First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

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v20lawyer
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby v20lawyer » Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:44 pm

Objection wrote:
v20lawyer wrote:
Objection wrote:
Your only legal contact with the outside world is those briefs. Court sees it, media sees it, clients see it.

What the partner thinks only matters if you want to make partner, and pleasing the partner and getting credit aren't mutually exclusive anyway.


You're clueless. It's one thing to complain about biglaw, and there are a lot of things to complain about, but this is just ridiculous.


And you're just wrong because you don't understand the value of marketing yourself, even incrementally.



Go ahead and explain what type of business that signature is going to bring in. If a client is clueless enough to hire you because your name is the 7th signature on a brief in a major case, guess what, the signature isn't necessary.

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Objection
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Objection » Tue Mar 19, 2013 2:45 pm

v20lawyer wrote:
Objection wrote:
v20lawyer wrote:
Objection wrote:
Your only legal contact with the outside world is those briefs. Court sees it, media sees it, clients see it.

What the partner thinks only matters if you want to make partner, and pleasing the partner and getting credit aren't mutually exclusive anyway.


You're clueless. It's one thing to complain about biglaw, and there are a lot of things to complain about, but this is just ridiculous.


And you're just wrong because you don't understand the value of marketing yourself, even incrementally.



Go ahead and explain what type of business that signature is going to bring in. If a client is clueless enough to hire you because your name is the 7th signature on a brief in a major case, guess what, the signature isn't necessary.


I see you've conveniently ignored the question I posed to you the first time I responded, the answer to which would answer your question.

v20lawyer
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby v20lawyer » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:00 pm

Objection wrote:
I see you've conveniently ignored the question I posed to you the first time I responded, the answer to which would answer your question.


I'm not going to go back through all this nonsense looking for whatever question you're talking about. If you want to pose it again feel free, but I don't really care. The answer to my question is that signature isn't going help you bring in business in any meaningful way, and certainly not to to the degree where not getting the signature is worth crying about and pissing away all the opportunity that can come from biglaw.

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Objection
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Objection » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:06 pm

v20lawyer wrote:
Objection wrote:
I see you've conveniently ignored the question I posed to you the first time I responded, the answer to which would answer your question.


I'm not going to go back through all this nonsense looking for whatever question you're talking about. If you want to pose it again feel free, but I don't really care. The answer to my question is that signature isn't going help you bring in business in any meaningful way, and certainly not to to the degree where not getting the signature is worth crying about and pissing away all the opportunity that can come from biglaw.


:lol: :lol: :lol:

All the opportunity.

Don't worry, big law bro, I'll still be your friend when your V20 pulls the rug out from under you.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:28 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:How long can you last of you truly, deeply give no fucks?

I don't mean doing bad work, but I mean if you say no to "requests" that you help on something and not being a properly deferential underling. E.g. Partner A, after you've done a few deals with him , that you are too busy to meet his Monday morning deadline, knowing that he will never give you anymore work, since you can always suck up to Partner B, who you never met before.

Eventually your internal reputation catches up with you, and you are let go. But it seems that institutional inertia, bull shit excuses, and they fact that law firms don't seem very well-managed, might buy you enough pay checks (18-24 months) to get you some serious seed money. (I have no student debt)


Any thoughts?


This is also my question. I have no debt. In fact I made money while in law school. I have a Big Law SA and just want to collect some pay checks before they kick me out. How long can I get by in Big Law without volunteering for anything and just doing my work. I plan on transitioning to another field entirely where my JD is just preferred so I could care less about lateral opportunites which would require me to do as much high skill work as possible. Could I make it three years if I don't rock the boat?

Also I want to thank SBL and Objection. The discussion between you two has been great. It's nice to see people with drasticly different opinions argue on TLS without resorting to snarky comments or name calling. I think it's great that you both laid out two valid points and defended them. I actually learned something from this thread.

