nvm

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nvm

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Sep 08, 2012 8:13 am

nvm
Last edited by Anonymous User on Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Anonymous User
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Re: Kirkland v. Paul Weiss v. Wiley Rein (all DC)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Sep 08, 2012 11:08 am

In terms of practice areas, if you're really sold on litigation, isn't Kirkland the only answer here?
Among your options Kirkland is the only litigation department of any prominence in D.C., unless you're considering government contracts practice as litigation in which case Wiley Rein may enter the conversation. But if you're talking general commercial litigation, Kirkland is without a doubt the place to go.

Other comments:
Kirkland's D.C. office is well established and well regarded both within the city an the firm. They've had an office in D.C. for over 80 years, with dozens and dozens of homegrown partners it does not take a "backseat."
Paul Weiss, on the other hand, is still very much a New York Firm. While their D.C. office is growing, the "backseat" fear is much more relevant here.

In general, be weary of Wiley Rein. Their two tiered associate structure leads to some very awkward peer relations from what I've heard from friends.

Anonymous User
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Re: Kirkland v. Paul Weiss v. Wiley Rein (all DC)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Sep 08, 2012 8:43 pm

Anonymous User wrote:In terms of practice areas, if you're really sold on litigation, isn't Kirkland the only answer here?
Among your options Kirkland is the only litigation department of any prominence in D.C., unless you're considering government contracts practice as litigation in which case Wiley Rein may enter the conversation. But if you're talking general commercial litigation, Kirkland is without a doubt the place to go.

Other comments:
Kirkland's D.C. office is well established and well regarded both within the city an the firm. They've had an office in D.C. for over 80 years, with dozens and dozens of homegrown partners it does not take a "backseat."
Paul Weiss, on the other hand, is still very much a New York Firm. While their D.C. office is growing, the "backseat" fear is much more relevant here.

In general, be weary of Wiley Rein. Their two tiered associate structure leads to some very awkward peer relations from what I've heard from friends.


I work at Wiley. I'm not too familiar with Kirkland or Paul Weiss, so I can't comment on the comparative value of Wiley vs. those firms. However, I just wanted to write to say that I have never experienced the "very awkward peer relations" that the previous poster mentioned, nor do I have any idea where this would even come from. The "two tiered associate structure" (which some other DC firms like Hogan have) is not a big deal, since you'll probably want to bill 1950 hours and make $160K since that's what biglawyers do.

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Kirkland v. Paul Weiss v. Wiley Rein (all DC)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Sep 08, 2012 11:02 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I work at Wiley. I'm not too familiar with Kirkland or Paul Weiss, so I can't comment on the comparative value of Wiley vs. those firms. However, I just wanted to write to say that I have never experienced the "very awkward peer relations" that the previous poster mentioned, nor do I have any idea where this would even come from. The "two tiered associate structure" (which some other DC firms like Hogan have) is not a big deal, since you'll probably want to bill 1950 hours and make $160K since that's what biglawyers do.


Just relaying what I was told by someone who lateraled out of Wiley. He said that there was not always a lot of work to go around, creating an undesirable dynamic where associates fight for work to make sure they hit there hours, lest they be dropped to the lower tier. He also disliked being started at the 135 level and only receiving market pay as deferred compensation.

Anonymous User
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Re: Kirkland v. Paul Weiss v. Wiley Rein (all DC)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Sep 08, 2012 11:26 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I work at Wiley. I'm not too familiar with Kirkland or Paul Weiss, so I can't comment on the comparative value of Wiley vs. those firms. However, I just wanted to write to say that I have never experienced the "very awkward peer relations" that the previous poster mentioned, nor do I have any idea where this would even come from. The "two tiered associate structure" (which some other DC firms like Hogan have) is not a big deal, since you'll probably want to bill 1950 hours and make $160K since that's what biglawyers do.


Just relaying what I was told by someone who lateraled out of Wiley. He said that there was not always a lot of work to go around, creating an undesirable dynamic where associates fight for work to make sure they hit there hours, lest they be dropped to the lower tier. He also disliked being started at the 135 level and only receiving market pay as deferred compensation.


Two years ago (before I got here) this might have been the case (less work because of ITE); it's not the case now. But in any situation where you have a billable hours target and a limited supply of work this would happen.

Anonymous User
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Re: Kirkland v. Paul Weiss v. Wiley Rein (all DC)

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Sep 08, 2012 11:50 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Any thoughts? I'm pretty sold on litigation. However, I also want a firm whose DC offices don't take a serious backseat to offices in other cities. Liked the people at all three firms, though.


In the world of DC litigation, Kirkland is head and shoulders above Paul Weiss and Wiley Rein. Unless you really got a bad vibe from Kirkland during your CB, you should take that offer and not look back. I summered at a top DC firm my 2L year (clerking now) and I strongly believe that Kirkland is a peer of Cov, W&C, A&P, and Wilmer. And, if someone wants to work in litigation for Kirkland, DC is the office to be in.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273186
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Kirkland v. Paul Weiss v. Wiley Rein (all DC)

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:56 pm

Anonymous User wrote:In terms of practice areas, if you're really sold on litigation, isn't Kirkland the only answer here?
Among your options Kirkland is the only litigation department of any prominence in D.C., unless you're considering government contracts practice as litigation in which case Wiley Rein may enter the conversation. But if you're talking general commercial litigation, Kirkland is without a doubt the place to go.

Other comments:
Kirkland's D.C. office is well established and well regarded both within the city an the firm. They've had an office in D.C. for over 80 years, with dozens and dozens of homegrown partners it does not take a "backseat."
Paul Weiss, on the other hand, is still very much a New York Firm. While their D.C. office is growing, the "backseat" fear is much more relevant here.

In general, be weary of Wiley Rein. Their two tiered associate structure leads to some very awkward peer relations from what I've heard from friends.


I second this. For general commercial or IP litigation, Kirkland is a no brainer.




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