What is the lateral interviewing process like?

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Sun Aug 11, 2013 11:11 am

I see a lot of Q&A about the OCI interviewing process, and haven't really found much regarding lateral interviewing. I've been interested in making a lateral move (just finished my first year of work at a small firm) and have had a recent interview at a big firm and am hoping for more. But the process of getting hired as a lateral, generally speaking, seems like a big black box.

For those of you out there who know - what is this process like from the inside, from the time you look at a candidate's resume to the time you make an offer?

In terms of the first interview - how long after that will you decide to ask the candidate back for a second? A third?

My process has been very, very long. What is the reason that lateral hiring is so drawn out as compared to hiring at OCI?

Any insight on the process would be so much appreciate, and thank you in advance!

TooOld4This
Posts: 638
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2011 11:09 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby TooOld4This » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:32 pm

OCI is about finding X number of intelligent warm bodies (most of whom have no idea what type of law they want to practice) to meet largely unknown needs two years in the future. The entire process is on a strict timeline.

Lateral hiring is usually about identifying current needs and matching candidates with at least some skills and career history into the spot. There is no time table. Even when he need is somewhat urgent, pace can be slow because the people who need more associates are often underwater just trying to keep up work demands. Also, the consequences of a bad hire are somewhat more acute, since you can't no-offer the candidate after an SA and you can't just hope they go join some other group if you don't like them.

Basically, lateral hiring is much more like the hiring that takes place in most other careers. OCI is completely artificial and should never be used as a yardstick.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:41 pm

It really varies. I've gotten an offer after a single round of interviews.

LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:49 pm

Thank you for the response - the longer timeline (if there can be said to be one at all) makes complete sense from that perspective.

Would 2 months from first interview to offer be unusual, then, or even longer?

I received a positive reception after my initial interview, and no rejection yet (I am working with a headhunter who has been keeping tabs), just a lot of delay in receiving a positive answer for whatever reason there may be (I am guessing there are other candidates). I just wish I knew what went on inside the firm, I think it's a mix of genuine curiosity and impatience, and I have a feeling the other firms I'm looking at will be equally slow.

LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:49 pm

Anonymous User wrote:It really varies. I've gotten an offer after a single round of interviews.


That's pretty phenomenal - big firm as well?

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Aug 11, 2013 2:49 pm

LittleMM wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:It really varies. I've gotten an offer after a single round of interviews.


That's pretty phenomenal - big firm as well?



Yes, but to be fair... the firm is really actively looking for laterals and I'm fairly ahead of the game (went to top school, applied from top firm, experience is basically ahead of standard class year, solid reasons).

Pretty happy with current firm, so decision will be tough.

User avatar
ExBiglawAssociate
Posts: 2092
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 7:06 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby ExBiglawAssociate » Sun Aug 11, 2013 3:38 pm

A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.

LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Sun Aug 11, 2013 3:56 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
LittleMM wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:It really varies. I've gotten an offer after a single round of interviews.


That's pretty phenomenal - big firm as well?



Yes, but to be fair... the firm is really actively looking for laterals and I'm fairly ahead of the game (went to top school, applied from top firm, experience is basically ahead of standard class year, solid reasons).

Pretty happy with current firm, so decision will be tough.


Congratulations (even if it poses a tough choice)! If you don't mind me asking, why seek to leave your top firm, and is the firm with which you interviewed on par?

LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Sun Aug 11, 2013 4:00 pm

Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.


It's true that it isn't easy. And I'm coming from a small firm, which worries me. But we'll see how the hunt turns out.

Still, once a firm is interested and initiates the interview process, there is hope, right? (Especially with no immediate rejection?)

User avatar
Old Gregg
Posts: 5413
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:26 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Old Gregg » Sun Aug 11, 2013 4:07 pm

Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.


Lot's of factors, but if you're at a blue chip law firm, have good experience in an in demand field, shouldn't be difficult at all.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Aug 11, 2013 5:02 pm

LittleMM wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
LittleMM wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:It really varies. I've gotten an offer after a single round of interviews.


