McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

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JimR
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McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby JimR » Fri Aug 30, 2013 9:27 pm

I would like your thoughts on this. Both are still in flux but let's just assume the choices are on the table for now. Some background: T14 grad, passed McKinsey IWIA (relatively recent grads go through the same IWIA process as current JD students) and now invited to a second round, already working as a lawyer, and a "much better" V100 satellite office (with 100+ attorneys so not DLA Turkmenistan) seems interested in hiring as a lateral. The V100 is yet to invite to a "callback" but looks like pretty much a sure thing for at least another round of interviews. I highlight that I am already a working lawyer at an AmLaw 200 firm but this thread should be of use to 2Ls and even 3Ls out there. I won't provide any more specifics than this but I can provide more details if you would like, within the bounds that I have set. I hope you will see that the specifics I provide is pretty narrow as is.

I have limited time to prepare for McKinsey second rounds. They need tons of practice. Realistically, both opportunities probably won't pan out. I'm interested in finding out what the crowd thinks, though.

Imagine you are in a position where you've practiced in a run of the mill, old AmLaw 200 biglaw with institutional clients. Now you have an offer at a "better" biglaw firm within your practice area but you also have a McKinsey offer, where you start as an entry level "Associate." All of this in NYC/Boston/DC/Philly. Assume you already know you don't have what it takes to make a partner. For the law students lurking here, making partner requires not only grit, intelligence, luck and sheer determination but also sacrificing a lot of "life" in the mythical "work-life balance" equation. Some people make it, many don't. No judgment either way.

What would you do? What do you think you should do? McKinsey offers a pretty good "exit opportunities." But then McKinsey Associates last 18 months at most and get middle management in the middle of nowhere as exit options (although one's pretty much guaranteed a job out of McKinsey). V100 Biglaw satellite has pretty well known partners and will provide gazillion options to develop your skills as a lawyer, setting you up to be at the least a pretty run of the mill in-house attorney down the road (akin to middle management at XYZ company out of McKinsey). The upsides for both positions are excellent but 1% make it there, or thereabouts. The downside really boils down to whether you want to be a middle management lawyer or a middle management business/strategy guy. Frankly, I don't know whether I want to be a lawyer the rest of my life or even 3-4 years on out. I do like it right now, though, and I am pretty good at what I do.

TLDNR: McKinsey Associate vs. V100 junior associate - what would you choose? I invite 0Ls to 3Ls, post-grads (whether employed or not), working attorneys, working non-attorneys with JDs, non-working JDs, trolls, goblins, fairy godmothers, any and all out of the woods. Any insight would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 4:00 am

McK is way >>> than V100. McK is akin to V10 or V5 exits dude...

Also, IWIA is really easy to pass. What I'm trying to say is that you should work real hard to get the job; second round cuts are brutal, and final round is incredibly difficult to get through. When I interviewed, I think ~80-90% got pass the IWIA first round, ~15% got pass second round, and Maybe 10% of those got offers after final round.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 7:39 am

you should go ask somewhere else. most people on here won't know what the fuck they're talking about. of course that won't stop them from offering their opinion anyways. the exit options from law are overblown, in my opinion. people exit from so-called prestigious firms into shit law or fall off the grid all the time. there are a lot of variables involved that have little to do with V ranking.

with regards to your question, i think you should ask this when you get a McKinsey offer. the next round is where the real cutting begins.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby $$$$$$ » Sat Aug 31, 2013 7:47 am

McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 11:38 am

$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


Neither McK nor V10 are better per se. They suit very different sets of people. For McK, you have to be comfortable traveling every week, since every office has global staffing. Also, at McK, they make rigorous cuts every two years, while in BigLaw you can cruise through and become a senior associate if you really want it.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 11:43 am

As someone who has had to make a similar choice (MBB v. V25) and worked with a team of former MBB consultants prior to law school, I'm going to push back on the others a little bit. The McKinsey "exit options" are insanely overstated. Exits to cushy PE/IM/HF jobs are pretty rare (although a little more common from Bain I've been told). Like you said, most people exit to an industry middle management job making about what a first-year associate makes at a vault firm.

