Austin v. Houston

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Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 06, 2013 6:19 pm

OGI is coming around shortly, and I wanted to see if I could get anything going with this.

I am at MVP, top 10-15% after first semester (never know where it will go after this semester till grades come in). I will be at a couple Texas firms this summer.

I have some solid connections to Austin... UG, work experience, family, connections at one of Big 3 there, etc. My question is this. Would it be a mistake to go to Austin over Houston for one of the Big 3? (V&E or BB). Those offices are small, and after having spent much time there, I just cant imagine that those firms have a ton of Austin based work. I would love if someone had some info/insight that I am wrong. Would these smaller officer make partnership prospects worse? (I know its a crapshoot either way, but someone has to make it). Would it be correct to say that the better career move would be to go to Houston over Austin?

Any insight would be great.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby unlicensedpotato » Mon May 06, 2013 8:11 pm

.
Last edited by unlicensedpotato on Mon May 06, 2013 8:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby nonprofit-prophet » Mon May 06, 2013 8:16 pm

Anonymous User wrote:OGI is coming around shortly, and I wanted to see if I could get anything going with this.

I am at MVP, top 10-15% after first semester (never know where it will go after this semester till grades come in). I will be at a couple Texas firms this summer.

I have some solid connections to Austin... UG, work experience, family, connections at one of Big 3 there, etc. My question is this. Would it be a mistake to go to Austin over Houston for one of the Big 3? (V&E or BB). Those offices are small, and after having spent much time there, I just cant imagine that those firms have a ton of Austin based work. I would love if someone had some info/insight that I am wrong. Would these smaller officer make partnership prospects worse? (I know its a crapshoot either way, but someone has to make it). Would it be correct to say that the better career move would be to go to Houston over Austin?

Any insight would be great.


You can google past partnership press releases (probably a bunch to get a sense) to see how many partners are being homegrown (not laterals) out of the Houston and Austin offices to figure out if there is a difference in how they do their promoting.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby 005618502 » Mon May 06, 2013 8:28 pm

This is somewhat relevant to my interests. Here is my view, and someone please correct me if I am wrong:

It would be better for your "career" to start in Houston (if you are with the Big 3) simply because that is their home office, that is where the most work will be and that is where they will make the most partners (dont know if that increases your chances though). Though, Austin would be a better city to live in as it seems the downtown area is much more livable.

Also, another thing to consider is exit options. If you want to go from the Big 3 to another firm, you will have MANY more options in Austin. Also, there are many more F500 companies in Houston (Houston has lots, dont know if Austin has any besides 3M and Dell), so that would make it easier for in house.

I spent about 5 years in Austin, and am targeting Houston and Dallas rather than Austin for the reasons above

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 06, 2013 8:29 pm

unlicensedpotato wrote:.


OP here, come on, posted then deleted? :p

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 06, 2013 8:30 pm

AssumptionRequired wrote:This is somewhat relevant to my interests. Here is my view, and someone please correct me if I am wrong:

It would be better for your "career" to start in Houston (if you are with the Big 3) simply because that is their home office, that is where the most work will be and that is where they will make the most partners (dont know if that increases your chances though). Though, Austin would be a better city to live in as it seems the downtown area is much more livable.

Also, another thing to consider is exit options. If you want to go from the Big 3 to another firm, you will have MANY more options in Austin. Also, there are many more F500 companies in Houston (Houston has lots, dont know if Austin has any besides 3M and Dell), so that would make it easier for in house.

I spent about 5 years in Austin, and am targeting Houston and Dallas rather than Austin for the reasons above


This is along the lines of what I was worried about. Also curious how much corporate work can really be generated in Austin. I would imagine litigation may not be a huge difference, but transactional work might be

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby unlicensedpotato » Mon May 06, 2013 8:41 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
unlicensedpotato wrote:.


OP here, come on, posted then deleted? :p


Sorry, I was the worried the tone of it was too negative. I think conventional wisdom is that it will be easier to succeed professionally in Houston. But, the cities are so different to me. I would think you would have a strong opinion one way or the other just based on your personal views.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby nonprofit-prophet » Mon May 06, 2013 8:49 pm

Just throwing this out there: Dallas is somewhat of a middle ground. It has a bigger legal market than Austin and it's smaller than Houston so you can live in nice places within a 5-10 minute drive to the office (and less traffic). Some great firms in Dallas too. McKool, Susman, VE for corporate, Hayboo for appellate and bankruptcy, and Baker Botts for IP are all solid choices.

