V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

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AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Tue Jan 08, 2013 12:46 pm

TatteredDignity wrote:
SBL wrote:Also I can't be the only one wondering if the called-to-offer-a-settlement kid got an offer...


And whether they accepted the settlement offer...


Are you kidding me? That kid was lucky to see 5:00pm, let alone make it to the "offer" stage. It didn't go well.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Tue Jan 08, 2013 12:54 pm

son_of_ben wrote:Should you ever take a class because you think a prospective firm will want to see it on your transcript for an entry-level job?

More specifically, what would you do in my situation?

3L, TT/TTTish school, top 10%, mid-sized firm I was at for 2L summer has not given me an offer and probably will not because of the economy. I have not taken Evidence yet because all the profs who have taught it are terrible even though I am interested in litigation. I could take two Law Review credits to reach the graduation requirement for credits while having an easier Spring 3L and feverishly searching for a job before the bar or take the 4 credit Evidence class (and pay for 2 credits I do not need) . FWIW, I have a couple interviews coming up that look somewhat promising.

Thank you for answering all the previous questions too.


I think regardless of whether you want to go into litigation or not, Evidence is a class you need. Not only is it on the bar exam, but even in a transactional practice, issues just arise out of the blue sometime where you'll need to have background to identify a concern. Plus, it's not that hard of a class. I'd take it.

I'm not sure what you mean be "pay for two credits that you don't need". Do you have to pay for credits over what you need to graduate (law school didn't work that way back in the day)? Or are you just being more general and reasoning 'I'm in this for [90] credits and don't need any more'? If cost is an issue (and it always is) that might impact my decision.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Tue Jan 08, 2013 1:48 pm

Anonymous User wrote:How would you advise for competitive 2Ls that didn't get a job through OCI, to find those few elusive biglaw positions that may turn up during Spring semester? Thanks!


I think the process once you get the interview will be unchanged. Whenever we've had to go back out to conduct more interviews, it's always been because we had a need in a specific practice area that didn't surface during the regular interview season. I'd stay in close contact with your CSO, as that was always our first point of contact.

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manofjustice
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby manofjustice » Tue Jan 08, 2013 3:37 pm

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Last edited by manofjustice on Tue Jan 08, 2013 6:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:01 pm

skw wrote:What is your opinion of 2L SAs who are Law Review staff members, but elect not to pursue the Editorial Board? Does this impact your hiring decisions significantly?


Nope.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:07 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I tried to find a job with a firm doing litigation while in school and struck out on that. Fortunately I got hired on in-house with a large corporation after school. However, I still really want to go to a firm and get a more hands on litigation position. As of now my job mainly consists of asking someone above me to hire counsel, reviewing counsels work, and approving their bills to the company and making sure they're on budget. Any advice for me on the best way to lateral from a position like this to a firm? Unfortunately I will likely never have contact with counsel in my target market (my hometown). Also, how long do I need to stay here before it wouldn't look bad to potential firms that I'm looking to move on? It's only coming up on 3 months I've been here now. Thanks


I'd continue to follow the same tactics that I'd recommend for law students. Pick a few firms, do your research and reach out and make contacts. Are you targeting biglaw, or are you also looking at smaller firms. If not, I'd consider it, as their hiring practices are generally on an as-needed basis and don't follow traditional spring/fall patterns. I'd be careful about switching too much. One short term position can be easily cast aside under the "I just needed a job" rationale. It gets tricky after that.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:14 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I realize this is outside the scope of the thread a bit, but it is rare to have anonymous access to a lawyer with your level of experience.

I'm a third year associate in corporate group, in a major market, and probably do not have it in me to go the partner route (assuming it is even an option for me). I don't think I can handle work/life balance. When is the best time for me to go in-house? Stick it out to hone my skills as long as possible, or make the jump as soon as possible? Any tips on assessing opportunities for the best career trajectory? Any thoughts are much appreciated. I love the work, but the lifestyle is just difficult and takes its toll on personal relationships, in my experience. I realize there are articles out there about this topic. I have read a ton of them, but I have never been able to have a discussion with someone at your level about it (for fear of word getting back to my firm). Thank you for contributing your time.


