New Game - disect dumb Rant on ATL from unemployed TTT Grad

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reasonable_man
Posts: 2200
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2009 5:41 pm

New Game - disect dumb Rant on ATL from unemployed TTT Grad

Postby reasonable_man » Tue Jan 29, 2013 4:22 pm

So ATL has this new piece each week from an unemployed TTT graduate complaining about being an unemployed TTT graduate. New game, let’s see if we can dissect each paragraph.. I’ll start.. Best dissection wins…

Gradenfreude: From Dreams of Being a Biglaw Big Shot to the Reality of Food Stamps
By Tristan Taylor Thomas Full post available here: --LinkRemoved--

I don’t know about everyone else, but when I was in law school, I would sometimes feel like a little kid again. And to answer your first question, no, it’s not because of the low level of education that I received at my TTT. Instead, I was reminded of my childhood, when I used to play sports in the backyard. I imagined that the game was in its final seconds, and then I would win it all by making that big final play. But as childhood fades away, so too does some of the fun of life.

RM says: Even in childhood this guy was a procrastinator – waiting till the last second to win the game is a loser move. Get it done in the first period/inning/quarter, etc.

What’s the proof of this? What once was a childish fantasy became a legal fantasy when I became an adult. That’s right, in law school, I would sometimes daydream about being a big shot attorney, with a huge, O.J.-sized case. I would spout off some legal jargon to the amazement of the jurors in my closing, and then they would come back after only a few minutes, giving my client the “win,” and making me very, very wealthy at the same time.

RM says: Oy.

However, just like my dreams of athletic glory, this dream now seems far-fetched. The résumés and cover letters continue to rack up in my sent mail box, but nothing except spam, CLE event notifications, Groupon ads, and messages from ugly girls on Match.com fill my inbox. Things have become so bad that I would even welcome a simple acknowledgement that my application was received….

RM says: 1) Ugly girls need love to and be happy that they are talking to your unemployed ass at all; 2) CLE events are a good place to meet practicing lawyer and usually newbies, especially unemployed newbies, can attend at low cost or for free (especially if you sign up for the bar association which, again, for newbies, is usually free).

Making matters worse, this past week my parents had to sit me down about contributing to the overall welfare of the family — which, of course, meant they wanted to talk about the lack of contribution on my part since I quit my full-time retail job just over a month ago. They said that something really needed to change, or else.

RM says: This is what is wrong with the special snowflake generation. You are unable to find a law job but you did find a retail job to hold you over for the time being (a good idea – not a permanent fix but it might keep you eating). Oh wait; you quit that job because it was presumably “beneath you.” Nice work!!! Your parents should send you packing right now.

And last week, something did change. I took the first steps to once again have the government hand me money that I did nothing truly special to receive, which I will never, ever pay back. On Friday, I made my way down to the local municipal building and signed up to receive food stamps. I still can’t believe it.

RM says: It was your choice to quit the low paying job and go on government assistance. Hopefully your application is denied when they learn that you voluntarily quit your position so that you can mope around at home full time and blog about not having a job yet.

I felt like I’d been punk’d after going to law school, and it was a crushing blow to my self-esteem. Like most people who fall on hard times, never did I picture myself signing up for government assistance. I felt similar to the athletes of today who go bankrupt. While I never had the fame or fortune they do, I still had the chance to “make it big,” or at least “make it TTT big” (does that even exist anymore?), but things just didn’t work out. I had all the tools needed, but one thing or another prevented me from reaching my full potential.

RM says: No. You never had “the tools needed.” Not even for a second. Anyone that attends a TTT and is shocked by a lack of a job at the end (even pre-crash 2008) is a fool. You knew from the outset (or should have known) that the deck was stacked against you and that you needed to be out there, from semester one forward, trying to find a small or medium sized firm to hire you part-time while in school and full time afterward. You never had “the tools needed.”

It was quite humbling to be in the public assistance office with people who so visibly and desperately need help, and to realize that I, as a law school graduate, am really no better off than they are. I was sitting in the same room with people who looked homeless, and trying to get the same exact government handout. This is what it’s come to for recent law school graduates, and I still can’t decide if it’s some sort of a sick joke.

RM says: Many of those people fell on hard times. You have an education (they might not). Start lowering your standards and take any job necessary. The public fund is not yours for the taking.

But I refuse to allow this situation to be a negative one. Instead, I’ll use this experience to fuel my dwindling motivation. After weeks of fruitless attempts to find a job, I grew depressed with my situation. But slipping a bit further into the hole and seeking food stamps actually served as a wake up call. I’m now motivated to get myself out of this funk, and help others who find themselves in hard times. I’m not sure what this will ultimately result in, but I have fire in my belly and I’m ready to make a change, somehow.

RM says: Cannot wait to see what this go-getter will come up with next!!!

Pokemon
Posts: 1860
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 11:58 pm

Re: New Game - disect dumb Rant on ATL from unemployed TTT Grad

Postby Pokemon » Tue Jan 29, 2013 4:54 pm

"What’s the proof of this? What once was a childish fantasy became a legal fantasy when I became an adult. That’s right, in law school, I would sometimes daydream about being a big shot attorney, with a huge, O.J.-sized case. I would spout off some legal jargon to the amazement of the jurors in my closing, and then they would come back after only a few minutes, giving my client the “win,” and making me very, very wealthy at the same time. "

You should not be in law school and imagine these sort of things. You should not be an adult and imagine these sort of things. The professional world is not a video game where you awe everyone... it is like the curve or the stock market, very hard to beat even when you work very hard. Understanding its complexity shows some sense of getting it; thinking that you will awe people with your trial theatrics, well then you are delusional and not getting adulthood and law.




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