However, if you're set on Houston vs. Austin, I think Houston is the way to go for your career (especially of you're looking for transactional work). So much of what firms like VE do is generated from the Houston office. That's definitely where all the rainmakers are. I'd heard it's easier to make partner if you are able to consistently get work from the rainmakers in Houston (even if you're in another office, but obviously its easier to build those relationships if you're in Houston).

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 06, 2013 8:58 pm

unlicensedpotato wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
unlicensedpotato wrote:.


OP here, come on, posted then deleted? :p


Sorry, I was the worried the tone of it was too negative. I think conventional wisdom is that it will be easier to succeed professionally in Houston. But, the cities are so different to me. I would think you would have a strong opinion one way or the other just based on your personal views.


OP here. I gotcha. I dont think that this is really the case. I have lived all over the country throughout my life. I am more focused on my career and increasing my prospects at this point than I am what city I am in. I will agree having lived in both cities that they are very different though.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 06, 2013 9:00 pm

nonprofit-prophet wrote:Just throwing this out there: Dallas is somewhat of a middle ground. It has a bigger legal market than Austin and it's smaller than Houston so you can live in nice places within a 5-10 minute drive to the office (and less traffic). Some great firms in Dallas too. McKool, Susman, VE for corporate, Hayboo for appellate and bankruptcy, and Baker Botts for IP are all solid choices.

However, if you're set on Houston vs. Austin, I think Houston is the way to go for your career (especially of you're looking for transactional work). So much of what firms like VE do is generated from the Houston office. That's definitely where all the rainmakers are. I'd heard it's easier to make partner if you are able to consistently get work from the rainmakers in Houston (even if you're in another office, but obviously its easier to build those relationships if you're in Houston).


Yeah. My only worry about Dallas runs into the same heading. Would it be better to go to V&E Houston than V&E Dallas for the same reasons? I think Dallas is a great city, I was concerned that again there would be a lack of corporate work. Do you think V&E Dallas would be a better choice than Haynes and Boone if you are looking at M&A/Securities/general corporate work in Dallas?

Also, if I can get Susman, I would not think twice, do litigation, and never look back haha. I am semi-leaning corporate, but really this summer will help me figure that out.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby nonprofit-prophet » Mon May 06, 2013 9:01 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
unlicensedpotato wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
unlicensedpotato wrote:.


OP here, come on, posted then deleted? :p


Sorry, I was the worried the tone of it was too negative. I think conventional wisdom is that it will be easier to succeed professionally in Houston. But, the cities are so different to me. I would think you would have a strong opinion one way or the other just based on your personal views.


OP here. I gotcha. I dont think that this is really the case. I have lived all over the country throughout my life. I am more focused on my career and increasing my prospects at this point than I am what city I am in. I will agree having lived in both cities that they are very different though.


If that's the case, then definitely Houston.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby nonprofit-prophet » Mon May 06, 2013 9:02 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
nonprofit-prophet wrote:Just throwing this out there: Dallas is somewhat of a middle ground. It has a bigger legal market than Austin and it's smaller than Houston so you can live in nice places within a 5-10 minute drive to the office (and less traffic). Some great firms in Dallas too. McKool, Susman, VE for corporate, Hayboo for appellate and bankruptcy, and Baker Botts for IP are all solid choices.

However, if you're set on Houston vs. Austin, I think Houston is the way to go for your career (especially of you're looking for transactional work). So much of what firms like VE do is generated from the Houston office. That's definitely where all the rainmakers are. I'd heard it's easier to make partner if you are able to consistently get work from the rainmakers in Houston (even if you're in another office, but obviously its easier to build those relationships if you're in Houston).


Yeah. My only worry about Dallas runs into the same heading. Would it be better to go to V&E Houston than V&E Dallas for the same reasons? I think Dallas is a great city, I was concerned that again there would be a lack of corporate work. Do you think V&E Dallas would be a better choice than Haynes and Boone if you are looking at M&A/Securities/general corporate work in Dallas?

Also, if I can get Susman, I would not think twice, do litigation, and never look back haha. I am semi-leaning corporate, but really this summer will help me figure that out.