Interesting. I'd try to stick it out for a bit, as the more experience you get in private practice, the higher up the food chain you'll land with an in-house position. Given what you've written, I think you'd want to be a candidate for "deal team" positions within a company rather than "procurement" which isn't very demanding time-wise, but also gets a little boring, from what I've been told. Also, as you climb the ladder at your firm, you'll have more client contact and be able to mine that for in-house positions, which is good because you'll at least have a sense of the way they do business and their culture.

Have you considered moving to a firm in a smaller market? Some of the folks we deal with work on some very sophisticated transactions, but without the rigorous work schedule.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Tue Jan 08, 2013 4:25 pm

Anonymous User wrote:3L at a top 50 school here. I rank in the top 30%, on LR and participated on a moot court team. I worked for the government for my summers (Public Defenders and the Attorney Generals).

I sent off an OCI application at the firm that I want to work at and they declined to interview me. I sought an entry level position, but they ended up interviewing only 2Ls. I am graduating early and I realize that they were looking solely for a summer associate. Also, I go to school in the state I want to practice in, but I realize that the fact that I am from out of state makes me seem like more of a flight risk.

I know someone who has clerked at the firm and I am beginning the process of trying to get their attention. What is your advice for a 3L in my position? What should I do to get their attention? How bad is the fact that they declined to interview me in the past?

My friend who clerked there has given me the name of the hiring partner. What is the most effective way to make an initial positive contact with the firm?


Sorry for answering a question with a series of questions here, but I'm going to do it anyway so that I don't just end up reiterating previous posts (not a complaint, this is a good question).

I assume your friend doesn't work there anymore, correct? If not, and assuming he/she parted on good terms, does she know any other people to recommend?

If she's on good terms with the hiring chair, it's fine for her to make the introduction. If not, you might want to make a person that she is close to your initial contact. Assuming that's a possibility, I'd just make a phone call and offer to buy a cup of coffee. During that meeting you can tout all of the direct experience you got working for the government (assume you got a pretty good shot, even as an intern) and ask for an introduction to the hiring chair.

If all else fails, give a shout to the hiring chair, but then you run the risk of him looking back through their database, seeing that you weren't given an interview, and blowing you off.

Anonymous User
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jan 08, 2013 9:03 pm

AnotherYearOlder wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I realize this is outside the scope of the thread a bit, but it is rare to have anonymous access to a lawyer with your level of experience.

I'm a third year associate in corporate group, in a major market, and probably do not have it in me to go the partner route (assuming it is even an option for me). I don't think I can handle work/life balance. When is the best time for me to go in-house? Stick it out to hone my skills as long as possible, or make the jump as soon as possible? Any tips on assessing opportunities for the best career trajectory? Any thoughts are much appreciated. I love the work, but the lifestyle is just difficult and takes its toll on personal relationships, in my experience. I realize there are articles out there about this topic. I have read a ton of them, but I have never been able to have a discussion with someone at your level about it (for fear of word getting back to my firm). Thank you for contributing your time.


Interesting. I'd try to stick it out for a bit, as the more experience you get in private practice, the higher up the food chain you'll land with an in-house position. Given what you've written, I think you'd want to be a candidate for "deal team" positions within a company rather than "procurement" which isn't very demanding time-wise, but also gets a little boring, from what I've been told. Also, as you climb the ladder at your firm, you'll have more client contact and be able to mine that for in-house positions, which is good because you'll at least have a sense of the way they do business and their culture.

Have you considered moving to a firm in a smaller market? Some of the folks we deal with work on some very sophisticated transactions, but without the rigorous work schedule.


Thanks for the response. Do you have a sense for what level of experience is generally required for "deal team" jobs? The ability to run an M&A deal without or with very limited supervision? I am guessing I am at least 2 years away from this. I have heard from some clients on these teams (e.g., VC general counsels) that these jobs can sometimes be just as demanding as firms but less pay - thoughts? I get the same feedback from some GCs of mid-sized companies as well. Smaller markets aren't very attractive to me because I have tight ties to my market. Honestly, I love the work and the people, but I also love my wife and family. I am fearful of those boring "procurement" jobs. I like the intellectual challenge and responsibility. I am hoping I can straddle the best of both worlds... but unsure whether this is possible really. A month or two or a hectic schedule per year is very palatable - several AM nights every month and an "early" leave-time of 8:30pm is less so, especially once kids arrive.

Thanks again for any guidance or insight. I really appreciate it!