That's pretty phenomenal - big firm as well?



Yes, but to be fair... the firm is really actively looking for laterals and I'm fairly ahead of the game (went to top school, applied from top firm, experience is basically ahead of standard class year, solid reasons).

Pretty happy with current firm, so decision will be tough.


Congratulations (even if it poses a tough choice)! If you don't mind me asking, why seek to leave your top firm, and is the firm with which you interviewed on par?


Practice area is a good, but not a perfect fit for what I want to do and doesn't have as solid exits down the line. But I still really like the practice area and the financial health of the firm provides a significant amount of stability that's difficult to disregard. On top of that, I just really like the people I work with and the firm overall.

Firm I interviewed with is not on par nationally, but is superior locally and provides the gilded resume line for exits into local companies if I wanted to choose that path.

User avatar
ExBiglawAssociate
Posts: 2092
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 7:06 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby ExBiglawAssociate » Sun Aug 11, 2013 7:28 pm

Fresh Prince wrote:
Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.


Lot's of factors, but if you're at a blue chip law firm, have good experience in an in demand field, shouldn't be difficult at all.


It really depends on your year too. I was referring more to senior associates looking for competitive in house jobs or lateral biglaw positions, since I've seen more of these types leave biglaw recently than juniors. I think this is right for people with 3-5 years of experience at a good firm.

LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Sun Aug 11, 2013 10:40 pm

Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:
Fresh Prince wrote:
Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.


Lot's of factors, but if you're at a blue chip law firm, have good experience in an in demand field, shouldn't be difficult at all.


It really depends on your year too. I was referring more to senior associates looking for competitive in house jobs or lateral biglaw positions, since I've seen more of these types leave biglaw recently than juniors. I think this is right for people with 3-5 years of experience at a good firm.


Do you have any POV on attorneys 1-2 years in?

Recently, in my market, it seems as though a number of big firms are seeking associates 1-4 years in. It isn't common, per se, but not uncommon.

User avatar
Old Gregg
Posts: 5413
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:26 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Old Gregg » Mon Aug 12, 2013 2:02 am

Do you have any POV on attorneys 1-2 years in?


Extremely difficult.

lolwat
Posts: 604
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 2:30 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby lolwat » Mon Aug 12, 2013 10:12 am

I'm treated differently depending on firms but I'm still somewhat basically a lateral (clerkship). Short answer is that it varies. I've had interviews where I guess I bombed them and have a rejection letter 4 days later (i.e., long enough for them to get feedback and send out the letter the day after), interviews where they tell me they'll get back to me in ~2 weeks the next time their recruiting committee meets, and interviews where someone sufficiently in charge conducted the interview and asked about scheduling a callback at the end of the interview.

I think there's more of an element of finding the perfect fit in lateral hiring for some of the reasons stated previously. They don't have 8-10 weeks to evaluate you and can't just no-offer you after those 8-10 weeks if they don't think you're a good fit.

On a side note, if the headhunter you're working with is one that gets fees from the firm, you might want to try and do a little more self-applying. I've worked with a few of them and they can be amazingly helpful (I mean, they get paid to be helpful, so they are), but I also know in at least one case that the legal recruiter fee was a factor (although I'm not sure how big of one) that the committee considered.

LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Mon Aug 12, 2013 11:32 am

lolwat wrote:I'm treated differently depending on firms but I'm still somewhat basically a lateral (clerkship). Short answer is that it varies. I've had interviews where I guess I bombed them and have a rejection letter 4 days later (i.e., long enough for them to get feedback and send out the letter the day after), interviews where they tell me they'll get back to me in ~2 weeks the next time their recruiting committee meets, and interviews where someone sufficiently in charge conducted the interview and asked about scheduling a callback at the end of the interview.

I think there's more of an element of finding the perfect fit in lateral hiring for some of the reasons stated previously. They don't have 8-10 weeks to evaluate you and can't just no-offer you after those 8-10 weeks if they don't think you're a good fit.