PM me.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 07, 2013 12:28 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
nonprofit-prophet wrote:Just throwing this out there: Dallas is somewhat of a middle ground. It has a bigger legal market than Austin and it's smaller than Houston so you can live in nice places within a 5-10 minute drive to the office (and less traffic). Some great firms in Dallas too. McKool, Susman, VE for corporate, Hayboo for appellate and bankruptcy, and Baker Botts for IP are all solid choices.

However, if you're set on Houston vs. Austin, I think Houston is the way to go for your career (especially of you're looking for transactional work). So much of what firms like VE do is generated from the Houston office. That's definitely where all the rainmakers are. I'd heard it's easier to make partner if you are able to consistently get work from the rainmakers in Houston (even if you're in another office, but obviously its easier to build those relationships if you're in Houston).


Yeah. My only worry about Dallas runs into the same heading. Would it be better to go to V&E Houston than V&E Dallas for the same reasons? I think Dallas is a great city, I was concerned that again there would be a lack of corporate work. Do you think V&E Dallas would be a better choice than Haynes and Boone if you are looking at M&A/Securities/general corporate work in Dallas?


I think the "best" Dallas corporate firms generally fall in to two categories. In terms of pure volume, it seems Haynes & Boone and V&E probably do the "most" corporate work. They each have a very wide range of practice groups. In terms of dollar amounts/high profile deals, its probably Weil and Gibson. I think Weil is probably a little ahead of Gibson, though Gibson may have the two best M&A/securities lawyers in Dallas (those two guys that left V&E). Of course, at firms like Weil and Gibson, your partnership chances are virtually nonexistent. Jones Day probably falls somewhere in between those two groups, though I have heard second hand that they don't do much Dallas based work. I think AK is also pretty well respected in the corporate market.

Best of luck.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby 005618502 » Tue May 07, 2013 1:53 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
nonprofit-prophet wrote:Just throwing this out there: Dallas is somewhat of a middle ground. It has a bigger legal market than Austin and it's smaller than Houston so you can live in nice places within a 5-10 minute drive to the office (and less traffic). Some great firms in Dallas too. McKool, Susman, VE for corporate, Hayboo for appellate and bankruptcy, and Baker Botts for IP are all solid choices.

However, if you're set on Houston vs. Austin, I think Houston is the way to go for your career (especially of you're looking for transactional work). So much of what firms like VE do is generated from the Houston office. That's definitely where all the rainmakers are. I'd heard it's easier to make partner if you are able to consistently get work from the rainmakers in Houston (even if you're in another office, but obviously its easier to build those relationships if you're in Houston).


Yeah. My only worry about Dallas runs into the same heading. Would it be better to go to V&E Houston than V&E Dallas for the same reasons? I think Dallas is a great city, I was concerned that again there would be a lack of corporate work. Do you think V&E Dallas would be a better choice than Haynes and Boone if you are looking at M&A/Securities/general corporate work in Dallas?


I think the "best" Dallas corporate firms generally fall in to two categories. In terms of pure volume, it seems Haynes & Boone and V&E probably do the "most" corporate work. They each have a very wide range of practice groups. In terms of dollar amounts/high profile deals, its probably Weil and Gibson. I think Weil is probably a little ahead of Gibson, though Gibson may have the two best M&A/securities lawyers in Dallas (those two guys that left V&E). Of course, at firms like Weil and Gibson, your partnership chances are virtually nonexistent. Jones Day probably falls somewhere in between those two groups, though I have heard second hand that they don't do much Dallas based work. I think AK is also pretty well respected in the corporate market.

Best of luck.


This is interesting, I didnt know that Gibson had such a good corporate group... I thought that they were primarily a litigation powerhouse and their corporate was kind of a second thought. I will agree on the Weil lack of partnership prospects though, seems close to impossible there. Where do all their corporate attorneys go? Is it easy for them to move to another firm? Or do they mostly cut away from firms and move in with a client/in-house after a couple years?

OP I would say that Houston would be the better bet if you wanted corporate. Between V&E, Latham and AK in Houston its hard to say it would be best to go somewhere else for corporate
Last edited by 005618502 on Tue May 07, 2013 1:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 07, 2013 1:54 pm

In my opinion, you should follow your connections and go to Austin. Most people don't end up in Austin because it's a tough market to crack. But you have the grades and the ties that will make that doable for you.

The only thing that would change my opinion on this is if you have a burning desire to work in energy or work on huge M&As. If that's the case, go to Houston.

