High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

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High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:22 pm

I am seriously underperforming at OCI (about halfway through). Great grades, Law Review, school just below the Top 10.

I tried all day to get candid feedback from those who ought to know and are in a position to tell me (non-law friends, CSO folks whom I know well, someone in student affairs who I know personally), and I haven't heard that I am socially awkward or anything. I really can't figure what went wrong vs. "the firm just liked other students better."

The best advice I have gotten is "act more excited" and "be more genuine." I am a laid-back person, though. My personality isn't going to change overnight, and if I were perfectly genuine, nobody would hire me. Maybe I come across as a phony? Who knows? Anyway, I am going debt free, so I have determined to drop out and "redo" OCI if I strike out. In the meantime, since I have about a dozen interviews left, what are some high risk, high reward interview strategies? Basically, my normal "do everything right" approach isn't working. So I want to go into my next dozen interviews doing something unique that might screw up some of them but might land a callback or two as well (because what I've been doing clearly isn't working).

Anyway, most of my school's OCI is preselect, so the interview matters MUCH more than schools that are lottery.

In the meantime, the CSO is reaching out to several firms on my behalf.

[Sorry for the bad grammar and disorganization. I typed this super drunk, but my interviews were sober, of course]
Last edited by Anonymous User on Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviews

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:25 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Anyway, most of my school's OCI is preselect, so the interview matters MUCH more than schools that are lottery.

In the meantime, the CSO is reaching out to several firms on my behalf.


1) Id say that pre-select interviews are easier than lottery, because they actually WANT to interview you. In lottery, sometimes they look at your resume and your done - Your interview means nill.
2) awesome of your CDO
3) Id watch some of your friends who are good at interviews. Maybe its a body language thing? maybe its your wardrobe? maybe its your enthusiasm. I think watching is an easier way to learn imo. GL!

edit: my t14 is having mixed results as well.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviews

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:32 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Anyway, most of my school's OCI is preselect, so the interview matters MUCH more than schools that are lottery.

In the meantime, the CSO is reaching out to several firms on my behalf.


1) Id say that pre-select interviews are easier than lottery, because they actually WANT to interview you. In lottery, sometimes they look at your resume and your done - Your interview means nill.
2) awesome of your CDO
3) Id watch some of your friends who are good at interviews. Maybe its a body language thing? maybe its your wardrobe? maybe its your enthusiasm. I think watching is an easier way to learn imo. GL!

edit: my t14 is having mixed results as well.



Well, I think lottery is better for students with great paper credentials whose interviews do not stand out. You'll get a callback if you're not awkward or aspie but have good grades. With preselects, it seems as if you need to impress to get a callback because everyone interviewing has acceptable credentials, and firms still interview a ton of people.

Most of my friends who are good at interviews have a completely different personality. They are the types who yell to be heard in a crowded bar for the whole conversation. They are more animated and more extroverted. Better at making a quick connection with the interviewer. I am conversational and pleasant (described by others) but I'm kind of soft-spoken. That doesn't really help because personalities can't change overnight (of course, my dropping out and redoing OCI might actually give some time for something along those lines).

I am wondering if the issue is that I have a super super interesting resume. But the way I present is not that interesting or captivating.

Body language is a possibility, except that I've done tons of mock interviews and that hasn't come up. Wardrobe is standard conservative Brook Brothers well-fitted navy and charcoal suits with a conservative tie, white shirt, and Allen Edmonds shoes. Many of my classmates who have gotten callbacks wear much riskier outfits.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviews

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:33 pm

Show some passion and excitement for the practice of law and in your answers.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviews

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:40 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Show some passion and excitement for the practice of law and in your answers.


I am not a passionate person. I just am not. I am a laid-back, somewhat sarcastic person, which is not something one wants to convey in interviews. I certainly am not passionate about the practice of law because I really have very little idea what the practice of law consists of (do any 2Ls?). That's not going to change. I am here because I couldn't think of anything else to do with my History degree and I am the exact opposite of entrepreneurial. See why I can't tell the truth? I try to sound more excited in interviews, so maybe that's where the phoniness comes from? It certainly sounds awkward sometimes.