On a side note, if the headhunter you're working with is one that gets fees from the firm, you might want to try and do a little more self-applying. I've worked with a few of them and they can be amazingly helpful (I mean, they get paid to be helpful, so they are), but I also know in at least one case that the legal recruiter fee was a factor (although I'm not sure how big of one) that the committee considered.


Thank you for this response. I'm learning that it is going to differ, and I just have to accept that. The one firm that I really thought was perfect for me is dragging the process out, but I know I can't read into that in either direction. I am considering giving them a call to push a little, but don't know that that's the best move.

What has your experience been like in your own search, in terms of number of positions available to you? Your credentials are likely equivalent to or better than mine (assumed from clerkship); are you in a primary market?

It isn't ideal, but using a headhunter helps me avoid letting my current firm in on the fact that I am looking elsewhere. Do you have any advice on beginning the job search solo (best resources to learn about openings, etc.)? It's difficult to network while still employed full time here, but I know that because of the cost, a headhunter can end up being a hindrance.

lolwat
Posts: 604
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2010 2:30 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby lolwat » Mon Aug 12, 2013 8:05 pm

I'm not sure you should call, but if it's been like a month or more, I'm not sure it would hurt to check in. I've had mixed results doing that. I mean, I have an upcoming interview after e-mailing back and forth and me checking in with them once or twice when I hadn't heard from them in awhile, but I've also had rejection letters come after checking in with them. Who knows if those rejections were a result of checking in or not.

As far as my experience on positions open, my resume is a bit unique so I'm not sure how useful my answer would be. I'm not personally in a primary market, but I've searched in all of the primary markets. Results are really strange; I've applied to a number of positions seeking 1-3 years of experience and had nothing come from those, while I've applied to firms that don't list open positions (or don't have an appropriate position available for my experience level) and received interviews because by some stroke of luck they're needing a junior level associate. But it's been something like ~200 applications for <10 interviews. (Most people have more luck than that.)

Speaking of which, that's really where headhunters come in useful: they are able to identify open positions that others might not know about, and firms that you might be interested in that you might not otherwise know about. You're looking at big firms, right? In general, my advice is to identify the firms that you're looking at and just go to their website. Inquiries are confidential anyway (or at least generally are), so as long as you do it from a personal email and during your own time (i.e., not on firm computer) you should be fine. There are a lot of big firms that don't accept inquiries from legal recruiters, so you're likely missing out on a bunch of fairly obvious openings.

LittleMM
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:23 pm

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby LittleMM » Wed Aug 14, 2013 11:07 am

Thanks for sharing, lolwat.

It sounds like you really branched out and applied to a great handful of firms. Did you call their recruiting department and inquire about openings?

As I look at firm websites, the ones that don't openly post positions seem to suggest just getting in touch and submitting a resume. Is that where you found success?

Btw, 10/200 ain't bad! If I have that luck, I will be pretty pleased.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 15, 2015 5:17 pm

Old Gregg wrote:
Do you have any POV on attorneys 1-2 years in?


Extremely difficult.


Bumping this to see if anyone else has input re: lateraling very early on in your career.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 15, 2015 5:50 pm

I lateraled in the 1-2 year range, so I have some perspective on the process. The bottom line is that it varies from firm to firm and depending on the circumstances.

I had come out of a T14 school and joined a V25 firm I really liked, but where I wasn't able to join the practice group I wanted (the area of law I had always wanted to do). So I was forced to begin my lateral search far earlier than expected. Getting the interviews wasn't too tough to the extent other firms were looking for junior associates in that particular practice group. I ended up interviewing with a number of excellent firms in my desired area.

The process was different at each place. At one biglaw firm, I went for three visits before a decision was made. At a smaller boutique firm, I went for two visits before I received a decision. At the firm I ultimately ended up with (a slightly more regional biglaw firm), I received my offer after just one interview during which I met with literally everyone in the practice group in waves over the course of the afternoon (was being interviewed by up to 3 people at a time). The style of interview was generally consistent across all places. Much of it was like OCI in that they want to gauge whether they could see themselves working with you. But a substantial portion was obviously aimed at my 1.5 years of experience in practice, what skills I had gained, why I wanted to change practice groups, what background I had in my desired area, etc.

