Using a biglaw offer as a bargaining chip

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Anonymous User
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Using a biglaw offer as a bargaining chip

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Aug 05, 2012 10:20 pm

Do biglaw offers make you a more attractive candidate for government honors positions?

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Lawquacious
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Re: Using a biglaw offer as a bargaining chip

Postby Lawquacious » Sun Aug 05, 2012 10:25 pm

What consideration (used as a term of art) would they get out of the bargain by you not taking the biglaw offer v. hiring someone else who is otherwise equally qualified? I think mentioning it couldn't hurt because it demonstrates you are desirable in the legal marketplace, but not sure that it would exactly give you leverage of any sort... But I really don't know whether this gives a boost, so maybe someone who does can be more helpful. Good luck regardless.

Anonymous User
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Re: Using a biglaw offer as a bargaining chip

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Aug 05, 2012 11:06 pm

It might actually hurt you-- many agencies want honors candidates to be committed to government service, so trying to use a biglaw offer as leverage might backfire. My school's career services (HYSCCN) has provided data that shows that many federal agencies are less grade-conscious than you might think (including hiring to median, and very occasionally even below), but are highly concerned about "fit", especially with regards to substantive background in the subject area and a background/interest in public service.

Besides, I'm not sure how much leverage you really get-- honors programs are overflowing with highly qualified candidates, and if you have the grades for an honors program, presumably you have the grades for biglaw as well. So I'm not sure how much of a signalling effect your biglaw offer would have, other than the fact that you were reasonably competent as a summer associate.

Don't get me wrong, though-- I think you should list your offer on your resume, if only because not listing it might raise concerns that you were no-offered and are now looking to an honors program as a back-up (which would probably rub a recruiter the wrong way). I might just be reading too much into your use of the term "bargaining chip", which makes it sound like some trump that makes you more attractive than the average candidate, but it's not something that I think will impress most agencies too much.

anon168
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Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:36 pm

Re: Using a biglaw offer as a bargaining chip

Postby anon168 » Sun Aug 05, 2012 11:08 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Do biglaw offers make you a more attractive candidate for government honors positions?


No.




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