Austin does have smaller offices, which reflects that fact that it's a smaller city with fewer businesses. But there is still a lot of work. The semiconductor industry is huge in Austin, as are spin-offs from research at UT and other tech businesses. There is plenty of transactional work being done. Austin offices aren't leaned on heavily when [insert huge oil/exploration/pipeline co] acquires or spins off a division/assets/whatever, but they have plenty of work.

Moreover, and as you probably well know, Austin is a nicer location to live in if you have $. Just about every UT law student would kill to be able to stay here.

- UT Law guy

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby 005618502 » Tue May 07, 2013 2:06 pm

Anonymous User wrote:In my opinion, you should follow your connections and go to Austin. Most people don't end up in Austin because it's a tough market to crack. But you have the grades and the ties that will make that doable for you.

The only thing that would change my opinion on this is if you have a burning desire to work in energy or work on huge M&As. If that's the case, go to Houston.

Austin does have smaller offices, which reflects that fact that it's a smaller city with fewer businesses. But there is still a lot of work. The semiconductor industry is huge in Austin, as are spin-offs from research at UT and other tech businesses. There is plenty of transactional work being done. Austin offices aren't leaned on heavily when [insert huge oil/exploration/pipeline co] acquires or spins off a division/assets/whatever, but they have plenty of work.

Moreover, and as you probably well know, Austin is a nicer location to live in if you have $. Just about every UT law student would kill to be able to stay here.

- UT Law guy


I might have agreed with this until you said just about every UT law student would kill to stay in Austin. I know tons of people at UT law, more than a handful have 3.8+ gpas and all but one wanted to get out of Austin because of the lack of deals/work size. I lived in Austin for a long time and will admit its a cool place to live, but there are times in your life where you should think about your career. This is what you will be doing 10+ hours a day for the rest of your life, if you want to work on big deals, you dont want Austin.

Also, what about exit options in Austin? When you leave Baker Botts, V&E, Fulbright, etc... where do you go? I dont know of many companies that have in house spots there. Unless you are in lit and want to go work for the government (I would never want to do that, personally) there doesnt appear to be many options.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 07, 2013 2:17 pm

AssumptionRequired wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
nonprofit-prophet wrote:Just throwing this out there: Dallas is somewhat of a middle ground. It has a bigger legal market than Austin and it's smaller than Houston so you can live in nice places within a 5-10 minute drive to the office (and less traffic). Some great firms in Dallas too. McKool, Susman, VE for corporate, Hayboo for appellate and bankruptcy, and Baker Botts for IP are all solid choices.

However, if you're set on Houston vs. Austin, I think Houston is the way to go for your career (especially of you're looking for transactional work). So much of what firms like VE do is generated from the Houston office. That's definitely where all the rainmakers are. I'd heard it's easier to make partner if you are able to consistently get work from the rainmakers in Houston (even if you're in another office, but obviously its easier to build those relationships if you're in Houston).


Yeah. My only worry about Dallas runs into the same heading. Would it be better to go to V&E Houston than V&E Dallas for the same reasons? I think Dallas is a great city, I was concerned that again there would be a lack of corporate work. Do you think V&E Dallas would be a better choice than Haynes and Boone if you are looking at M&A/Securities/general corporate work in Dallas?


I think the "best" Dallas corporate firms generally fall in to two categories. In terms of pure volume, it seems Haynes & Boone and V&E probably do the "most" corporate work. They each have a very wide range of practice groups. In terms of dollar amounts/high profile deals, its probably Weil and Gibson. I think Weil is probably a little ahead of Gibson, though Gibson may have the two best M&A/securities lawyers in Dallas (those two guys that left V&E). Of course, at firms like Weil and Gibson, your partnership chances are virtually nonexistent. Jones Day probably falls somewhere in between those two groups, though I have heard second hand that they don't do much Dallas based work. I think AK is also pretty well respected in the corporate market.

Best of luck.


This is interesting, I didnt know that Gibson had such a good corporate group... I thought that they were primarily a litigation powerhouse and their corporate was kind of a second thought.


I think that was probably true prior to the V&E guys moving to Gibson a few years ago. They also just added Ron Kirk, though it remains to be seen how much of the tangible impact that will actually have in terms of bringing in clients.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 07, 2013 2:30 pm

AssumptionRequired wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:In my opinion, you should follow your connections and go to Austin. Most people don't end up in Austin because it's a tough market to crack. But you have the grades and the ties that will make that doable for you.