Anyway, I want a strategy that will do one of two things: 1) make the interviewer laugh like they've never laughed before and remember me (I have a good dry sense of humor) or 2) be offended and kick me out of the room instantly. I figure if I fuck up 50% of a dozen interviews but knock the other 50% out of the park that's still 6 callbacks. That's how I need to be playing because playing it safe clearly isn't working when competing with much more exciting classmates.

One other thing I've thought of trying is to just be perfectly honest in a few interviews, basically a reflection of the first paragraph, and see if that comes across better. Maybe they are tired of the fact that I am one of dozens of students who tells them what they want to hear. I had an interview with one of Susman Godfrey/Ware Jackson/Barrasso/Beck Secrest (outside OCI) where I tried pushing the boundaries of what I would consider inappropriate just a little (relating over-the-top rumors about the firm), and it certainly made the conversation flow better (my interviewer even had some good laughs).

One of my male (not good-looking like me, super nerdy with glasses) classmates with lower grades than me interviewed with a firm and then went to a reception that night inappropriately dressed, made in appropriate comments, got super drunk and bordered on sexual harrassment towards firm individuals, and did sexually suggestive yoga poses and still got a callback with this firm. I know for a fact I am a ding. WTF?

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby aces » Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:55 pm

Problem is that a high-risk/high-reward strategy (hypotheticals: telling borderline-inappropriate stories, being brutally honest about why you went to law school, etc.) isn't going to be some 50/50 endeavor where you utterly fail half your interviews and knock the socks off of the other half. Instead, you'll maybe impress 1 out of 5 or 1 out of 10 interviewers and alienate the rest, and there's a good chance that you might not even get a receptive interviewer and just end up torpedoing your chances due to premature panic.

Look, I know it sucks to be going through the process and having the dings start piling up with few/no callbacks, but if noone can really identify anything you're doing in particular which is hurting your chances, staying the course might be the best or only option. A dozen or so screening interviews is not the most robust sample, and maybe you've just gotten unlucky so far (personality mismatches, an interviewer who also saw the handful of true superstars at your school, etc). The last thing you want to do is to do something stupid and risk blowing your last few chances at a summer position.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 12:07 am

At one of the law firms I had callbacks with, interviewers are given a form where they are asked to provide feedback on 3 qualities: Intellect, Interpersonal Abilities, and Drive. By drive, they often also mean passion--not just about law, but in things you do in life. So, admitting straight up that you're passionless re: the law might not be the best strategy.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Real Madrid » Wed Aug 22, 2012 12:15 am

Agree with aces. I'm no OCI expert, but having a "successful" inappropriate personality is not as easy as just wanting to be that way. It takes a certain personality to pull off jokes or make comments like those you're referring to without overly offending people, and it's not something you can just start doing successfully. If you try and force a personality change, it's just gonna come across awkwardly. I think it's more likely that you've just had a string of bad luck or you're inaccurately assessing how these interviews went post-interview.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby legalmindedfella » Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:00 am

The highest-risk, highest-reward strategy - at the screener stage, at least - is just to delete the filter. Talk normally.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:02 am

Yeah, I agree that I wouldn't try to do high-risk stuff. I haven't gone through OCI yet (it's tomorrow), so I would take what I say with a grain of salt. But generally, in the past, if I got an interview, I got the job.

I think interviewing is based off people's gut reaction, and that can be based on many intangibles you subtly communicate. For example, I always wanted to appear intelligent over the years, and I think that desire is subtly communicated by my demeanor, manner of speech, and looks (e.g. glasses). That aspect is hard for me to now change. If you generally are proud of your laidback style and sarcastic humor, it's hard to hide it because it's engrained into your subconscious habits.

However, it's not impossible to overcome. I'm actually a shy and quiet person in real life. But when I walk into an interview or go before a podium, I always adopt the mentality that I am another person, not my real self. I learned to adopt this attitude, as I used to do speech and debate and had to overcome my quiet awkwardness to succeed there. As such, I often walk into the room with a mentality of acting, and I actually try to envision myself kind of like a powerful person I highly respect and wish to emulate. It really helps me to act more confidently and with more extroversion. I also like to listen to pump up music before interviewing... something that makes me feel confident.