Also, if you are hired as an associate (a post-MBA level position) at McKinsey I am not sure why the hell you would go back to business school like a poster above me suggested.

Ultimately, this is purely a preference choice. Do you want to on the business side or legal side and would you rather deal with traveling hard throughout the week or being on call throughout the weekend but staying local.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 12:03 pm

Anonymous User wrote:As someone who has had to make a similar choice (MBB v. V25) and worked with a team of former MBB consultants prior to law school, I'm going to push back on the others a little bit. The McKinsey "exit options" are insanely overstated. Exits to cushy PE/IM/HF jobs are pretty rare (although a little more common from Bain I've been told). Like you said, most people exit to an industry middle management job making about what a first-year associate makes at a vault firm.

Also, if you are hired as an associate (a post-MBA level position) at McKinsey I am not sure why the hell you would go back to business school like a poster above me suggested.

Ultimately, this is purely a preference choice. Do you want to on the business side or legal side and would you rather deal with traveling hard throughout the week or being on call throughout the weekend but staying local.


As a former consultant, albeit not McK, I agree. I would also add that the exit options are great for 1) analysts with great academic pedigrees (because of the institutionalized nature of PE recruiting), 2) senior rain-maker type employees. For everyone in between, it is highly dependent on project, connections, etc. McKinsey is an awesome brand name, but I wouldn't think that it is career transformative at the associate level.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby JimR » Sat Aug 31, 2013 2:54 pm

Thanks for the comments, everyone.

The gist of this thread is: should this fork in the road present itself to you, what would you personally do? And why? I need perspectives different than mine. Half-formed thoughts, rants, emoticons, memes, gifs etc. are also welcome.

One comment about IWIA so that others reading this thread can benefit - around 40% from my group passed on to the second round so it is not as easy as someone mentioned above. The other poster is right, around 50% make it past IWIA. Keep in mind that the IWIA I attended had mostly PhDs with hard science backgrounds, a couple of MD's, a couple of JD's. So McKPST needs preparation, especially if your math/logic skill is rusty (as was the case for me - I graduated from college and took the GRE/LSAT/GMAT etc. standardized tests like a gazillion years ago it seems - but it's very much doable as I am a living proof).

Second round is indeed where the culling happens. Honestly, I am not counting on getting past the hurdles @ McKinsey. That's why this thread. When you're billing 200+ hours a month in biglaw, you want to believe there are other things out there you could be doing. Traveling every week + a new "study" every couple of months or so (i.e. new client and location, new team, new problem) sounds really appealing at that point. So let me indulge.

About exit options. This is where I would love comments from those with actual knowledge (but armchair analysts are welcome to share their thoughts too). From what I know, McKinsey's options are broader but most don't end up at PE shops etc. More often than not, people either end up doing something innovative (think starting new ventures or joining such ventures) or going the middle-management route at some pretty good/F500 companies or at positions a bit higher up but at smaller shops in the middle of nowhere. Obviously, V100's options are narrower but pretty decent in-house options (I'm a corp guy, btw, so lit might be different) is open after 4-5 years, although these won't be any better than exit options out of McKinsey as an Associate. Personally, at this point I don't know if I want to keep being a lawyer the rest of my life, although the V100 route seems enticing right now.

But like I mentioned above, I would like to hear different takes on this issue. Let's bring out divergent thoughts. What would be your personal decision and why?

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby JimR » Sat Aug 31, 2013 3:06 pm

Anonymous User wrote:As someone who has had to make a similar choice (MBB v. V25) and worked with a team of former MBB consultants prior to law school, I'm going to push back on the others a little bit. The McKinsey "exit options" are insanely overstated. Exits to cushy PE/IM/HF jobs are pretty rare (although a little more common from Bain I've been told). Like you said, most people exit to an industry middle management job making about what a first-year associate makes at a vault firm.