The only thing that would change my opinion on this is if you have a burning desire to work in energy or work on huge M&As. If that's the case, go to Houston.

Austin does have smaller offices, which reflects that fact that it's a smaller city with fewer businesses. But there is still a lot of work. The semiconductor industry is huge in Austin, as are spin-offs from research at UT and other tech businesses. There is plenty of transactional work being done. Austin offices aren't leaned on heavily when [insert huge oil/exploration/pipeline co] acquires or spins off a division/assets/whatever, but they have plenty of work.

Moreover, and as you probably well know, Austin is a nicer location to live in if you have $. Just about every UT law student would kill to be able to stay here.

- UT Law guy


I might have agreed with this until you said just about every UT law student would kill to stay in Austin. I know tons of people at UT law, more than a handful have 3.8+ gpas and all but one wanted to get out of Austin because of the lack of deals/work size. I lived in Austin for a long time and will admit its a cool place to live, but there are times in your life where you should think about your career. This is what you will be doing 10+ hours a day for the rest of your life, if you want to work on big deals, you dont want Austin.

Also, what about exit options in Austin? When you leave Baker Botts, V&E, Fulbright, etc... where do you go? I dont know of many companies that have in house spots there. Unless you are in lit and want to go work for the government (I would never want to do that, personally) there doesnt appear to be many options.


Well, that depends on what you want out of your career. Like I said, if OP has a burning desire to work on huge deals, then OP ought to go to Houston. If OP is fine chilling in the top quintile of earners for the rest of OP's working life and doing interesting work that isn't necessarily going to get OP's name in The American Lawyer, Austin is a great place to work.

There are a lot of smaller firms that have offices in Austin. And there are a lot of companies that have in-house lawyers in Austin. Yes, it will be difficult to become an AGC at Exxon if you start your career in Austin. And if that's what OP wants, OP should probably go to Houston or Dallas. But if OP doesn't have a prestige hard-on, Austin is a great place to live and work as a lawyer. Moreover, OP has connections here. Connections go a hell of a long way for building business later on down the road.

For a list of companies based in Austin: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:C ... tin,_Texas ... some of the bigger names include Freescale Semiconductor, Dell, GSD&M, & Temple-Inland. Moreover, many smaller businesses aren't scaled so as to have big in-house rosters. But that doesn't mean they aren't transacting business that requires attorney help.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 07, 2013 3:07 pm

.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Tue May 07, 2013 3:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby prs362 » Tue May 07, 2013 3:12 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
AssumptionRequired wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:In my opinion, you should follow your connections and go to Austin. Most people don't end up in Austin because it's a tough market to crack. But you have the grades and the ties that will make that doable for you.

The only thing that would change my opinion on this is if you have a burning desire to work in energy or work on huge M&As. If that's the case, go to Houston.

Austin does have smaller offices, which reflects that fact that it's a smaller city with fewer businesses. But there is still a lot of work. The semiconductor industry is huge in Austin, as are spin-offs from research at UT and other tech businesses. There is plenty of transactional work being done. Austin offices aren't leaned on heavily when [insert huge oil/exploration/pipeline co] acquires or spins off a division/assets/whatever, but they have plenty of work.

Moreover, and as you probably well know, Austin is a nicer location to live in if you have $. Just about every UT law student would kill to be able to stay here.

- UT Law guy


I might have agreed with this until you said just about every UT law student would kill to stay in Austin. I know tons of people at UT law, more than a handful have 3.8+ gpas and all but one wanted to get out of Austin because of the lack of deals/work size. I lived in Austin for a long time and will admit its a cool place to live, but there are times in your life where you should think about your career. This is what you will be doing 10+ hours a day for the rest of your life, if you want to work on big deals, you dont want Austin.

Also, what about exit options in Austin? When you leave Baker Botts, V&E, Fulbright, etc... where do you go? I dont know of many companies that have in house spots there. Unless you are in lit and want to go work for the government (I would never want to do that, personally) there doesnt appear to be many options.


Agree with Assumption. UT UG and UT Law 1L here. What are the exit options in Austin? Houston you have oil & gas companies. Dallas you have headquarters of about 1 bazillion F500 companies. Any UT Law student who "would kill to be able to stay here" is either a weirdo hippie or sadly misinformed.
Further, just as a city: What do you do at age 30 in Austin? Go out to Rainey and West 6th? The people who are still doing that at 25 already come off as creepy scumbags. It's a college town. Move on when you have a real job. Of course, I never liked Austin in the first place, so take this with a grain of salt.


