Attrition at V5 (NY)

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Fri May 10, 2013 3:15 pm

I'm working at a V5 this summer in NY and I was looking at the size of our SA class compared to the total number of lawyers and it's sort of insane, implying that attrition is very, very high. Can someone give me an idea of what the attrition rate per year is like? Like how many associates make it through one year? Two?

My guess is that for the numbers to work out, no more than 50% of associates make it through two years. But that's not optimal, at all, for in-house or lateral or anything. What do those people do?

User avatar
OneMoreLawHopeful
Posts: 1191
Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2012 6:21 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby OneMoreLawHopeful » Fri May 10, 2013 3:27 pm

Keep in mind that summer classes collapsed in 2009, 2010, 2011, so the number of first and second year associates reflects smaller class sizes as well as attrition.

As an example, according to NALP, Skadden took 38 summers in 2011, followed by 66 in 2012. It's easy to look at the class of first year associates, compare it with the 2013 summer class, and think "Many must have left!" when in truth there weren't as many to begin with.

That's not to say there isn't a lot of attrition, there definitely is - just be careful about how you gauge it.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Fri May 10, 2013 3:32 pm

That's true. Fair point. But it seems at most of the V5, the NY summer associate class size is 20% of the total number of lawyers in NY. I just don't get how the math works out.

wisdom
Posts: 43
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2013 8:05 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby wisdom » Fri May 10, 2013 3:38 pm

It works out because there is indeed massive attrition. Lots of people leave law altogether, some people go teach, go back to school, leave to clerk, go into government, etc. I think attrition really must be such that 50 percent of your class year is gone within three years. After all, by the time it gets to partner-making time, there will be < 10 people from your incoming class who are still there.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Fri May 10, 2013 3:41 pm

Fair enough. I guess my neurotic concern is that even if I want to stay and do reasonably well, I'll be pushed out within 2-3 years and will be F'ed. In terms of that high attrition rate, how much is people being pushed versus pushing themselves?

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Fri May 10, 2013 8:47 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Fair enough. I guess my neurotic concern is that even if I want to stay and do reasonably well, I'll be pushed out within 2-3 years and will be F'ed. In terms of that high attrition rate, how much is people being pushed versus pushing themselves?


In the end, attrition is generally because of one of two reasons (or both). After a while either the associate can't cut it (either hours or work product) or the associate can't stand it anymore--or a combination of both.

Please see this: http://thepeoplestherapist.com/2012/10/ ... -bartleby/

Here is an excerpt:

I got my first taste of the answer one dismal night in a Sullivan & Cromwell conference room.

My second or third assignment at S&C had me reporting to a senior associate in the real estate group. I’ll never forget this guy (he haunts my dreams, and appears in several of these columns) – an obese, greasy-haired ogre with yellowed fingernails perpetually clutching a smoldering Marlboro.

On our first evening together, it became apparent we were the only attorneys assigned to this deal… and we were in for a late night. We ordered food – I remember an aluminum foil take-out container of eggplant parmesan – and were sitting in a conference room together, with said victuals, at around ten p.m. At which juncture I chose to deliver the following oration:

“It looks like we’ll be spending a lot of time together on this deal – so we might as well get to know one another. I never thought I’d end up on a real estate deal, but I guess why not? Anyway, I’m originally from New Jersey, grew up in the suburbs. You might hear a lot of jazz and classical music coming out of my office – those are my big passions. What are your hobbies in the outside world?”

The real estate ogre cut me off with a riposte as ingenious in its precision as it was elegant in its profanity.

“Do you think I give a ****ing shit who you are or any of your bull****? Shut the **** up.”

And so I did. I shut the **** up.

Voila! We understood one another – and I assimilated an essential lesson of biglaw, with especial regard to my place within it. As we fed in silence, cherished notions of “collegiality,”“white shoe tradition,” “patrician institutions,” “practicing law,” “the profession of law,” “the Sullivan & Cromwell way” – and other such bullcrap and associated bullcrap of a similar nature miraculously fell by the wayside. I became, as they say in Scientology, “clear.”

I was a slave. I was owned. I did what he told me to do. I didn’t pretend he was my friend, or even a close acquaintance, or that he “gave a ****ing s*** about me or any of my bull****.” No one there did. That isn’t how S&C works.

User avatar
A. Nony Mouse
Posts: 22887
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 11:51 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sat May 11, 2013 1:14 am

God, I loathe that example (and the people's therapist generally). I'm sure S&C sucks rocks and am happy to believe that biglaw is miserable (not doing biglaw myself), but the guy sounds like he's writing a personal ad ("I grew up in the suburbs of New Jersey and my passions are jazz and classical music"? who cares?). If I were facing an all-nighter with someone, that conversational gambit would annoy the heck out of me, too. Work is work, it's not the place to find your next best friend.