And again, as others echoed, keep up at the process. I think everyone has a rough time out there on the market. Good luck! Fingers crossed for you.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby BaiAilian2013 » Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:15 am

You don't need a high-risk, high-reward strategy. You just need to TRY HARDER. You think the rest of us are naturally upbeat, enthusiastic people? Go stand in the bathroom mirror and try on likable personalities until you find one you can fit into.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby sunynp » Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:31 am

I think what you are talking about are high risk - no reward strategies. No one is going to hire someone who sounds like they are ambivalent about being a lawyer, ie working hard. You sound like you might end up being a whiner and no one wants that.

Here's the thing: do you want a job?
If so, figure out how to be likable, positive and engaging . Your grades are not going to get you a job if your personality sucks. There is so much competition for jobs that no one will hire you if you act like you dont care. Practicing law is extremely demanding, if you have no enthusiasm now, how will you be as a jaded second year?

If the fear of unemployment doesn't motivate you to change your attitude, then I'm not sure what will.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:57 am

You need to find someone who will be brutally honest with you. It just does not make sense that a reasonably personable candidate with no hygiene or presentation issues who got good grades and law review at a good school is striking out. It could be that there is something that the people you're talking too are reticent about owning up to.

Are you interviewing with firms who are either above or far below your GPA range?

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 8:54 am

Anonymous User wrote:I am seriously underperforming at OCI (about halfway through). Great grades, Law Review, school just below the Top 10.

I tried all day to get candid feedback from those who ought to know and are in a position to tell me (non-law friends, CSO folks whom I know well, someone in student affairs who I know personally), and I haven't heard that I am socially awkward or anything. I really can't figure what went wrong vs. "the firm just liked other students better."

The best advice I have gotten is "act more excited" and "be more genuine." I am a laid-back person, though. My personality isn't going to change overnight, and if I were perfectly genuine, nobody would hire me. Maybe I come across as a phony? Who knows? Anyway, I am going debt free, so I have determined to drop out and "redo" OCI if I strike out. In the meantime, since I have about a dozen interviews left, what are some high risk, high reward interview strategies? Basically, my normal "do everything right" approach isn't working. So I want to go into my next dozen interviews doing something unique that might screw up some of them but might land a callback or two as well (because what I've been doing clearly isn't working).

Anyway, most of my school's OCI is preselect, so the interview matters MUCH more than schools that are lottery.

In the meantime, the CSO is reaching out to several firms on my behalf.

[Sorry for the bad grammar and disorganization. I typed this super drunk, but my interviews were sober, of course]
I was and am in a similar situation, so I think that my experience might be useful to you. Huge number of screeners and small number of callbacks. I thought I had done really, really well on the interviews, or at least 80%, and yet I wasn't doing well. I did mock interviews with both Career Services and with friends, and I had done a lot of preparation before the interviews. As I was underperforming, I spoke to friends at law firms, and some of the people who I interviewed with. No one really gave me anything other than "they just had some more suitable candidates", which is the truth, because there's no "grade" on an interview, so they're going to have trouble pinpointing exactly where the other person's advantage came.

Finally, I said to a friend who had been an OCI interviewer at a firm, that rather than looking at my resume, or critiquing me in a mock interview to determine whether there was a problem, he should assume that there was a problem and tell me what it might be. Once he thought about it in that light, he suggested that I was probably overprepared, too intense, and that I talk too quickly. Though he wasn't there for my interviews, I am pretty sure he was right. I went in with the mindset that this is the one chance to impress them with my work ethic and knowledge of the firm and the law. I felt constrained by the 20 minute interview time, so I talked very fast trying to get as much info as possible across. I had prepared answers to classic questions, and in retrospect, I'm sure it came across as trying really hard to hit all my talking points. It didn't help that Career Services said things like, "you need to make sure that you stand out among the 20 people each interviewer meets". The worst part is that I am a good conversationalist, and I feel like I am naturally a good interviewer. In this case, I tried too hard, thought myself into the ground, and didn't perform as well as I should have.