Let me prefix this by stating that this advice in no way applies to your summer associate gig. Everyone--every single law student alive--should take a summer associate job if they can get one. It's an insane amount of money for a summer's worth of easy work, free booze, and sailing trips. There's just no good reason not to do it.

But I'd think long and hard about whether you actually want to work for a big law firm if you really, truly don't care. The money's great, but it's not going to be great enough to make you last even 1-2 years unless you're at least interested in your practice group's work (even if you hate doc review). Even the people that bitch about biglaw life generally care about the practice of law and can find a way to be interested in what they're doing a lot of the time. Life's too short to go into a job knowing from the word "go" that it has absolutely zero chance of leaving you fulfilled in any meaningful way.

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ph5354a
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby ph5354a » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:36 pm

Thanks to all of the associates contributing here. The conversations here have definitely made me think twice about what my other options will be if big law doesn't work out, and how I will be able to handle my loan payments if i have to use one of those other options. I apologize if any of these have been addressed already:

1) When people say they work 10 or 12 hour days 7 days a week, does that mean on average in a week, or that they have to be in the office 7 days/week regardless? i.e. if I wanted to work 12-14 hour days Monday-Saturday in order to have Sunday off, would that fly as long as nothing new came up?

2) Trivial matter: what do you feed yourself during these 14 hour marathon sessions? I'm assuming all eating takes place at your desk. Does anyone actually have their shit together enough to bring in food from home or are you surviving exclusively on take out?

3) OP mentioned trying to observe the interactions among associates/partners as much as possible during SA. Any other advice for how to use SA to determine if the firm is a good fit and/or how miserable you're going to be? I've heard that the workload during SA is sort of a joke.

4) How brutal is the holiday schedule? Should I expect to get emails on Christmas, New Year's Eve at 11:58, etc.? Similarly, how do people handle the occasional doctor's appointment, sick day, etc.?

ETA: 5) Were any of you going into a particular field of law that you were interested in beforehand (I'm interested in intl. trade)? Did that make the brutal hours more bearable, or did you find yourself hating the job regardless of the specialty?

Thanks again!
Last edited by ph5354a on Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Objection
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Objection » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:43 pm

ph5354a wrote:Thanks to all of the associates contributing here. The conversations here have definitely made me think twice about what my other options will be if big law doesn't work out, and how I will be able to handle my loan payments if i have to use one of those other options. I apologize if any of these have been addressed already:

1) When people say they work 10 or 12 hour days 7 days a week, does that mean on average in a week, or that they have to be in the office 7 days/week regardless? i.e. if I wanted to work 12-14 hour days Monday-Saturday in order to have Sunday off, would that fly as long as nothing new came up?


Depends on how well you set boundaries.

A co-worker of mine was in the office for ~65 of 72 hours during a 3 day period. During his first month.

If you have to work on Sunday, you have to work on Sunday. If you billed 14 hours Monday-Saturday, but something comes up on Sunday, you're SOL.

2) Trivial matter: what do you feed yourself during these 14 hour marathon sessions? I'm assuming all eating takes place at your desk. Does anyone actually have their shit together enough to bring in food from home or are you surviving exclusively on take out?


You can probably bring food from home easily enough if you make it before bed, or get a crockpot and throw a bunch in before you leave for work.

3) OP mentioned trying to observe the interactions among associates/partners as much as possible during SA. Any other advice for how to use SA to determine if the firm is a good fit and/or how miserable you're going to be? I've heard that the workload during SA is sort of a joke.


Visit the office at about 8 or 9 PM on random nights throughout the summer and see how many people are there.

Check how many associates have rings on their finger or pictures of a family on their desk.

4) How brutal is the holiday schedule? Should I expect to get emails on Christmas, New Year's Eve at 11:58, etc.? Similarly, how do people handle the occasional doctor's appointment, sick day, etc.?