Note that 2 of the 3 firms asked me for my law school transcripts, so don't assume that grades lose their importance once you are a lateral. They will still be a factor (though they likely become less significant the further out of school you are and the more skills you have gained).

Also, I worked with a recruiter who had a really deep knowledge of my desired area of practice (she had worked in that practice area and seemed to know a ton of people). I woudln't have worked with just any old recruiter. But I just happened to meet a specific one that really suited my needs. She had no trouble setting me up with interviews, telling me about the people I'd be meeting, staying on top of all our leads, etc.

Finally, the process can take awhile, especially if you are looking for something specific. From the time I began the search to the time I left my old firm was a period of 5 months, and many people take the better part of a year to find the right position via a lateral search. Others strike gold within just a few weeks. Can't assume a timeframe in advance.

Happy to answer additional Q's you may have about lateraling as a very junior associate

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 15, 2015 7:06 pm

Sounds like you also lateralled into a different market, which is also what I am looking to do.

Was this difficult considering that you had to go to multiple rounds of interviews? I can't imagine taking that many days off work without raising red flags.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 15, 2015 7:16 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Sounds like you also lateralled into a different market, which is also what I am looking to do.

Was this difficult considering that you had to go to multiple rounds of interviews? I can't imagine taking that many days off work without raising red flags.


Nah, it was in the same market. I would imagine lateralling to a different market wouldn't be much harder so long as you have some ties to the area.

As for days off from work, I'm sure it started raising some red flags past a certain point. Anyone with a brain could start to put the pieces together. I generally tried to schedule interviews as early or late in the day as possible and then just play it off as a doctor's appointment or something. If you are shooting for a different market, obviously you can't do that, and will have to come up with another excuse.

I will say this though. Make sure to act like everything is good and jolly while at work. If you seem super happy, satisfied, and fulfilled, then it raises less of a red flag when you are out a few days. But I'm too transparent. Everyone knew I wanted to be in group X, but was in group Y, and that I had done literally everything in my power to get into group X. I was disinterested, unfulfilled and generally not engaged in the group Y work, so when I was absent multiple times over the course of a month or two, anyone looking close enough could put the pieces together. So don't make that mistake of mine, and don't wear any dissatisfaction on your sleeve (to the extent you are dissatisfied)

User avatar
nealric
Posts: 2395
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 9:53 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby nealric » Wed Dec 16, 2015 12:55 pm

Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.


In my experience, that's relatively uncommon unless the seeker is just expecting a recruiter to do all the work or is wed to a small market or rare sub specialty. I wouldn't say it's easy to lateral- requires a lot of legwork, but I think the vast majority of biglaw associates could lateral within a year if that's what they wanted and they were willing to put in the hard work to do it. It took me 8 months, but I ended up with several options in the end. I was moving to a different city, which complicated the process considerably. I did probably 5 3-day weekends during that period and had one day that involved getting on a plane at 5AM, flying to the new city, interviewing at 8AM and one place, interviewing at 1PM at another, and doing an informational interview at 4PM at a third.

As for the process: I would echo others who say it's all over the map. Most firms do a round-robin callback style interview with a meal for serious lateral candidates, but there may also be initial or followup meetings on top of it. Timelines can be really weird. I got an offer almost 6 months after a callback (well after I had accepted another position). A lot of this is because the lateral hiring process tends to be driven by practice group leaders instead of recruiting folks. The practice group leaders have a lot of other stuff on their plate, so lateral hiring may get put on the back burner if they get busy or feel the hiring need isn't too intense. Also, a firm may feel they have a need and things could change. They may decide not to hire at all, or wait a year and see if they really need someone (this happened to me at one firm).

Anonymous User
Posts: 273386
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 16, 2015 1:09 pm

nealric wrote:
Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.


