From Law to Teaching

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ballcaps
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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby ballcaps » Sun Feb 22, 2015 2:53 pm

swadianfc wrote:Out of curiosity, why not look for a job in Westchester or Nassau? Better payscales and benefits.

true dat. i guess because i want to live in the city, and because the pay there, while better, still can't touch the biglaw market.


Anonymous User wrote:Do you want to go into education law/policy?

don't think so, but don't have much direction yet.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Feb 22, 2015 3:34 pm

are foreign language teachers in demand? (specifically, Spanish) I'm torn between that and special ed.

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chem!
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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby chem! » Sun Feb 22, 2015 4:20 pm

Anonymous User wrote:are foreign language teachers in demand? (specifically, Spanish) I'm torn between that and special ed.

Special Ed is in higher demand, at least in Texas. If you can dual-certify, you will create more opportunities for yourself, as well. The subject-area demand really varies on location.

Here's a link to the Dept. of Education's document listing of nationwide teacher shortage areas.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Feb 22, 2015 8:25 pm

chem! wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:are foreign language teachers in demand? (specifically, Spanish) I'm torn between that and special ed.

Special Ed is in higher demand, at least in Texas. If you can dual-certify, you will create more opportunities for yourself, as well. The subject-area demand really varies on location.

Here's a link to the Dept. of Education's document listing of nationwide teacher shortage areas.



Thanks, that link is helpful. Good to know that both Spanish and special ed are both in demand in my state.

Is the JD a plus for social service/social work type jobs?

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BlueLotus
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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby BlueLotus » Sun Feb 22, 2015 8:57 pm

Should I leave off my JD when applying to jerbs like this one:
http://webgui.phila.k12.pa.us/offices/e ... C8p-TbTs5A

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chem!
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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby chem! » Sun Feb 22, 2015 9:33 pm

I don't think a JD is going to be a problem if you want to transition into a career as an educator, especially with a PI background/interest. Obviously, the concern is going to be that you don't want interviewers to think that you will bail on teaching if you get a legal job. It's going to be on you to demonstrate that this is a legitimate interest and that you intend to follow through, at least long enough to get through an entire school year.

I also think that a classroom assistant would be a good place to start, especially if you are considering special ed, because it will give you a first-hand look at what that job entails without you having the primary responsibility for the students.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby BlueLotus » Sun Feb 22, 2015 9:41 pm

chem! wrote:I don't think a JD is going to be a problem if you want to transition into a career as an educator, especially with a PI background/interest. Obviously, the concern is going to be that you don't want interviewers to think that you will bail on teaching if you get a legal job. It's going to be on you to demonstrate that this is a legitimate interest and that you intend to follow through, at least long enough to get through an entire school year.

I also think that a classroom assistant would be a good place to start, especially if you are considering special ed, because it will give you a first-hand look at what that job entails without you having the primary responsibility for the students.


Hi chem!, yes I do have a strong PI focused resume; all of my legal positions have dealt with indigent populations and underserved communities.

To show my unwavering commitment to K-12 teaching, would it be a good idea to start out as a special ed classroom assistant (like that job I just posted above in Philly) do that for 2-3 years, and then apply to a teaching certification program?

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chem!
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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby chem! » Sun Feb 22, 2015 9:48 pm

I think a year as an assistant would be totally enough. Honestly, in some high-need areas, it wouldn't even be necessary. I just recommended it b/c SpEd can be really challenging, depending on the level of student you are dealing with and your own personal makeup.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby BlueLotus » Mon Feb 23, 2015 9:56 am

chem!, when you were applying to K-12 teaching jerbs, how did schools look at your legal education/experience? Was it a plus or just a neutral?

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby chem! » Mon Feb 23, 2015 3:03 pm

BlueLotus wrote:chem!, when you were applying to K-12 teaching jerbs, how did schools look at your legal education/experience? Was it a plus or just a neutral?

PM'd.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Feb 23, 2015 7:04 pm

Is a JD a plus for teacher assistant/teaching aide jobs?