You gotta work when you gotta work. Remember, clients will try and get their end done before holidays so they can go on vacation, and then it's your turn to start working. I knew quite a few people who worked over both Thanksgiving and Christmas this past year.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:45 pm

ph5354a wrote:Thanks to all of the associates contributing here. The conversations here have definitely made me think twice about what my other options will be if big law doesn't work out, and how I will be able to handle my loan payments if i have to use one of those other options. I apologize if any of these have been addressed already:

1) When people say they work 10 or 12 hour days 7 days a week, does that mean on average in a week, or that they have to be in the office 7 days/week regardless? i.e. if I wanted to work 12-14 hour days Monday-Saturday in order to have Sunday off, would that fly as long as nothing new came up?

2) Trivial matter: what do you feed yourself during these 14 hour marathon sessions? I'm assuming all eating takes place at your desk. Does anyone actually have their shit together enough to bring in food from home or are you surviving exclusively on take out?

3) OP mentioned trying to observe the interactions among associates/partners as much as possible during SA. Any other advice for how to use SA to determine if the firm is a good fit and/or how miserable you're going to be? I've heard that the workload during SA is sort of a joke.

4) How brutal is the holiday schedule? Should I expect to get emails on Christmas, New Year's Eve at 11:58, etc.? Similarly, how do people handle the occasional doctor's appointment, sick day, etc.?

Thanks again!

I work long hours, but I'm also cheap and lazy, so a very high percentage of my meals are eaten at my desk. I have cleared off a small shelf of vestigial West's reporters in my office and created what my coworkers (I assume lovingly) refer to as my "bomb shelter." Go on Amazon Prime (oh, by the way, if you're working at a firm or doing any other high-hours job, you're going to need to get Amazon Prime because free time is at a premium, and being able to do your shopping in 30 seconds from your computer will save you 2 hours of sweet, sweet free time. Prime is honestly the best $80 I've ever spent.) and get yourself a bunch of tuna, crackers, canned chicken (don't knock this until you try it with hot sauce on a cracker bro), and canned peaches (get the no sugar added kind, 'beetus is a bad look). I spend pretty much 0 prep time, maybe $2-3/day, and get all the brotein I can handle. I also recommend getting a 5-pound tub of whey powder and a few shaker cups to keep around the office. This will telegraph to the male associates that you are alpha (essential, since you're not generally allowed to wear tank tops to work unless you're at Quinn) and will awaken in the female associates (or, if you're lucky, partners) a primal desire, deeply seeded by evolution itself, to carry your seed.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:49 pm

What if almost everyone has a ring on their finger and a family including young associates? Does that really mean anything? What if you don't want a family? Does that mean you're going to get squeezed out by not being in the "family/SO" crowd? From what I've seen, it seem like everyone at BigLaw events seems to have some type of SO and it's almost expected at fancy dinners and the like.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:53 pm

Anonymous User wrote:What if almost everyone has a ring on their finger and a family including young associates? Does that really mean anything? What if you don't want a family? Does that mean you're going to get squeezed out by not being in the "family/SO" crowd? From what I've seen, it seem like everyone at BigLaw events seems to have some type of SO and it's almost expected at fancy dinners and the like.

This is generally a good sign. People with kids want to get home to their families, not spend all night in the office.

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ph5354a
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby ph5354a » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:56 pm

Objection wrote:
You gotta work when you gotta work. Remember, clients will try and get their end done before holidays so they can go on vacation, and then it's your turn to start working. I knew quite a few people who worked over both Thanksgiving and Christmas this past year.


This is all very helpful --thanks. For your experience/observations, does this horrid holiday work (i mean actually on Christmas/Thanksgiving Day, not expecting to get a whole week off or anything), take place in the office, or remotely? I saw the convo regarding remote work in general, but is there greater flexibility in this regard during the holidays?

I also recommend getting a 5-pound tub of whey powder and a few shaker cups to keep around the office. This will telegraph to the male associates that you are alpha (essential, since you're not generally allowed to wear tank tops to work unless you're at Quinn) and will awaken in the female associates (or, if you're lucky, partners) a primal desire, deeply seeded by evolution itself, to carry your seed.