Also, if you are hired as an associate (a post-MBA level position) at McKinsey I am not sure why the hell you would go back to business school like a poster above me suggested.

Ultimately, this is purely a preference choice. Do you want to on the business side or legal side and would you rather deal with traveling hard throughout the week or being on call throughout the weekend but staying local.


Yep, analysis wise this is exactly where I am at right now. This is the essential question to answer. I'm a married guy (been married for a while) with many domestic and international trips under my belt and frankly won't mind getting out of town weekdays as long as weekends are kosher for the most part. I've found biglaw corp to be worse because even when there's diddly squat to do, you're always on call and have to be in the office, I've worked every weekend the past 5-6 weeks etc.

What did you end up doing? Do you mind explaining a bit as to why you chose what you chose?

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 3:48 pm

McK for me unless super high ranked V-firm.
First, I think their work is more interesting than the work of lawyers.
Second, McK exit options seem better. McK literally prides itself on its network of alumni, career services, what their associates went on to do, whereas I do not think most law firms do this.


The only reasons I might have against choosing McK is that
1) The door to McK remains open if you go to a law firm, whereas the door to a law firm does not remain open once you to to McK.
2) The travel can make it more difficult than biglaw to maintain/keep relationships.


PS: 2nd round is probably easier for OP than many other people. You probably have gathered enough experience to be able to provide good leadership/change/bla bla stories. I think this is where most people really lose on this game. I do not think that their math/logic problems are too difficult, particularly if you have scored high enough on their test, your SAT, and the LSAT to merit their consideration.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 4:01 pm

$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


I'm that above poster that said McK>>>V100. This person ($$$$$) has no idea what he's talking about and is really drinking the McK kool aid.

(1) I actually went through the full recruiting process
(2) no one calls it the "third round", and the % I told you above is from first-hand experience. Also, $$$$$$ can't do math. 80% x 15% x 10% = 1.2%, which is roughly 1 in 50.
(3) no one leaves mck and goes to b-school after being an associate. only analysts do that
(4) kkr/goldman exits are unheard of from mck (it's really rare). PE/VC is very hard to get because PE/VCs usually hire from banks.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 8:29 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


I'm that above poster that said McK>>>V100. This person ($$$$$) has no idea what he's talking about and is really drinking the McK kool aid.

(1) I actually went through the full recruiting process
(2) no one calls it the "third round", and the % I told you above is from first-hand experience. Also, $$$$$$ can't do math. 80% x 15% x 10% = 1.2%, which is roughly 1 in 50.
(3) no one leaves mck and goes to b-school after being an associate. only analysts do that
(4) kkr/goldman exits are unheard of from mck (it's really rare). PE/VC is very hard to get because PE/VCs usually hire from banks.


I think you are being a little bit rough on the previous poster for no real reason. During my interviews, they mentioned it as the "third round" so no need to get super-pedantic about. Also, maybe this was so more in the past, but my friend went from McK to PE. Sure, this is anecdotal evidence and maybe biased, but in his opinion, if you are on your 20's, McK is the best thing you could have on your resume.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Aug 31, 2013 8:47 pm

$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


This dude is clearly going to have neither option available.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 01, 2013 1:28 am

Anonymous User wrote:
$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


I'm that above poster that said McK>>>V100. This person ($$$$$) has no idea what he's talking about and is really drinking the McK kool aid.

(1) I actually went through the full recruiting process
(2) no one calls it the "third round", and the % I told you above is from first-hand experience. Also, $$$$$$ can't do math. 80% x 15% x 10% = 1.2%, which is roughly 1 in 50.
(3) no one leaves mck and goes to b-school after being an associate. only analysts do that
(4) kkr/goldman exits are unheard of from mck (it's really rare). PE/VC is very hard to get because PE/VCs usually hire from banks.


