Judicial Interns: When people asked you what you learned

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Anonymous User
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Judicial Interns: When people asked you what you learned

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jul 26, 2012 11:57 pm

Just curious about how other judicial interns will answer the following questions:

"What did you learn working in chambers?"
"What type of cases did you work on?"
"What did you like/dislike about working in chambers?"

Also, for questions about substantive work, how much detail can we go into?

Anonymous User
Posts: 273477
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Judicial Interns: When people asked you what you learned

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jul 27, 2012 12:04 am

Anonymous User wrote:Just curious about how other judicial interns will answer the following questions:

"What did you learn working in chambers?"
"What type of cases did you work on?"
"What did you like/dislike about working in chambers?"

Also, for questions about substantive work, how much detail can we go into?


1. It's a lot more challenging to give a balanced neutral opinion of legal issues than I anticipated. It can be really difficult when it pertains to an area where (1) there is not much case law about it, or (2) there is so much written that the legal standard seems to change all the time and there is always a case there against the proposition you're seeking to establish.
2. Foreclosure, IPO, ERISA, unfair competition practices, motions for summary judgment, motions for judgment, motions to dismiss, saw interesting criminal trial.
3. I liked how I got to learn about a lot of new topics that never come up in law school. I feel like I improved my writing, and I am starting to be able to discern what makes an excellent brief. I disliked how my office was very isolated and it wasn't something where I was able to interact with people very often.

I won't go into very much detail about the substantive work. I think speaking about the issues generally is fine though. For cases that are final (like my trial will have a verdict by OCI), I think you can speak about that, but be careful to never have an opinion about the outcome (the clerk told me that).




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