Generally, I don't think that my approach was a positive. You are qualified by the strength of your resume and transcript. The questions about it are not challenges that you need to meet. Your answers don't need to stand up to critical scrutiny. You are having a conversation, which for practical reasons tends to be about legal subjects, but it is first and foremost a social exercise. It may be scary to take that "one shot" and use it as a plain old relaxed conversation, especially for a firm that you really want, but in the end it's a numbers game, and you'll get callbacks that way.

I talk a big game, but I haven't tried my new attitude yet. I have my first and most important CB today, and I hope that it works. I don't know if you're suffering from the same mistakes that I was, but there were enough similarities in the description that I thought I'd share.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby shock259 » Wed Aug 22, 2012 9:10 am

BaiAilian2013 wrote:You don't need a high-risk, high-reward strategy. You just need to TRY HARDER. You think the rest of us are naturally upbeat, enthusiastic people? Go stand in the bathroom mirror and try on likable personalities until you find one you can fit into.


This. I'm so damn tired of smiling, but you have to play the game. Smile, act confident, and prepare your answers.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby kwais » Wed Aug 22, 2012 9:26 am

Anonymous User wrote: Finally, I said to a friend who had been an OCI interviewer at a firm, that rather than looking at my resume, or critiquing me in a mock interview to determine whether there was a problem, he should assume that there was a problem and tell me what it might be. Once he thought about it in that light, he suggested that I was probably overprepared, too intense, and that I talk too quickly. Though he wasn't there for my interviews, I am pretty sure he was right. I went in with the mindset that this is the one chance to impress them with my work ethic and knowledge of the firm and the law. I felt constrained by the 20 minute interview time, so I talked very fast trying to get as much info as possible across. I had prepared answers to classic questions, and in retrospect, I'm sure it came across as trying really hard to hit all my talking points. It didn't help that Career Services said things like, "you need to make sure that you stand out among the 20 people each interviewer meets". The worst part is that I am a good conversationalist, and I feel like I am naturally a good interviewer. In this case, I tried too hard, thought myself into the ground, and didn't perform as well as I should have.


I think this is it. I had too many friends go into OCI with binders full of notes about firms and interviewers, memorizing the firm's ins and outs so they could prove their knowledge. My best and most successful interviews had little to no mention of the firm, my specific interests in law or stock interview questions like strengths or obstacles. They were about sports, music, or rando subjects.
If you can pull it off the internet, its not impressive. Anyone can do that. If you feel like you are giving a canned answer, you probably sound that way too.
The problem I think with mock interviews is that no one is going to say "you were well prepared, very knowledgeable and enthusiastic, but I just didn't enjoy my time with you as much as I could have." Interviewers are just people and you should treat them that way.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 9:43 am

OP: What city are you targeting?

Something also seems strange about your post. Isn't UVA the only T14 that has a preselect dominated OCI?

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:05 am

Something that can absolutely kill you is appearing apathetic about law or biglaw. You need to find a proper balance between bullshit and apathy and spin your answer.

It sounds like you went straight through. For example, you could say that in all honesty, you went to law school on a bit of a whim, and because you knew you liked writing from your history major (there's the honesty part). Then say, however, you are really glad you made that decision. The classes were incredibly interesting, you loved x,y and x extracurriculars that let you see the practice of law, you loved the mock oral argument or paper you wrote, and since speaking to various attorneys you are quite convinced that you will love being a litigator.

Or whatever your story is.

But so many law students blatantly come off as people who: 1) have no idea why they want to be in biglaw, or with that particular firm (don't be the kid telling Quinn you want to do corporate), 2) are just doing it to payback loans, etc.

good luck on the rest.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby sadsituationJD » Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:21 am

Once again, this thread just utterly NAILS why you pathetic, grovelling dipshits are in lawschool: you couldn't come close to hacking it anywhere else. Law is a dumpster for those too stupid for hard math/science, too gutless and socially inept for sales/business, and too wooden, dull and uncreative for art.

I sincerely hope more Biglaw firms go under and a shit-ton of people end up with rescinded offers just like a few years ago. I'll almost guarantee that its going to happen, since the credit markets are gonna go under and all these "deals" are gonna fall thru, hence no need for makework paperpushers like you aspire to be.