+a million to the Amazon Prime. Also, I'm a straight female, so I'm not too concerned with females wanting to carry my seed (though I do tend to send off a masculine vibe in TLS for some reason), but it does sound like you have quite the epic bomb shelter lined up. Follow-up: is there generally a decent kitchen/fridge situation going on to keep food in?

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Objection
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Objection » Tue Mar 19, 2013 3:57 pm

Anonymous User wrote:What if almost everyone has a ring on their finger and a family including young associates? Does that really mean anything? What if you don't want a family? Does that mean you're going to get squeezed out by not being in the "family/SO" crowd? From what I've seen, it seem like everyone at BigLaw events seems to have some type of SO and it's almost expected at fancy dinners and the like.


I think it'd be a good proxy for lifestyle.

Also, lol@thinking the women with the men at big law events are necessarily their wives.

This is all very helpful --thanks. For your experience/observations, does this horrid holiday work (i mean actually on Christmas/Thanksgiving Day, not expecting to get a whole week off or anything), take place in the office, or remotely? I saw the convo regarding remote work in general, but is there greater flexibility in this regard during the holidays?


Depends on the work, to be totally honest.

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danitt
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby danitt » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:00 pm

Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Objection » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:07 pm

danitt wrote:Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.


I'm not entirely comfortable answering this, because I'm not a woman. What I can say is that it's really firm dependent. Big law is, unfortunately, still very much an old boys club. Some firms are better than others.

I don't think not wanting the picket fence will have any impact on you beyond the impact that being a woman in big law has. If anything, I'd guess that not wanting the picket fence will give you an advantage when compared to women who do want it.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:29 pm

danitt wrote:Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.

Why in the world would intending to focus entirely on your career and not taking maternity leave or other long family-related absences be a negative? If women are at a disadvantage in law firms and other high-pressure work environments, it's probably precisely because most of them have goals (family, etc.) and demands on their time you're not interested in. Are you so accustomed to conceptualizing yourself as a victim that you just assume every aspect of yourself is a disadvantage?

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Old Gregg » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:32 pm

Objection wrote:
v20lawyer wrote:
Objection wrote:
I see you've conveniently ignored the question I posed to you the first time I responded, the answer to which would answer your question.


I'm not going to go back through all this nonsense looking for whatever question you're talking about. If you want to pose it again feel free, but I don't really care. The answer to my question is that signature isn't going help you bring in business in any meaningful way, and certainly not to to the degree where not getting the signature is worth crying about and pissing away all the opportunity that can come from biglaw.


:lol: :lol: :lol:

All the opportunity.

Don't worry, big law bro, I'll still be your friend when your V20 pulls the rug out from under you.


:roll:

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danitt
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby danitt » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:36 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
danitt wrote:Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.

Why in the world would intending to focus entirely on your career and not taking maternity leave or other long family-related absences be a negative? If women are at a disadvantage in law firms and other high-pressure work environments, it's probably precisely because most of them have goals (family, etc.) and demands on their time you're not interested in. Are you so accustomed to conceptualizing yourself as a victim that you just assume every aspect of yourself is a disadvantage?

People use anonymous posting to say the dumbest shit.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:38 pm

danitt wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
danitt wrote:Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.

Why in the world would intending to focus entirely on your career and not taking maternity leave or other long family-related absences be a negative? If women are at a disadvantage in law firms and other high-pressure work environments, it's probably precisely because most of them have goals (family, etc.) and demands on their time you're not interested in. Are you so accustomed to conceptualizing yourself as a victim that you just assume every aspect of yourself is a disadvantage?

People use anonymous posting to say the dumbest shit.

Is there a better answer to "Will focusing myself on my career and not taking maternity leave hurt me at work?"

Your question is basically "Will the meter maid write me a ticket if I feed the parking meter an extra quarter?"

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A. Nony Mouse
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:39 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
danitt wrote:Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.