User avatar
Borg
Posts: 370
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 6:08 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Borg » Sat May 11, 2013 2:28 am

A. Nony Mouse wrote:God, I loathe that example (and the people's therapist generally). I'm sure S&C sucks rocks and am happy to believe that biglaw is miserable (not doing biglaw myself), but the guy sounds like he's writing a personal ad ("I grew up in the suburbs of New Jersey and my passions are jazz and classical music"? who cares?). If I were facing an all-nighter with someone, that conversational gambit would annoy the heck out of me, too. Work is work, it's not the place to find your next best friend.


I agree, that guy sounds super fucking annoying and I don't blame the other guy for not wanting to talk. I'd hate to work with either of them. I also agree that biglaw in general is terrible, and it has always puzzled me why thousands of allegedly smart people are willing to go running into the lion's open mouth after having seen thousands before them go in there and not come out. Do people think that the firms can take enormous classes because they are growing? Do they actually think the "exit options" that everyone talks about are anything other than the same shitty work with a little bit less pressure? Working in a cubicle at some company for the sake of low six figures for the rest of my life sounds awful.

User avatar
bizzybone1313
Posts: 996
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2012 4:31 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby bizzybone1313 » Sat May 11, 2013 2:52 am

Borg wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:God, I loathe that example (and the people's therapist generally). I'm sure S&C sucks rocks and am happy to believe that biglaw is miserable (not doing biglaw myself), but the guy sounds like he's writing a personal ad ("I grew up in the suburbs of New Jersey and my passions are jazz and classical music"? who cares?). If I were facing an all-nighter with someone, that conversational gambit would annoy the heck out of me, too. Work is work, it's not the place to find your next best friend.


I agree, that guy sounds super fucking annoying and I don't blame the other guy for not wanting to talk. I'd hate to work with either of them. I also agree that biglaw in general is terrible, and it has always puzzled me why thousands of allegedly smart people are willing to go running into the lion's open mouth after having seen thousands before them go in there and not come out. Do people think that the firms can take enormous classes because they are growing? Do they actually think the "exit options" that everyone talks about are anything other than the same shitty work with a little bit less pressure? Working in a cubicle at some company for the sake of low six figures for the rest of my life sounds awful.


I agree. So what is the alternative with a prefstigious T-14 law degree?

westphillybandr
Posts: 150
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2012 9:52 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby westphillybandr » Sat May 11, 2013 2:56 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Fair enough. I guess my neurotic concern is that even if I want to stay and do reasonably well, I'll be pushed out within 2-3 years and will be F'ed. In terms of that high attrition rate, how much is people being pushed versus pushing themselves?


In the end, attrition is generally because of one of two reasons (or both). After a while either the associate can't cut it (either hours or work product) or the associate can't stand it anymore--or a combination of both.

Please see this: http://thepeoplestherapist.com/2012/10/ ... -bartleby/

Here is an excerpt:

I got my first taste of the answer one dismal night in a Sullivan & Cromwell conference room.

My second or third assignment at S&C had me reporting to a senior associate in the real estate group. I’ll never forget this guy (he haunts my dreams, and appears in several of these columns) – an obese, greasy-haired ogre with yellowed fingernails perpetually clutching a smoldering Marlboro.

On our first evening together, it became apparent we were the only attorneys assigned to this deal… and we were in for a late night. We ordered food – I remember an aluminum foil take-out container of eggplant parmesan – and were sitting in a conference room together, with said victuals, at around ten p.m. At which juncture I chose to deliver the following oration:

“It looks like we’ll be spending a lot of time together on this deal – so we might as well get to know one another. I never thought I’d end up on a real estate deal, but I guess why not? Anyway, I’m originally from New Jersey, grew up in the suburbs. You might hear a lot of jazz and classical music coming out of my office – those are my big passions. What are your hobbies in the outside world?”

The real estate ogre cut me off with a riposte as ingenious in its precision as it was elegant in its profanity.

“Do you think I give a ****ing shit who you are or any of your bull****? Shut the **** up.”

And so I did. I shut the **** up.

Voila! We understood one another – and I assimilated an essential lesson of biglaw, with especial regard to my place within it. As we fed in silence, cherished notions of “collegiality,”“white shoe tradition,” “patrician institutions,” “practicing law,” “the profession of law,” “the Sullivan & Cromwell way” – and other such bullcrap and associated bullcrap of a similar nature miraculously fell by the wayside. I became, as they say in Scientology, “clear.”