User has been warned for being off-topic.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 12:37 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I am seriously underperforming at OCI (about halfway through). Great grades, Law Review, school just below the Top 10.

I tried all day to get candid feedback from those who ought to know and are in a position to tell me (non-law friends, CSO folks whom I know well, someone in student affairs who I know personally), and I haven't heard that I am socially awkward or anything. I really can't figure what went wrong vs. "the firm just liked other students better."

The best advice I have gotten is "act more excited" and "be more genuine." I am a laid-back person, though. My personality isn't going to change overnight, and if I were perfectly genuine, nobody would hire me. Maybe I come across as a phony? Who knows? Anyway, I am going debt free, so I have determined to drop out and "redo" OCI if I strike out. In the meantime, since I have about a dozen interviews left, what are some high risk, high reward interview strategies? Basically, my normal "do everything right" approach isn't working. So I want to go into my next dozen interviews doing something unique that might screw up some of them but might land a callback or two as well (because what I've been doing clearly isn't working).

Anyway, most of my school's OCI is preselect, so the interview matters MUCH more than schools that are lottery.

In the meantime, the CSO is reaching out to several firms on my behalf.

[Sorry for the bad grammar and disorganization. I typed this super drunk, but my interviews were sober, of course]


Passion may be lacking. Show passion about something. It does not have to be law related, they just need to see the twinkle in your eye.

Also, not too sure what underperforming means, if you are halfway through OCI and have 12 more OCI interviews left, I'd say if you have 2-3CBs thus far, you are doing okay, but could do better. Find a way to weave your exciting/interesting resume into your answers for almost anything (at least anything predictable).

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 12:39 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Something that can absolutely kill you is appearing apathetic about law or biglaw. You need to find a proper balance between bullshit and apathy and spin your answer.

It sounds like you went straight through. For example, you could say that in all honesty, you went to law school on a bit of a whim, and because you knew you liked writing from your history major (there's the honesty part). Then say, however, you are really glad you made that decision. The classes were incredibly interesting, you loved x,y and x extracurriculars that let you see the practice of law, you loved the mock oral argument or paper you wrote, and since speaking to various attorneys you are quite convinced that you will love being a litigator.

Or whatever your story is.

But so many law students blatantly come off as people who: 1) have no idea why they want to be in biglaw, or with that particular firm (don't be the kid telling Quinn you want to do corporate), 2) are just doing it to payback loans, etc.

good luck on the rest.


I have a few years of work experience (teaching English in Asia). I honestly don't have any idea why I want to do big law, and the answers I make up sound insincere. I can't be the only one in this situation.

I also did a ton of mass mailing before OCI, got some interviews that way, and also did a job fair. I guess I'm clearly not big law material. To be honest, I am considering staying in school through 2L just because I have a full ride and stipend and no other job prospects and then switching to a Masters of Accounting. Worst case scenario is I'll just go back to teaching English in Asia. I've been pounding the pavement since June, so I'm really almost beyond caring at this point. If it happens, it happens. If it doesn't, my law school will pay me for up to two more years to attend while I figure something else out.

Another option would be to do an LLM in Tax since I really am interested in Tax and then have another OCI. Yet another option is to make up some BS reason for quitting school and then re-enrolling in a year or two and redoing OCI.

I am targeting my home market (Houston) as well as NYC with a few D.C. (which I haven't done yet).

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby somewhatwayward » Wed Aug 22, 2012 12:49 pm

shock259 wrote:
BaiAilian2013 wrote:You don't need a high-risk, high-reward strategy. You just need to TRY HARDER. You think the rest of us are naturally upbeat, enthusiastic people? Go stand in the bathroom mirror and try on likable personalities until you find one you can fit into.


This. I'm so damn tired of smiling, but you have to play the game. Smile, act confident, and prepare your answers.


+1

i am also a fan of practicing answers to stock questions out loud several times and revising and modifying word choice. as i do it, i also see ways i can tie more of my story and experience into the answers.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:29 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Something that can absolutely kill you is appearing apathetic about law or biglaw. You need to find a proper balance between bullshit and apathy and spin your answer.