Why in the world would intending to focus entirely on your career and not taking maternity leave or other long family-related absences be a negative? If women are at a disadvantage in law firms and other high-pressure work environments, it's probably precisely because most of them have goals (family, etc.) and demands on their time you're not interested in. Are you so accustomed to conceptualizing yourself as a victim that you just assume every aspect of yourself is a disadvantage?

Eh, this is kind of unfair. On the one hand, yes, not wanting the family stuff that firms discriminate against women for should be an advantage in a high-pressure work environment. But women who don't want family & picket fence also often get judged for not fitting the "proper" mold for women - in society, generally, but also in the workplace. (See whichever employment discrimination case it was, where the woman won because she didn't get promoted despite excellent performance because she was too "aggressive" and "masculine." I'm blanking on the exact details/name, but it's a famous case.) Rock, meet hard place.

I mean, maybe no biglaw firm actually does that and they all love the unmarried unparenting associate of whatever gender. But it's not an outrageous question to ask whether firms also like their attorneys to present a particular image that often involves family life. (It may not be an issue in biglaw, but I can't tell you how many local firms have marital status and number of children in their attorneys' bios.)

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Mar 19, 2013 4:45 pm

A. Nony Mouse wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
danitt wrote:Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.

Why in the world would intending to focus entirely on your career and not taking maternity leave or other long family-related absences be a negative? If women are at a disadvantage in law firms and other high-pressure work environments, it's probably precisely because most of them have goals (family, etc.) and demands on their time you're not interested in. Are you so accustomed to conceptualizing yourself as a victim that you just assume every aspect of yourself is a disadvantage?

Eh, this is kind of unfair. On the one hand, yes, not wanting the family stuff that firms discriminate against women for should be an advantage in a high-pressure work environment. But women who don't want family & picket fence also often get judged for not fitting the "proper" mold for women - in society, generally, but also in the workplace. (See whichever employment discrimination case it was, where the woman won because she didn't get promoted despite excellent performance because she was too "aggressive" and "masculine." I'm blanking on the exact details/name, but it's a famous case.) Rock, meet hard place.

Fair point, but I think that's because they usually overcompensate for the unusualness of their ambitions (or lack thereof, as the case may be) by, for instance, looking down on more family-focused people and writing off their ambitions as, e.g., "that whole picket fence shit." Having that kind of attitude could certainly get a female associate tagged as a malcontent (in fact, judging from the broader body of danittt's TLS work, I think the malcontent perception is pretty much guaranteed). But being a chill, sociable woman who just happens to work her ass off, not take time off for family stuff, and not make a big deal about it either? I *really* have to strain to see how that's anything but a plus.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby danitt » Tue Mar 19, 2013 5:05 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
danitt wrote:Objection how are women in big law treated in your experience. As a woman, and one who doesn't want that whole picket fence shit, am I at a disadvantage by not presenting the whole familial unit picture.

Why in the world would intending to focus entirely on your career and not taking maternity leave or other long family-related absences be a negative? If women are at a disadvantage in law firms and other high-pressure work environments, it's probably precisely because most of them have goals (family, etc.) and demands on their time you're not interested in. Are you so accustomed to conceptualizing yourself as a victim that you just assume every aspect of yourself is a disadvantage?

Eh, this is kind of unfair. On the one hand, yes, not wanting the family stuff that firms discriminate against women for should be an advantage in a high-pressure work environment. But women who don't want family & picket fence also often get judged for not fitting the "proper" mold for women - in society, generally, but also in the workplace. (See whichever employment discrimination case it was, where the woman won because she didn't get promoted despite excellent performance because she was too "aggressive" and "masculine." I'm blanking on the exact details/name, but it's a famous case.) Rock, meet hard place.

Fair point, but I think that's because they usually overcompensate for the unusualness of their ambitions (or lack thereof, as the case may be) by, for instance, looking down on more family-focused people and writing off their ambitions as, e.g., "that whole picket fence shit." Having that kind of attitude could certainly get a female associate tagged as a malcontent (in fact, judging from the broader body of danittt's TLS work, I think the malcontent perception is pretty much guaranteed). But being a chill, sociable woman who just happens to work her ass off, not take time off for family stuff, and not make a big deal about it either? I *really* have to strain to see how that's anything but a plus.