I was a slave. I was owned. I did what he told me to do. I didn’t pretend he was my friend, or even a close acquaintance, or that he “gave a ****ing s*** about me or any of my bull****.” No one there did. That isn’t how S&C works.


Yea this guy is trying to sell books. you shouldn't go to his blog for realistic info

User avatar
thesealocust
Posts: 8448
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2008 8:50 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby thesealocust » Sat May 11, 2013 3:58 am

Attrition is very, very high.

jitsrenzo
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Sep 11, 2008 10:48 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby jitsrenzo » Sat May 11, 2013 5:54 am

Over the summer, just look at how many departure memos you get.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat May 11, 2013 8:22 am

westphillybandr wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Fair enough. I guess my neurotic concern is that even if I want to stay and do reasonably well, I'll be pushed out within 2-3 years and will be F'ed. In terms of that high attrition rate, how much is people being pushed versus pushing themselves?


In the end, attrition is generally because of one of two reasons (or both). After a while either the associate can't cut it (either hours or work product) or the associate can't stand it anymore--or a combination of both.

Please see this: http://thepeoplestherapist.com/2012/10/ ... -bartleby/

Here is an excerpt:

I got my first taste of the answer one dismal night in a Sullivan & Cromwell conference room.

My second or third assignment at S&C had me reporting to a senior associate in the real estate group. I’ll never forget this guy (he haunts my dreams, and appears in several of these columns) – an obese, greasy-haired ogre with yellowed fingernails perpetually clutching a smoldering Marlboro.

On our first evening together, it became apparent we were the only attorneys assigned to this deal… and we were in for a late night. We ordered food – I remember an aluminum foil take-out container of eggplant parmesan – and were sitting in a conference room together, with said victuals, at around ten p.m. At which juncture I chose to deliver the following oration:

“It looks like we’ll be spending a lot of time together on this deal – so we might as well get to know one another. I never thought I’d end up on a real estate deal, but I guess why not? Anyway, I’m originally from New Jersey, grew up in the suburbs. You might hear a lot of jazz and classical music coming out of my office – those are my big passions. What are your hobbies in the outside world?”

The real estate ogre cut me off with a riposte as ingenious in its precision as it was elegant in its profanity.

“Do you think I give a ****ing shit who you are or any of your bull****? Shut the **** up.”

And so I did. I shut the **** up.

Voila! We understood one another – and I assimilated an essential lesson of biglaw, with especial regard to my place within it. As we fed in silence, cherished notions of “collegiality,”“white shoe tradition,” “patrician institutions,” “practicing law,” “the profession of law,” “the Sullivan & Cromwell way” – and other such bullcrap and associated bullcrap of a similar nature miraculously fell by the wayside. I became, as they say in Scientology, “clear.”

I was a slave. I was owned. I did what he told me to do. I didn’t pretend he was my friend, or even a close acquaintance, or that he “gave a ****ing s*** about me or any of my bull****.” No one there did. That isn’t how S&C works.


Yea this guy is trying to sell books. you shouldn't go to his blog for realistic info


Fair enough. Selling books or not, it's an accurate depiction of S&C and the rest of the v5 (maybe aside from WLRK which people I know who work there love the people but the hours are even worse).

User avatar
Borg
Posts: 370
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 6:08 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Borg » Sat May 11, 2013 9:16 am

bizzybone1313 wrote:
Borg wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:God, I loathe that example (and the people's therapist generally). I'm sure S&C sucks rocks and am happy to believe that biglaw is miserable (not doing biglaw myself), but the guy sounds like he's writing a personal ad ("I grew up in the suburbs of New Jersey and my passions are jazz and classical music"? who cares?). If I were facing an all-nighter with someone, that conversational gambit would annoy the heck out of me, too. Work is work, it's not the place to find your next best friend.


I agree, that guy sounds super fucking annoying and I don't blame the other guy for not wanting to talk. I'd hate to work with either of them. I also agree that biglaw in general is terrible, and it has always puzzled me why thousands of allegedly smart people are willing to go running into the lion's open mouth after having seen thousands before them go in there and not come out. Do people think that the firms can take enormous classes because they are growing? Do they actually think the "exit options" that everyone talks about are anything other than the same shitty work with a little bit less pressure? Working in a cubicle at some company for the sake of low six figures for the rest of my life sounds awful.


I agree. So what is the alternative with a prefstigious T-14 law degree?


