Patent Eligilbility

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Anonymous User
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Patent Eligilbility

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Oct 23, 2012 11:53 pm

Does anyone know whether firms require an actual bachelor's degree in science or engineering to practice patent prosecution, or is it just the ability to pass the patent bar? For example, I have a bachelor's in finance and a minor in biology. This makes me eligible to take the patent bar, but obviously lacks the bachelor's in science. Does it make a difference?

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rinkrat19
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Re: Patent eligilbility

Postby rinkrat19 » Tue Oct 23, 2012 11:58 pm

Some firms will only hire from a few select majors (say, CS, EE and PhDs in chemistry or physics) for their IP group.

Are you sure you qualify, btw? It doesn't seem like a minor would have enough credits to qualify.

Option 2
32 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
· 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and
· 24 semester hours in biology, botany, microbiology, or molecular biology.
(The 8 semester hours in chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two sequential semesters, each semester including a lab. Only courses for science or engineering majors will be accepted.)

Option 4: 40 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
· 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and
· 32 semester hours of chemistry, physics, biology, botany, microbiology, molecular
biology or engineering.
(The 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two sequential semesters, each semester including a lab. Only courses for science or engineering majors will be accepted.)

Anonymous User
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Re: Patent eligilbility

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Oct 24, 2012 12:04 am

rinkrat19 wrote:Some firms will only hire from a few select majors (say, CS, EE and PhDs in chemistry or physics) for their IP group.

Are you sure you qualify, btw? It doesn't seem like a minor would have enough credits to qualify.

Option 2
32 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
· 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and
· 24 semester hours in biology, botany, microbiology, or molecular biology.
(The 8 semester hours in chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two sequential semesters, each semester including a lab. Only courses for science or engineering majors will be accepted.)

Option 4: 40 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
· 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and
· 32 semester hours of chemistry, physics, biology, botany, microbiology, molecular
biology or engineering.
(The 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two sequential semesters, each semester including a lab. Only courses for science or engineering majors will be accepted.)


I fall under option 2: 32 total hours (8 in chemistry and 24 in biology). This was exact requirement for a biology minor at my undergraduate institution.

Anonymous User
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Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Oct 24, 2012 4:03 pm

OP here...also to go along with that, aside from firm requirements, would not having a full on bachelor's degree substantially inhibit me from being proficient in patent work even if I did go ahead and pass the Patent Bar?

09042014
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Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby 09042014 » Wed Oct 24, 2012 4:10 pm

Anonymous User wrote:OP here...also to go along with that, aside from firm requirements, would not having a full on bachelor's degree substantially inhibit me from being proficient in patent work even if I did go ahead and pass the Patent Bar?


It'll probably significantly diminish your marketability. Try getting a patent agent job, if you can pull that, you should be able to get a patent prosecution jerb if you go to law school

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ExBiglawAssociate
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Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby ExBiglawAssociate » Wed Oct 24, 2012 4:10 pm

Anonymous User wrote:OP here...also to go along with that, aside from firm requirements, would not having a full on bachelor's degree substantially inhibit me from being proficient in patent work even if I did go ahead and pass the Patent Bar?


Most likely, you will never get anyone to hire you, but you could probably do the work.

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rinkrat19
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Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby rinkrat19 » Wed Oct 24, 2012 4:26 pm

OP, I haven't been through OCI yet, but this is my personal philosophy: I have an engineering degree, but not one of the "right" ones. I'm looking at being patent bar eligible as a box I can check off on my resume that a lot of others can't, which might make me a little more versatile and therefore more attractive to firms. I am NOT betting on it being my ticket to a job at an IP firm or in the IP group of a big firm.

Anonymous User
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Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:06 pm

Biglaw_Associate_V20 wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:OP here...also to go along with that, aside from firm requirements, would not having a full on bachelor's degree substantially inhibit me from being proficient in patent work even if I did go ahead and pass the Patent Bar?


Most likely, you will never get anyone to hire you, but you could probably do the work.



OP here. Hypothetically then, if I passed the Patent Bar, have the grades, but was hired more for soft IP or other work, could I conceivably end up with the opportunity to do patent work? Or would does it still simply come down to firms not trusting that type of work to someone without a higher degree?

Also, for clarification: do you mean that no firms would hire me to do their client's work, or that no client would hire me to do their work?

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:08 pm

rinkrat19 wrote:OP, I haven't been through OCI yet, but this is my personal philosophy: I have an engineering degree, but not one of the "right" ones. I'm looking at being patent bar eligible as a box I can check off on my resume that a lot of others can't, which might make me a little more versatile and therefore more attractive to firms. I am NOT betting on it being my ticket to a job at an IP firm or in the IP group of a big firm.


OP here. I feel the same way. If nothing else, it seems like it will make a resume stronger, even by a small amount. My feeling is that it definitely can't hurt, especially if you're not patent prosecution or bust.

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ExBiglawAssociate
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Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby ExBiglawAssociate » Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:17 pm

Clients sometimes request people with specific degrees and technical experience (i.e., engineering work at a tech company) to work on some matters. This includes some litigation matters and basically all prosecution matters. Firms do what their clients want, for the most part, so they will usually do the same.

However, there are plenty of people who do not have technical backgrounds who litigate patents. If you want to litigate patents, good grades from a good law school matter a lot more than passing the patent bar.

law098
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Re: Patent Eligilbility

Postby law098 » Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:30 pm

Maybe my experience can help

I am a registered patent attorney and do not have the required degree. I was premed in undergrad, though, so had the science classes necessary to take the patent bar. I currently work in a very small IP boutique firm doing some prosecution, mostly litigation. This has been my experience, learned from speaking with people at larger/better firms, my own experience at my firm, and in looking for other jobs (I graduated law school around '08 so it's been a tough road):

1) Biglaw IP depts & prestigious IP boutique firms (fish & richardson) = degree (and-as usual-school, grades, rankings) matters a lot
2) Small boutique firms (like mine) = jobs are few and far between; degrees matter but not as much; it is easier to switch between practices areas (lit to pros) if the work's available, but you're not usually writing applications for things within your area of "expertise" (e.g., I never do chem or bio, mostly just simple mech. eng. type stuff that you learn along the way). These firms offer more flexibility if you can land a job in the first place, but the work seems to be more "we take what we can get"

Ok that probably wasn't very helpful, but if you want more info on working for a small boutique firm let me know.




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