You've spent 5 years in Austin and you're under the impression that all there is to do is get drunk at bars?

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 07, 2013 3:14 pm

.

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Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby 005618502 » Tue May 07, 2013 3:26 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
AssumptionRequired wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:In my opinion, you should follow your connections and go to Austin. Most people don't end up in Austin because it's a tough market to crack. But you have the grades and the ties that will make that doable for you.

The only thing that would change my opinion on this is if you have a burning desire to work in energy or work on huge M&As. If that's the case, go to Houston.

Austin does have smaller offices, which reflects that fact that it's a smaller city with fewer businesses. But there is still a lot of work. The semiconductor industry is huge in Austin, as are spin-offs from research at UT and other tech businesses. There is plenty of transactional work being done. Austin offices aren't leaned on heavily when [insert huge oil/exploration/pipeline co] acquires or spins off a division/assets/whatever, but they have plenty of work.

Moreover, and as you probably well know, Austin is a nicer location to live in if you have $. Just about every UT law student would kill to be able to stay here.

- UT Law guy


I might have agreed with this until you said just about every UT law student would kill to stay in Austin. I know tons of people at UT law, more than a handful have 3.8+ gpas and all but one wanted to get out of Austin because of the lack of deals/work size. I lived in Austin for a long time and will admit its a cool place to live, but there are times in your life where you should think about your career. This is what you will be doing 10+ hours a day for the rest of your life, if you want to work on big deals, you dont want Austin.

Also, what about exit options in Austin? When you leave Baker Botts, V&E, Fulbright, etc... where do you go? I dont know of many companies that have in house spots there. Unless you are in lit and want to go work for the government (I would never want to do that, personally) there doesnt appear to be many options.


Agree with Assumption. UT UG and UT Law 1L here. What are the exit options in Austin? Houston you have oil & gas companies. Dallas you have headquarters of about 1 bazillion F500 companies. Any UT Law student who "would kill to be able to stay here" is either a weirdo hippie or sadly misinformed.
Further, just as a city: What do you do at age 30 in Austin? Go out to Rainey and West 6th? The people who are still doing that at 25 already come off as creepy scumbags. It's a college town. Move on when you have a real job. Of course, I never liked Austin in the first place, so take this with a grain of salt.


I spent a long time in Austin, including working there prior to law school and I (kind of) agree. I had a couple friends who were 30ish who would still be going to West 5th (so as to avoid 6th) and stuff and it just seemed weird at times. Then again, they were just personal trainers doing it to find hook ups, so very different.

I like Austin, but I dont think I would like it more than Dallas. The only downside to Houston, in my opinion, is the fact that it is so much more humid than Dallas.

Do people think the exit options in Dallas would be better than Houston simply because of the number of F500 companies there?

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Richie Tenenbaum
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Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 6:17 am

Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby Richie Tenenbaum » Tue May 07, 2013 3:40 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Agree with Assumption. UT UG and UT Law 1L here. What are the exit options in Austin? Houston you have oil & gas companies. Dallas you have headquarters of about 1 bazillion F500 companies. Any UT Law student who "would kill to be able to stay here" is either a weirdo hippie or sadly misinformed.
Further, just as a city: What do you do at age 30 in Austin? Go out to Rainey and West 6th? The people who are still doing that at 25 already come off as creepy scumbags. It's a college town. Move on when you have a real job. Of course, I never liked Austin in the first place, so take this with a grain of salt.


3L at UT. I and a lot of people I know would love to stay in Austin, even if the work isn't as good. I don't think this group includes many "weirdo hippies" or people who are sadly misinformed. I know a decent amount of people with good grades who wanted Austin, but had to settle for a bigger market.

If you don't know what to do in Austin besides go drinking on 6th, that's your fault. Maybe try to fix that in your final two years in Austin.

AssumptionRequired wrote:I spent a long time in Austin, including working there prior to law school and I (kind of) agree. I had a couple friends who were 30ish who would still be going to West 5th (so as to avoid 6th) and stuff and it just seemed weird at times. Then again, they were just personal trainers doing it to find hook ups, so very different.