In my experience, that's relatively uncommon unless the seeker is just expecting a recruiter to do all the work or is wed to a small market or rare sub specialty. I wouldn't say it's easy to lateral- requires a lot of legwork, but I think the vast majority of biglaw associates could lateral within a year if that's what they wanted and they were willing to put in the hard work to do it. It took me 8 months, but I ended up with several options in the end. I was moving to a different city, which complicated the process considerably. I did probably 5 3-day weekends during that period and had one day that involved getting on a plane at 5AM, flying to the new city, interviewing at 8AM and one place, interviewing at 1PM at another, and doing an informational interview at 4PM at a third.

As for the process: I would echo others who say it's all over the map. Most firms do a round-robin callback style interview with a meal for serious lateral candidates, but there may also be initial or followup meetings on top of it. Timelines can be really weird. I got an offer almost 6 months after a callback (well after I had accepted another position). A lot of this is because the lateral hiring process tends to be driven by practice group leaders instead of recruiting folks. The practice group leaders have a lot of other stuff on their plate, so lateral hiring may get put on the back burner if they get busy or feel the hiring need isn't too intense. Also, a firm may feel they have a need and things could change. They may decide not to hire at all, or wait a year and see if they really need someone (this happened to me at one firm).



I'm currently trying to position myself to lateral to a different market and I have only just started at my firm in the fall. I know its a long process, so I figure I might as well start now.

I have been in touch with a recruiter, but what else should I do? Reach out to alums at firms in the region I am targeting? Send resumes out to recruiters cold?

User avatar
nealric
Posts: 2395
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 9:53 am

Re: What is the lateral interviewing process like?

Postby nealric » Wed Dec 16, 2015 1:29 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
nealric wrote:
Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:A common misconception among law students is that it will be easy to land a lateral job once you have biglaw. This is usually not the case. Some people actively look for a lateral position for 2-3 years without finding anything. They often end up settling for much lower paying jobs at small law firms or sometimes even leave law altogether.


In my experience, that's relatively uncommon unless the seeker is just expecting a recruiter to do all the work or is wed to a small market or rare sub specialty. I wouldn't say it's easy to lateral- requires a lot of legwork, but I think the vast majority of biglaw associates could lateral within a year if that's what they wanted and they were willing to put in the hard work to do it. It took me 8 months, but I ended up with several options in the end. I was moving to a different city, which complicated the process considerably. I did probably 5 3-day weekends during that period and had one day that involved getting on a plane at 5AM, flying to the new city, interviewing at 8AM and one place, interviewing at 1PM at another, and doing an informational interview at 4PM at a third.

As for the process: I would echo others who say it's all over the map. Most firms do a round-robin callback style interview with a meal for serious lateral candidates, but there may also be initial or followup meetings on top of it. Timelines can be really weird. I got an offer almost 6 months after a callback (well after I had accepted another position). A lot of this is because the lateral hiring process tends to be driven by practice group leaders instead of recruiting folks. The practice group leaders have a lot of other stuff on their plate, so lateral hiring may get put on the back burner if they get busy or feel the hiring need isn't too intense. Also, a firm may feel they have a need and things could change. They may decide not to hire at all, or wait a year and see if they really need someone (this happened to me at one firm).



I'm currently trying to position myself to lateral to a different market and I have only just started at my firm in the fall. I know its a long process, so I figure I might as well start now.

I have been in touch with a recruiter, but what else should I do? Reach out to alums at firms in the region I am targeting? Send resumes out to recruiters cold?


Make a list of firms that have your practice area. Talk to everyone you know at any of those firms- then find out if they have any friends who would be willing to talk to you. Alumni you may have overlapped with in school can work in a pinch, but it's best to have a personal connection. Find out who has a need, who they recommend working for, etc. Avoid cold contact unless you are 100% sure you don't know anyone at all and have exhausted attempt to find friends of friends at the firm. Don't officially apply until you have spoken to someone. Recruiters were a waste of my time, but it's worth at least talking to them. Be very careful about giving them resumes because some will shop it all over town and torpedo your efforts from networking. All things being equal, a firm would prefer not to get you from a recruiter because they don't want to pay the fee.




Return to “Legal Employment”

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.