I'm going into banking and then elsewhere from there. For those who want to litigate, I think the answer is to go be a public defender or something and get significant trial experience, and then open a private practice. I feel like that would be a better, more interesting, and potentially more lucrative path than 95% of litigators in biglaw wind up on. For those who want to do corporate, I guess big firms are the only option. Based on my own experience, I think that law students should make a much bigger effort to learn about business and finance and become more malleable. Take corporate finance, accounting, and other courses in the business school instead of yet another bullshit law class.

wisdom
Posts: 43
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2013 8:05 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby wisdom » Sat May 11, 2013 10:17 am

Anonymous User wrote:Fair enough. Selling books or not, it's an accurate depiction of S&C and the rest of the v5 (maybe aside from WLRK which people I know who work there love the people but the hours are even worse).


Cannot tell if this is a joke (the comment re: Wachtell). Like every other big firm it houses a broad range of personality types and I have heard many stories about how unpleasant it can be to work there. 2700+ hours billed combined with unhappy seniors cracking the whip is not a recipe for a workplace that one can love.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat May 11, 2013 10:18 am

At my firm, I asked around about this, and heard that approximately 3/4 of associates leave by the 3-4 year mark. So yes, attrition is very high, but that is expected. No one said you will be forced out the door at 3-4 year. Quite the contrary. It will be you bolting toward it when other opportunities arise that you are actually qualified for given your 3-4 years of experience.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat May 11, 2013 11:39 am

2012 V5 SA. Worked on ten or so projects with assorted Cap Markets and M&A associates last year. Did a cursory check on the firm website, and I'd say about 50% of the people I worked with are gone. Exits range from secondary city biglaw, in house, and one dude went into banking (another into ECM). Others I haven't spoken to or haven't been able to trace after about a minute of searching on teh Internet. The associates still around are currently second years; the lion's share of departures were at the 2+ level.


This is to be expected though. I had lunch with a partner who quite candidly talked about the exit options I'd have after a few years. Neither of us were entertaining the notion that I'd want to stick around for partner.

imchuckbass58
Posts: 1245
Joined: Mon Mar 16, 2009 3:24 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby imchuckbass58 » Sat May 11, 2013 2:43 pm

This article cites S&C as having an attrition rate in the mid-2000s of ~30% per year. This is considered high - the article cites an attrition rate of ~20% for all law firms with more than 501 attorneys, according to NALP: http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2007/01/24/sul ... te-morale/

Keep in mind that's across all years. I imagine attrition in year one is lower than average, attrition in years 3-5 is higher than average (midlevels start to get fed up and have good exit options), and attrition in years 6-7 is lower than average (most of these people are gunning for partner, but won't be pushed out until they don't make it).

But, if you were to assume that attrition is constant at 20%, that implies out of a initial cohort of 100, the following amount would be left at the beginning of year:

2nd year: 80
3rd year: 64
4th year: 51
5th year: 41
6th year: 33
7th year: 26
8th year: 21
Partner/Counsel/9th year: 17

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat May 11, 2013 11:36 pm

imchuckbass58 wrote:This article cites S&C as having an attrition rate in the mid-2000s of ~30% per year. This is considered high - the article cites an attrition rate of ~20% for all law firms with more than 501 attorneys, according to NALP: http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2007/01/24/sul ... te-morale/

Keep in mind that's across all years. I imagine attrition in year one is lower than average, attrition in years 3-5 is higher than average (midlevels start to get fed up and have good exit options), and attrition in years 6-7 is lower than average (most of these people are gunning for partner, but won't be pushed out until they don't make it).

But, if you were to assume that attrition is constant at 20%, that implies out of a initial cohort of 100, the following amount would be left at the beginning of year:

2nd year: 80
3rd year: 64
4th year: 51
5th year: 41
6th year: 33
7th year: 26
8th year: 21
Partner/Counsel/9th year: 17


Attrition in NY, particularly among the firms with large classes, seems higher than in other firms/offices. Any sense of how hard it is to stick it out in a non-NY office (i.e. DC)?

User avatar
thesealocust
Posts: 8448
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2008 8:50 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby thesealocust » Sun May 12, 2013 12:21 am

Attrition can seem artificially high at some 'top' NY firms because they hire fewer (or even nearly zero) laterals.

Cravath doesn't replace the people it loses - many other firms do though, so their relatively smaller summer classes don't necessarily indicate a (correspondingly) smaller rate of attrition.

User avatar
Old Gregg
Posts: 5413
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:26 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Old Gregg » Sun May 12, 2013 1:20 am

Cravath doesn't replace the people it loses


They do. So does WLRK.

