, who is licensed in DC, for basically the time period it takes to waive in. So, in other words, the system is set-up so that you are at no disadvantage in terms of the vast majority of legal hiring that takes place in DC, where you can get a job before you even bother to apply to the DC bar (and employers, for the most part, have no reason to pick someone else over you, since you can immediately practice in DC without even being licensed).

EDIT- You might be thinking of Minnesota re: the time limit.

How does no else see that he is talking about (and only about) an MBE SCORE???


In DC you can waive into the DC bar with a passing bar exam from another state in which you received a 133 or higher on the MBE. He is talking about "waiving into the DC bar without examination" by using his MBE score:

Anonymous User wrote:I was told that there was only a two year window to use an MBE score to waive into the DC Bar without examination. I do not see anything regarding that on the DC Bar website. Can anyone provide more information regarding the requirements (I also see that a person can waive in after 5 years of practice)? Any pros/cons to being a member of the DC Bar that might be less than obvious?


The point is that there is no time limit to waive into the DC bar by using your passing exam from another state in which you received a 133 or higher MBE score and that there is no reason to waive into DC unless you actually have a job offer in DC that you intend to accept.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby misterjames » Sat Jan 31, 2015 2:58 pm

is it difficult to get a 133 on the MBE? i'm not well informed on bar scores. is that a high score?

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby XxSpyKEx » Sat Jan 31, 2015 7:47 pm

misterjames wrote:is it difficult to get a 133 on the MBE? i'm not well informed on bar scores. is that a high score?


It's actually a really low MBE score. It'd be really difficult to pass a bar with less than a 133 MBE score (you'd need extremely high scores on the essays).

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Feb 01, 2015 9:41 am

In the same vein, assuming someone is admitted to a jurisdiction that does not have reciprocity with other states, say Florida, could one become admitted in DC and then use it to waive in to other states? Has anyone ever done that? Success stories?

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Aeon » Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:05 pm

Anonymous User wrote:In the same vein, assuming someone is admitted to a jurisdiction that does not have reciprocity with other states, say Florida, could one become admitted in DC and then use it to waive in to other states? Has anyone ever done that? Success stories?


It depends on the state. Some states will allow you to be admitted on motion after a certain number of years (usually five, but it varies) regardless of reciprocity. Others allow admission on motion after you've practiced law for a certain number of years, provided that you are licensed in a reciprocal jurisdiction. Still others will admit you on motion only if you have practiced for a certain number of years in a reciprocal jurisdiction. Some states don't allow admission on motion at all.

So, yes, you could use DC's generous reciprocity to get admitted on motion to states that are reciprocal with DC but not Florida, but it would require you to have practiced law for a number of years after admission. Not to mention the cost and time (could take close to a year) to waive in to DC.

See the NCBE guide to bar admission requirements for more detailed state-by-state information.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Feb 01, 2015 12:12 pm

Anonymous User wrote:In the same vein, assuming someone is admitted to a jurisdiction that does not have reciprocity with other states, say Florida, could one become admitted in DC and then use it to waive in to other states? Has anyone ever done that? Success stories?


Yes. This is a well known back door to reciprocity for those with the California bar. Not sure about other states, but with the CalBar you can waive into DC and after five years of practice waive in to just about any state with reciprocity. Note that it does not work the other way around.

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Re: Waiving into the DC Bar?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Jun 08, 2015 11:09 am

Is it possible for one to waive into the DC bar, having passed the NJ/NJ bars, but without the 133 MBE score?
would I need to retake the MBE?




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