I like Austin, but I dont think I would like it more than Dallas. The only downside to Houston, in my opinion, is the fact that it is so much more humid than Dallas.

Do people think the exit options in Dallas would be better than Houston simply because of the number of F500 companies there?


I like Dallas, but I think Austin is just simply better. But yeah, work and probably exit opportunities will be better in Dallas or Houston. As for Houston versus Dallas, I think it's important to consider if there's a home office involved. The big three are based in Houston and their Houston offices are going to be better for these sorts of things than their Dallas offices.
Last edited by Richie Tenenbaum on Tue May 07, 2013 4:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

005618502
Posts: 2577
Joined: Thu May 06, 2010 10:56 pm

Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby 005618502 » Tue May 07, 2013 3:46 pm

Richie Tenenbaum wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Agree with Assumption. UT UG and UT Law 1L here. What are the exit options in Austin? Houston you have oil & gas companies. Dallas you have headquarters of about 1 bazillion F500 companies. Any UT Law student who "would kill to be able to stay here" is either a weirdo hippie or sadly misinformed.
Further, just as a city: What do you do at age 30 in Austin? Go out to Rainey and West 6th? The people who are still doing that at 25 already come off as creepy scumbags. It's a college town. Move on when you have a real job. Of course, I never liked Austin in the first place, so take this with a grain of salt.


3L at UT. I and a lot of people I know would love to stay in Austin, even if the work isn't as good. I don't think this group includes many "weirdo hippies" or people who are sadly misinformed. I know a decent amount of people with good grades who wanted Austin, but had to settle for a bigger market.

If you don't know what to do in Austin besides go drinking on 6th, that's your fault. Maybe try to fix in your final two years in Austin.

AssumptionRequired wrote:I spent a long time in Austin, including working there prior to law school and I (kind of) agree. I had a couple friends who were 30ish who would still be going to West 5th (so as to avoid 6th) and stuff and it just seemed weird at times. Then again, they were just personal trainers doing it to find hook ups, so very different.

I like Austin, but I dont think I would like it more than Dallas. The only downside to Houston, in my opinion, is the fact that it is so much more humid than Dallas.

Do people think the exit options in Dallas would be better than Houston simply because of the number of F500 companies there?


I like Dallas, but I think Austin is just simply better. But yeah, work and probably exit opportunities will be better in Dallas or Houston. As for Houston versus Dallas, I think it's important to consider if there's a home office involved. The big three are based in Houston and their Houston offices are going to be better for these sorts of things than their Dallas offices.


re: staying in Austin, I think it just has to do with preferences. Everyone looks for different things in life. I for one worry more about my career/making money than the activities I do or city in which I live.

Would you take Haynes Boone over one of the big 3 in Dallas? That is the hard part, how much emphasis to put on whether its the headquarters. Like I think Houston it would be best to go to Big 3/AK, Bracewell/Latham(even though they are not headquartered in Houston) than a LL or Haynes Boone houston office. But does this apply to Dallas? Is HB like the place to go there? Seems hard because the pay is so much lower than Weil, V&E, BB (all on NYC pay).

Also, where the heck is Lathams HQ? lol Cant figure out if its NYC or LA

nonprofit-prophet
Posts: 844
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 11:10 am

Re: Austin v. Houston

Postby nonprofit-prophet » Tue May 07, 2013 4:42 pm

AssumptionRequired wrote:
re: staying in Austin, I think it just has to do with preferences. Everyone looks for different things in life. I for one worry more about my career/making money than the activities I do or city in which I live.

Would you take Haynes Boone over one of the big 3 in Dallas? That is the hard part, how much emphasis to put on whether its the headquarters. Like I think Houston it would be best to go to Big 3/AK, Bracewell/Latham(even though they are not headquartered in Houston) than a LL or Haynes Boone houston office. But does this apply to Dallas? Is HB like the place to go there? Seems hard because the pay is so much lower than Weil, V&E, BB (all on NYC pay).

Also, where the heck is Lathams HQ? lol Cant figure out if its NYC or LA



I think there's a thread from last summer about Dallas based firms vs Houston satellites in Dallas. I think it really comes down to the practice group that you are looking for. VE is probably the best of the big three in Dallas (unless you want IP, then BB is the best of the big three for that). VE vs HB is tough, but I'd probably go with VE unless I wanted bankruptcy or appellate work. Culture should probably be factored in as well, since they are very different firms in that respect (but thats a personal calculation).




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