User avatar
thesealocust
Posts: 8448
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2008 8:50 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby thesealocust » Sun May 12, 2013 1:35 am

Fresh Prince wrote:
Cravath doesn't replace the people it loses


They do. So does WLRK.


Sigh.

http://www.cravath.com/hiringprocess/ wrote:When we interview candidates for employment as summer associates or associates, it is very much a two-way street. Particularly because we do not hire associates laterally. . .


Obviously there are exceptions (I know their grab of a Skadden BK partner around the financial crisis made waves), but you can't argue that firms like Cravath have different hiring and retention models than a lot of other firms. They rely somewhere between "much less heavily" and "not at all" on lateral hires relative to other large firms.

User avatar
Old Gregg
Posts: 5413
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:26 pm

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Old Gregg » Sun May 12, 2013 10:29 am

thesealocust wrote:
Fresh Prince wrote:
Cravath doesn't replace the people it loses


They do. So does WLRK.


Sigh.

http://www.cravath.com/hiringprocess/ wrote:When we interview candidates for employment as summer associates or associates, it is very much a two-way street. Particularly because we do not hire associates laterally. . .


Obviously there are exceptions (I know their grab of a Skadden BK partner around the financial crisis made waves), but you can't argue that firms like Cravath have different hiring and retention models than a lot of other firms. They rely somewhere between "much less heavily" and "not at all" on lateral hires relative to other large firms.


Yes, we all know what these firms say publicly. It's a bit different when you're actually getting headhunter calls for positions at WLRK and Cravath, which I (and many other associates do) get every once in a while.

Now whether it's partner track is s different story. Don't know about that. But the firms that purport not to take laterals definitely do if there's a need.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273582
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 12, 2013 1:14 pm

Not exactly the same question as OP, but related -- is there a "normal" amount/proportion of associates to leave each year? Or an average? I know how many fewer associates there were at my firm in 2012 as opposed to 2011, and I'm wondering if there's any way to tell whether these are stealth layoffs or just normal attrition.

Edit: I realize Chuck posted relevant info to this earlier, thanks. Interested to see any more.

User avatar
Tiago Splitter
Posts: 15524
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 1:20 am

Re: Attrition at V5 (NY)

Postby Tiago Splitter » Sun May 12, 2013 2:19 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Not exactly the same question as OP, but related -- is there a "normal" amount/proportion of associates to leave each year? Or an average? I know how many fewer associates there were at my firm in 2012 as opposed to 2011, and I'm wondering if there's any way to tell whether these are stealth layoffs or just normal attrition.

Edit: I realize Chuck posted relevant info to this earlier, thanks. Interested to see any more.

It's actually less than what many people think, although it might be higher than average for the V5. kappycaft1 got a copy of the NALP Associate Attrition Report and posted this in a different thread:

kappycaft1 wrote:Well, I finally got my hands on The NALP Foundation’s “2012 Update on Associate Attrition for Calendar Year 2011,” and I even made some kick-ass Google spreadsheets from the data, but I was denied access to share them by NALP. So… I am going to have to simply state points that I thought were interesting here. Before that, however, I would highly recommend that anyone who is considering going to law school read their report as it is literally a goldmine of information; it shows what percentage of associates (broken down into categories of new-hires, lateral hires, male, female, minority, etc.) leave what size firms and after how many years, as well as why they leave and where they end up going.

Synopsis:
Biglaw firms lost roughly 69% of their entry-level associates within the first 5 years, but only a quarter within the first 3 years. Apparently only about a quarter of the associate departures were desired by the law firms, whereas roughly half of the departures were unwanted (the remaining attrition was viewed neutrally). As for where the entry-level associates ended up after leaving their firms, slightly less than half moved to associate positions at other legal firms, and one-fifth of them moved in house with corporate counsels. Unfortunately, there is no way to tell how many of these associates that lateraled into other law firms went to a smaller firm (biglaw to midlaw, midlaw to shitlaw, etc.). Additionally, only 2% of departing associates went to judicial clerkships, and NALP doesn’t break this down into “type” of clerkship, so there is no way to tell how many of these were AIII clerkships, although we know it is a max of 2%. In conclusion, it looks like roughly 31% of entry-level associates are still with their firms after 5 years when it comes to the largest firms (501+ attorneys); this number is slightly higher for other large firms (101-250 attorneys). Of the 69% that leave, approximately 73% end up in decent legal employment such as law firm associate, law firm partner, judicial clerk, other governmental legal job, and corporate in-house counsel. Accordingly, 31% + 50% (73% of 69%) = 81% of entry-level associates are still in some sort of (presumably) decent legal position at the end of year 5.


http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/v ... &start=200




Return to “Legal Employment”

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.