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby ballcaps » Mon Feb 23, 2015 7:58 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Is a JD a plus for teacher assistant/teaching aide jobs?


doesn't matter, you barely need a college degree.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby chem! » Mon Feb 23, 2015 8:18 pm

In all honesty, I think a JD will be viewed neutrally in any school-based education position. JMO and based on my years in public education in Texas.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby stoopkid13 » Mon Feb 23, 2015 8:41 pm

Regarding timeline and certification, every district is different. I teach in Nevada right now and you have a three year (it might be two now) window to meet all of your testing/course/evaluation requirements for Alternative Route Licensure (teaching without a background in education). That's a long time and many ARL teachers will leave before that three year window expires. Is it a hard deadline? Yes. Does it really matter? No not really because people who want to teach have no problem finishing and people who don't want to teach leave before it closes. I can't speak for other districts or states. Based on my (limited) experience, I would not worry about getting certified; I don't think certification processes are a real barrier to employment. Worst case scenario you can try and long-term sub (which some use as a way of figuring out if they want to teach). I also think the JD would be viewed neutrally in the hiring process, possibly excepting private schools, which don't need to worry about certification and basically exist in their own dimension.

Regarding TFA (I'm in my second year), I would be careful applying if you have geographic commitments. When applying, you have little say in what region you will be placed in. Also, every TFA region operates a little differently (and talking to managers, I think this is will only become truer in the future). TFA is basically a franchise; it's up to each region to figure out how to manage its teachers, collect data, provide training and coaching, etc. Each region is also different due to partnerships with school districts. In some regions, TFAs are placed sporadically across several schools; sometimes they are clustered in a few schools. Some regions require two years of Masters classes; other regions only require one year. I will echo another poster: TFA is trying to focus more on career changers and less on recent college grads.

If you want to teach abroad, I'm sure there are several programs that will allow you to teach English overseas. The only one I am familiar with is the Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Grant. There's also EPIK (English Program in Korea) and JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching). Not sure how a JD would affect admissions but it might be worth taking a look.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Feb 23, 2015 9:11 pm

stoopkid13 wrote:Regarding timeline and certification, every district is different. I teach in Nevada right now and you have a three year (it might be two now) window to meet all of your testing/course/evaluation requirements for Alternative Route Licensure (teaching without a background in education). That's a long time and many ARL teachers will leave before that three year window expires. Is it a hard deadline? Yes. Does it really matter? No not really because people who want to teach have no problem finishing and people who don't want to teach leave before it closes. I can't speak for other districts or states. Based on my (limited) experience, I would not worry about getting certified; I don't think certification processes are a real barrier to employment. Worst case scenario you can try and long-term sub (which some use as a way of figuring out if they want to teach). I also think the JD would be viewed neutrally in the hiring process, possibly excepting private schools, which don't need to worry about certification and basically exist in their own dimension.

Regarding TFA (I'm in my second year), I would be careful applying if you have geographic commitments. When applying, you have little say in what region you will be placed in. Also, every TFA region operates a little differently (and talking to managers, I think this is will only become truer in the future). TFA is basically a franchise; it's up to each region to figure out how to manage its teachers, collect data, provide training and coaching, etc. Each region is also different due to partnerships with school districts. In some regions, TFAs are placed sporadically across several schools; sometimes they are clustered in a few schools. Some regions require two years of Masters classes; other regions only require one year. I will echo another poster: TFA is trying to focus more on career changers and less on recent college grads.

If you want to teach abroad, I'm sure there are several programs that will allow you to teach English overseas. The only one I am familiar with is the Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Grant. There's also EPIK (English Program in Korea) and JET (Japan Exchange and Teaching). Not sure how a JD would affect admissions but it might be worth taking a look.