You're actually reading way more into my question than I meant. I do appreciate A.Nony Mouse's input though because that's what I was referring too. I leave you with your assumptions. It's not like we have to agree on anything.

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A. Nony Mouse
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Tue Mar 19, 2013 5:22 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Fair point, but I think that's because they usually overcompensate for the unusualness of their ambitions (or lack thereof, as the case may be) by, for instance, looking down on more family-focused people and writing off their ambitions as, e.g., "that whole picket fence shit." Having that kind of attitude could certainly get a female associate tagged as a malcontent (in fact, judging from the broader body of danittt's TLS work, I think the malcontent perception is pretty much guaranteed). But being a chill, sociable woman who just happens to work her ass off, not take time off for family stuff, and not make a big deal about it either? I *really* have to strain to see how that's anything but a plus.

Yeah, see, I disagree that this is actually the case, except to the extent that sometimes people who do follow a more traditional family path perceive someone who doesn't as overcompensating/looking down on them. But then, I'm probably pretty much guaranteed to be labeled a malcontent, too. Anyway, I could totally see that at the associate level in a biglaw firm it's not an issue - it's just in a lot of contexts, you're damned if you do, damned if you don't.

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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby unc0mm0n1 » Tue Mar 19, 2013 5:38 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
This is also my question. I have no debt. In fact I made money while in law school. I have a Big Law SA and just want to collect some pay checks before they kick me out. How long can I get by in Big Law without volunteering for anything and just doing my work. I plan on transitioning to another field entirely where my JD is just preferred so I could care less about lateral opportunites which would require me to do as much high skill work as possible. Could I make it three years if I don't rock the boat?

Also I want to thank SBL and Objection. The discussion between you two has been great. It's nice to see people with drasticly different opinions argue on TLS without resorting to snarky comments or name calling. I think it's great that you both laid out two valid points and defended them. I actually learned something from this thread.

Let me prefix this by stating that this advice in no way applies to your summer associate gig. Everyone--every single law student alive--should take a summer associate job if they can get one. It's an insane amount of money for a summer's worth of easy work, free booze, and sailing trips. There's just no good reason not to do it.

But I'd think long and hard about whether you actually want to work for a big law firm if you really, truly don't care. The money's great, but it's not going to be great enough to make you last even 1-2 years unless you're at least interested in your practice group's work (even if you hate doc review). Even the people that bitch about biglaw life generally care about the practice of law and can find a way to be interested in what they're doing a lot of the time. Life's too short to go into a job knowing from the word "go" that it has absolutely zero chance of leaving you fulfilled in any meaningful way.


I thought the value added would be the huge pay checks. Maybe the poster comes from money but I know for a person who came from a poor background being able to pocket 150k in two years would be a nice motivation. That 150k could be a great starting point for whatever future plans they have.

NYstate
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby NYstate » Tue Mar 19, 2013 8:24 pm

FWIW: in the past I have covered for people on Jewish holidays and they have worked for me on Christmas. I never worked on thanksgiving itself but the day before and after. I usually have year end stuff to do, but if you are still working at midnight on New Year's Eve you have screwed something up. No one pushes the deadline that close unless some disaster happens.

About women in biglaw: it varies. Some have kids now and some wait until after their partnership chances are decided. Some never have kids, some have a few.

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Old Gregg
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Re: First year at a big firm; brutal hours; like the job. AMA.

Postby Old Gregg » Tue Mar 19, 2013 8:31 pm

Oddly enough, my actual experience wasn't all that bad, but only because I drew lines in the sand that I wouldn't budge on because I knew I was done (e.g. being asked to work on super bowl sunday, and refusing to do so).


This is easily the funniest line in the thread. I still remember it from a few pages ago.




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