Anonymous User
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jan 08, 2013 9:14 pm

How do you look at Someone that spent a short time at a firm and then went and clerked? Not dedicated to the practice of law? Not cut out for private practice?

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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jan 08, 2013 9:40 pm

How do you judge transfers? More specifically, someone moving from a T50 to a T6 school. Are they judged at the new school's median, based on their old school's GPA cutoffs at your firm, or some other measure?

Would you suggest that someone with the grades to transfer should transfer?

Anonymous User
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Jan 08, 2013 10:06 pm

How closely do you look at Writing Samples?

I just sent one in and realized I had a few (not so small) mistakes. Any advice?

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:34 pm

Bump... Thought I'd try this again this year in case it helps anyone.

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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:47 pm

When hiring for a patent job (for the summer or following graduation), what are the most important criteria out of things such as: law school GPA, undergrad GPA, graduate degrees/GPA (Masters/PhD), law review, moot court, background/work experience, other(s)? Thanks!

Anonymous User
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:57 pm

Thanks for taking questions.

Say a young associate is applying to lateral into your firm but, several years ago, the lawyer rejected spending 2L summer with your firm- does that lawyer's earlier decision factor negatively into your evaluation of his application? If so, what types of things are you looking for to make up for that earlier decision?

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Thu Jan 02, 2014 5:15 pm

Anonymous User wrote:When hiring for a patent job (for the summer or following graduation), what are the most important criteria out of things such as: law school GPA, undergrad GPA, graduate degrees/GPA (Masters/PhD), law review, moot court, background/work experience, other(s)? Thanks!


1. Work Experience
2. Degrees
3. GPA

These are positions where the firm is typically looking for a pretty specific skill set because, as the complexity of these matters have grown, so has the need for patent lawyers with the background to digest the nuances of the matter.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Thu Jan 02, 2014 5:20 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Thanks for taking questions.

Say a young associate is applying to lateral into your firm but, several years ago, the lawyer rejected spending 2L summer with your firm- does that lawyer's earlier decision factor negatively into your evaluation of his application? If so, what types of things are you looking for to make up for that earlier decision?


If you handled yourself professionally when rejecting the firm earlier. Assuming you did, their reaction is going to be "We really liked her/him before, but couldn't land her" and, if there's a need, you'll still get an interview. In either event, we'd be interested in the type of work you've done since we last met, who you've worked with, what your level of responsibility has been, etc.

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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jan 02, 2014 8:03 pm

I was a summer in a v50-75ish firm in a medium-sized city, and then had a federal clerkship, during which I had offers from some v10-50 firms in major cities (mostly DC/LA/SF). I ended up going back to the same firm and city where I summered. 2 years later, I’m now regretting it a bit. How difficult would it be to move from a medium-sized city (e.g., Phoenix, Kansas City, Salt Lake, Albuquerque, etc.) to DC/LA/SF?

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Thu Jan 02, 2014 9:31 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I was a summer in a v50-75ish firm in a medium-sized city, and then had a federal clerkship, during which I had offers from some v10-50 firms in major cities (mostly DC/LA/SF). I ended up going back to the same firm and city where I summered. 2 years later, I’m now regretting it a bit. How difficult would it be to move from a medium-sized city (e.g., Phoenix, Kansas City, Salt Lake, Albuquerque, etc.) to DC/LA/SF?


I think if you use the network you generated during your clerkship and are willing to be patient, it can certainly work. Make sure you emphasize how you were able to use the skills you gained during your clerkship on complex matters during your practice.

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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jan 02, 2014 11:10 pm

Thanks for taking questions! I have questions on a few different topics.

How long is it usually between someones callback interview and your firm getting back to the candidate with an offer/rejection? If someone hasn't heard either way, at what point is it acceptable for them to follow up?

Also, earlier you mentioned the value of connecting with someone at the firm and getting them to go to bat for you. How helpful is a more distant connection? For example, if I'm close to a former partner at the firm, and prior to the interview he sends a recommendation to one of the interviewers he knows, is this beneficial?

Finally, I'm curious about the selection and importance of each interviewer during a callback interview. At your firm, how are who conducts interviews determined? Is each interview weighed equally, or is the interview with the hiring partner more important?