Will TFA care about my shitty lawl school grades? (3.006, bottom 10-15%)

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby ballcaps » Mon Feb 23, 2015 9:23 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Will TFA care about my shitty lawl school grades? (3.006, bottom 10-15%)


not sure. their #1 concern is finding basically competent people who won't quit. to this end they look for people who are high-achieving and demonstrably interested in education.

for any such position, especially following a disappointing foray in law, you should emphasize your motivation and passion to teach (even if it's, er, newfound.)

fyi: statistically, TFA is harder to get than HLS. of course you should apply if you're interested, but no one should count on it.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:06 am

ballcaps wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Will TFA care about my shitty lawl school grades? (3.006, bottom 10-15%)


not sure. their #1 concern is finding basically competent people who won't quit. to this end they look for people who are high-achieving and demonstrably interested in education.

for any such position, especially following a disappointing foray in law, you should emphasize your motivation and passion to teach (even if it's, er, newfound.)

fyi: statistically, TFA is harder to get than HLS. of course you should apply if you're interested, but no one should count on it.


How about joint teacher certification/M.Ed. programs? Will they look askance at my 3.006?

Also, how are M.Ed. programs in terms of rigor? I obviously didn't do so hot in lawl school, but I did well in UG (3.8+, magna, Phi beta kappa)

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:08 am

ballcaps wrote:grades don't matter whatsoever, and m.ed./m.a.t. programs are among the easiest graduate programs that exist.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:18 am

A. Nony Mouse wrote:
ballcaps wrote:grades don't matter whatsoever, and m.ed./m.a.t. programs are among the easiest graduate programs that exist.



How about MSW programs? Are they graded on a forced curve like lawl school?

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Kinky John » Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:33 am

stoopkid13 wrote:Regarding timeline and certification, every district is different. I teach in Nevada right now and you have a three year (it might be two now) window to meet all of your testing/course/evaluation requirements for Alternative Route Licensure (teaching without a background in education). That's a long time and many ARL teachers will leave before that three year window expires. Is it a hard deadline? Yes. Does it really matter? No not really because people who want to teach have no problem finishing and people who don't want to teach leave before it closes. I can't speak for other districts or states. Based on my (limited) experience, I would not worry about getting certified; I don't think certification processes are a real barrier to employment. Worst case scenario you can try and long-term sub (which some use as a way of figuring out if they want to teach). I also think the JD would be viewed neutrally in the hiring process, possibly excepting private schools, which don't need to worry about certification and basically exist in their own dimension.


I suppose it's a bit obvious and redundant, but my point is that you have to look into each individual teacher training program/alternate route certification program and check out their requirements as they vary from city to city, state to state. It's not so much worrying about it as it is knowing what you need to complete (however insignificant) before you can get into the classroom.

Again ymmv but from my experience some schools (typically those where hiring is competitive) don't like hiring inexperienced teachers with advanced degrees. So if you're interested in teaching in a high-need area, +1 to it being neutral.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Tue Feb 24, 2015 11:36 am

Anonymous User wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:
ballcaps wrote:grades don't matter whatsoever, and m.ed./m.a.t. programs are among the easiest graduate programs that exist.



How about MSW programs? Are they graded on a forced curve like lawl school?

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Are MSW programs graded on a forced curve like lawl school?


No, there's rampant grade inflation like most master's programs. Grades don't really matter for social work hiring though.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby ballcaps » Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:11 pm

A. Nony Mouse wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:
ballcaps wrote:grades don't matter whatsoever, and m.ed./m.a.t. programs are among the easiest graduate programs that exist.



How about MSW programs? Are they graded on a forced curve like lawl school?

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Are MSW programs graded on a forced curve like lawl school?


No, there's rampant grade inflation like most master's programs. Grades don't really matter for social work hiring though.


lol

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Feb 24, 2015 7:12 pm

Should I leave the JD off my resume when applying to TA positions?

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Feb 25, 2015 2:49 pm

Between social work and teaching, which is less glutted? Which is more likely to lead to a FTLT jerb? I need to figure out a plan if my C&F sh*t doesn't work out.

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Re: From Law to Teaching

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Feb 25, 2015 6:05 pm

When it comes to getting teacher jobs, does the ranking of your UG/M.Ed./M.A.T. program matter? Do your jobs prospects differ depending on where you go to school?




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