It sounds like you went straight through. For example, you could say that in all honesty, you went to law school on a bit of a whim, and because you knew you liked writing from your history major (there's the honesty part). Then say, however, you are really glad you made that decision. The classes were incredibly interesting, you loved x,y and x extracurriculars that let you see the practice of law, you loved the mock oral argument or paper you wrote, and since speaking to various attorneys you are quite convinced that you will love being a litigator.

Or whatever your story is.

But so many law students blatantly come off as people who: 1) have no idea why they want to be in biglaw, or with that particular firm (don't be the kid telling Quinn you want to do corporate), 2) are just doing it to payback loans, etc.

good luck on the rest.


I have a few years of work experience (teaching English in Asia). I honestly don't have any idea why I want to do big law, and the answers I make up sound insincere. I can't be the only one in this situation.

I also did a ton of mass mailing before OCI, got some interviews that way, and also did a job fair. I guess I'm clearly not big law material. To be honest, I am considering staying in school through 2L just because I have a full ride and stipend and no other job prospects and then switching to a Masters of Accounting. Worst case scenario is I'll just go back to teaching English in Asia. I've been pounding the pavement since June, so I'm really almost beyond caring at this point. If it happens, it happens. If it doesn't, my law school will pay me for up to two more years to attend while I figure something else out.

Another option would be to do an LLM in Tax since I really am interested in Tax and then have another OCI. Yet another option is to make up some BS reason for quitting school and then re-enrolling in a year or two and redoing OCI.

I am targeting my home market (Houston) as well as NYC with a few D.C. (which I haven't done yet).


Well, what is your answer?

Look, spend some time seriously soul-searching. What, if anything, do you like about the law? Are you attracted to litigation or corporate? Why?

It's expensive for biglaw to train someone. They don't want to hire some asshole who has given this zero thought, and who will quit in 6 months to go be an accountant or teach English in Asia.

That said, you are right that lots of people are in your situation. Fake it till you make it. Give it some actual thought, practice your answers with others, and learn to say it somewhat enthusiastically.

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Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Aug 22, 2012 2:01 pm

sadsituationJD wrote:Once again, this thread just utterly NAILS why you pathetic, grovelling dipshits are in lawschool: you couldn't come close to hacking it anywhere else. Law is a dumpster for those too stupid for hard math/science, too gutless and socially inept for sales/business, and too wooden, dull and uncreative for art.

I sincerely hope more Biglaw firms go under and a shit-ton of people end up with rescinded offers just like a few years ago. I'll almost guarantee that its going to happen, since the credit markets are gonna go under and all these "deals" are gonna fall thru, hence no need for makework paperpushers like you aspire to be.

User has been warned for being off-topic.


LOL, what? Someone is on the bad end of a lot of student debt, huh?

OP: Honestly, "I'm a laid back individual" sounds like code for you coming off as boring, laconic, and/or uninterested. You have to drop that crutch and at least make yourself excited about the potential career.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Wed Aug 22, 2012 2:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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BruceWayne
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Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 9:36 pm

Re: High Risk, High Reward Interviewing Strategies

Postby BruceWayne » Wed Aug 22, 2012 2:25 pm

If you have good grades and law review, it should not be that hard to land callbacks. With the way that law firms hire (essentially on transcript and only secondarily on other factors for most candidates), the bar for a good interview just isn't that high.

What this means is that you are coming across as downright uninterested and likely even have some physical appearance issues ( I don't mean the way you look, but rather, how you are dressed). What exactly are you wearing in these interviews? What fit are you wearing?

One thing that I think people have mentioned that is suprisingly important is to smile. Smile, sit-up straight, and come across as professional. The latter is harder than you might think for someone k-JD because you've never been in a professional environment. What this means is that you should be talking slowly, calmly, and directly. You should be maintaining eye contact and you should not be fidgeting during your interview. Stay still. Further express that law school has shown you how interesting and challenging litigation can be. And that you like the intellectual challenge of coming up with a winning argument. However, mention that as a 2L you have had no exposure to transactional and thus are very curious as to what that practice is like. Explain that you like the idea of all parties working toward a common goal where everyone sees a positive outcome in the end. Further explain that you are also curious about approaching law from a business oriented perspective.




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