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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jan 02, 2014 11:13 pm

What recommendations do you have for 2Ls still searching for a summer job at this point?

I've mailed, networked, applied, kept up with places, etc. and have interviewed at a variety of places. Unfortunately, I still don't have anything.

As a more specific question, is there any value to having someone recommend you to a firm after you've interviewed (callback style interview) there? I have someone who works in the same city offering to do so, but I don't know if it is a good idea or not.

Thanks!!

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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jan 02, 2014 11:20 pm

After callback interviews (for 2L summer associate positions), I have been sending e-mail thank you notes to each person I talked to during the interview and anyone I know at the firm who helped me get the interview. The notes thank them for their time, mention something specific we talked about during the interview, and reiterate my interest in the firm. Is this what you would recommend?

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Thu Jan 02, 2014 11:59 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Thanks for taking questions! I have questions on a few different topics.

How long is it usually between someones callback interview and your firm getting back to the candidate with an offer/rejection? If someone hasn't heard either way, at what point is it acceptable for them to follow up?

Also, earlier you mentioned the value of connecting with someone at the firm and getting them to go to bat for you. How helpful is a more distant connection? For example, if I'm close to a former partner at the firm, and prior to the interview he sends a recommendation to one of the interviewers he knows, is this beneficial?

Finally, I'm curious about the selection and importance of each interviewer during a callback interview. At your firm, how are who conducts interviews determined? Is each interview weighed equally, or is the interview with the hiring partner more important?


I'd give it two weeks before circling back, unless the firm has indicated that the wait will be longer/shorter. Many firms have bi-weekly recruiting meetings and depending where your interview falls in that schedule, you could be in for a wait. Also, at this point, many firms are waiting for grades or OCIs, which could contribute to a longer wait. If you've got another job offer and need to make a decision, it's also okay to give the other firms a heads-up. It's often appreciated. Don't overplay that hand, though, because recruiters talk.

It's absolutely okay to have a firm alumni reach out and vouch for you, especially if you've already interviewed and haven't been rejected. You're still in the hunt for a reason.

I'd say that the interview with the hiring partner is slightly more important, as the hiring partner may very well meet with all of the candidates. Also, if the hiring partner feels strongly about you (one way or the other) other members of the recruiting team will tend to give deference (but not always). After that, things tend to even out, although seniority/experience still carries weight. I don't know any firms that weight interview evaluations differently -- I'd suspect they were over-thinking the process. We try to have the same core group of people do the lion's share of the interviews.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Fri Jan 03, 2014 12:02 am

Anonymous User wrote:After callback interviews (for 2L summer associate positions), I have been sending e-mail thank you notes to each person I talked to during the interview and anyone I know at the firm who helped me get the interview. The notes thank them for their time, mention something specific we talked about during the interview, and reiterate my interest in the firm. Is this what you would recommend?


This is perfectly acceptable. While thank you notes aren't required, a nice, personalized note is always appreciated. E-mail is a fine way to communicate (unless you interviewed some ancient partner -- they might like a handwritten note). MAKE SURE YOU PROOFREAD YOUR NOTE. While a thank you note probably never got anyone a job, an embarrassing typo or bad reference certainly has cost people opportunities.

AnotherYearOlder
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Re: V100 Hiring Partner Taking Questions

Postby AnotherYearOlder » Fri Jan 03, 2014 12:07 am

Anonymous User wrote:What recommendations do you have for 2Ls still searching for a summer job at this point?

I've mailed, networked, applied, kept up with places, etc. and have interviewed at a variety of places. Unfortunately, I still don't have anything.

As a more specific question, is there any value to having someone recommend you to a firm after you've interviewed (callback style interview) there? I have someone who works in the same city offering to do so, but I don't know if it is a good idea or not.

Thanks!!


I think I accidentally answered part of your question two posts up (sorry), but I think it's always beneficial to have people go to bat for you. People understand the job market and how tough it is. If they're offering to help, you have the right to assume that it's sincere and take them up on it. If you're already interviewed at the firm and are still in it, all the better.

Sounds like you're doing all the right things. Hang in there. Things often shake loose after the end of the year when firms have a final picture of how the prior year went. Lots of firs did better this year than they thought they would even six months ago, so something could shake loose.

Keep going to those receptions, bar events, and activities. Keep your network fresh. It might take a few more months, but it will pay off.




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