What if one wanted to work at McKinsey, and then go to I-banking? Then wouldn't it make sense to go the MBA route after being an associate?

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 01, 2013 1:30 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


I'm that above poster that said McK>>>V100. This person ($$$$$) has no idea what he's talking about and is really drinking the McK kool aid.

(1) I actually went through the full recruiting process
(2) no one calls it the "third round", and the % I told you above is from first-hand experience. Also, $$$$$$ can't do math. 80% x 15% x 10% = 1.2%, which is roughly 1 in 50.
(3) no one leaves mck and goes to b-school after being an associate. only analysts do that
(4) kkr/goldman exits are unheard of from mck (it's really rare). PE/VC is very hard to get because PE/VCs usually hire from banks.


I think you are being a little bit rough on the previous poster for no real reason. During my interviews, they mentioned it as the "third round" so no need to get super-pedantic about. Also, maybe this was so more in the past, but my friend went from McK to PE. Sure, this is anecdotal evidence and maybe biased, but in his opinion, if you are on your 20's, McK is the best thing you could have on your resume.


Really? The poster critiqued my comment for no apparent reason and is clearly uninformed on the subject, yet seeks to give advice. As for sounding pedantic, I'm sorry for appearing that way -- I hope my above rationale gives some color though. No joke, you're the first person in roughly 80 people I've spoken with who has referred to a consulting firm final round as the "third round."

With respect to my comment on exits, KKR/TPG just isn't an spot that McK feeds into. And this is largely because of the reason you mentioned -- those kinds of exits are a thing of the past, and those companies look for i-banking veterans. McK folks can get PE/VC, but I maintain once more that it's a much, much rarer thing these days.

So while it seems like I'm giving the poster a hard time, it's really because he/she speaks with very little knowledge about the company at all.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 01, 2013 1:39 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


I'm that above poster that said McK>>>V100. This person ($$$$$) has no idea what he's talking about and is really drinking the McK kool aid.

(1) I actually went through the full recruiting process
(2) no one calls it the "third round", and the % I told you above is from first-hand experience. Also, $$$$$$ can't do math. 80% x 15% x 10% = 1.2%, which is roughly 1 in 50.
(3) no one leaves mck and goes to b-school after being an associate. only analysts do that
(4) kkr/goldman exits are unheard of from mck (it's really rare). PE/VC is very hard to get because PE/VCs usually hire from banks.


What if one wanted to work at McKinsey, and then go to I-banking? Then wouldn't it make sense to go the MBA route after being an associate?

Post-McK folks don't really want to do i-banking as a career, and if they do, then they would take a management position via the networking they've done during the job. Typically, after McK, the finance-oriented folks will try to exit into VC/PE, and if not there, Corp. finance. I could be wrong, but it seems to me that the overwhelming view is that you should not be pursuing another degree after a JD.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 01, 2013 1:44 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
$$$$$$ wrote:McKinsey isn't just way better than V100, it is pretty much better than any legal option you could ever have, sans Wachtell or being the General Counsel of a Hedge Fund or Investment Bank. This is about your goals and what kind of person you are. Consulting can be just as brutal as law, but you will be presenting to clients a lot, traveling, learning about corporate strategy, etc.

In my opinion, McKinsey is the best place to work on the planet, given the range of opportunities that you have from there - you can go pretty much anywhere you want, no door is shut in any field (except maybe law - but not sure). The poster above made it sound WAY to easy to get McKinsey. Pretty much 1-in-50 first rounders will get an offer there and the pass rate for the first round is more like 50%. But the second round is a brutal jump, and most never see the third round.

If you actually have an offer from McKinsey to be an Associate, I would definitely take it. The brand name of that place is so well respected that even if you don't crush it there and don't have the google/KKR/Goldman/Amazon exit opps, you can always apply to business school and get in pretty much anywhere with a good GMAT. I think Mckinsey is the riskier option, but definitely worth the risk.


I'm that above poster that said McK>>>V100. This person ($$$$$) has no idea what he's talking about and is really drinking the McK kool aid.

(1) I actually went through the full recruiting process
(2) no one calls it the "third round", and the % I told you above is from first-hand experience. Also, $$$$$$ can't do math. 80% x 15% x 10% = 1.2%, which is roughly 1 in 50.
(3) no one leaves mck and goes to b-school after being an associate. only analysts do that
(4) kkr/goldman exits are unheard of from mck (it's really rare). PE/VC is very hard to get because PE/VCs usually hire from banks.


What if one wanted to work at McKinsey, and then go to I-banking? Then wouldn't it make sense to go the MBA route after being an associate?

Post-McK folks don't really want to do i-banking as a career, and if they do, then they would take a management position via the networking they've done during the job. Typically, after McK, the finance-oriented folks will try to exit into VC/PE, and if not there, Corp. finance. I could be wrong, but it seems to me that the overwhelming view is that you should not be pursuing another degree after a JD.


I think you might be right about McK people not typically going for IBD, but I'm not sure you can say that you should never get a degree after a JD. It's exceptionally rare to go from law (even corporate biglaw) to IBD on the finance side, for instance, but I know of a few JDs who realized they hated law after a few years and so went back to get their MBAs so they could switch to finance.

Anonymous User
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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 01, 2013 1:59 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I'm that above poster that said McK>>>V100. This person ($$$$$) has no idea what he's talking about and is really drinking the McK kool aid.

(1) I actually went through the full recruiting process
(2) no one calls it the "third round", and the % I told you above is from first-hand experience. Also, $$$$$$ can't do math. 80% x 15% x 10% = 1.2%, which is roughly 1 in 50.
(3) no one leaves mck and goes to b-school after being an associate. only analysts do that
(4) kkr/goldman exits are unheard of from mck (it's really rare). PE/VC is very hard to get because PE/VCs usually hire from banks.


What if one wanted to work at McKinsey, and then go to I-banking? Then wouldn't it make sense to go the MBA route after being an associate?

Post-McK folks don't really want to do i-banking as a career, and if they do, then they would take a management position via the networking they've done during the job. Typically, after McK, the finance-oriented folks will try to exit into VC/PE, and if not there, Corp. finance. I could be wrong, but it seems to me that the overwhelming view is that you should not be pursuing another degree after a JD.


I think you might be right about McK people not typically going for IBD, but I'm not sure you can say that you should never get a degree after a JD. It's exceptionally rare to go from law (even corporate biglaw) to IBD on the finance side, for instance, but I know of a few JDs who realized they hated law after a few years and so went back to get their MBAs so they could switch to finance.

The JD --> law --> finance route is very different from the JD --> McK --> finance route. First, I think the relationship between IBD and law is kind of condescending, whereas elite bankers usually view McK consultants as equals. Second, it's my understanding that the exit from law to a bank usually still lands that lawyer in a legal capacity -- in some ways, lawyers are pigeon-holed.

So it makes sense that a lawyer might get an MBA to change careers altogether. It doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me that a post-McK associate would forego a salary and then get a very-likely-unsponsored MBA to get into finance.

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Re: McKinsey vs. V100 Biglaw (East Coast)

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Sep 01, 2013 9:02 am

Anonymous User wrote:I think you might be right about McK people not typically going for IBD, but I'm not sure you can say that you should never get a degree after a JD. It's exceptionally rare to go from law (even corporate biglaw) to IBD on the finance side, for instance, but I know of a few JDs who realized they hated law after a few years and so went back to get their MBAs so they could switch to finance.


You don't need MBA to go into finance as a lawyer. I know of Wachtell/S&C/CSM associates who became bankers at GS/JPM/MS as associates/VPs.




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