Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
Anonymous User
Posts: 273481
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jul 26, 2012 12:31 am

It was suggested in one of the other threads that transactional lawyers have a higher likelihood of securing an in-house position than those leaving litigation. Is this true?

Also, which post-firm jobs are more litigation oriented? Which are more transaction oriented?

anon168
Posts: 920
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:36 pm

Re: Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby anon168 » Thu Jul 26, 2012 12:41 am

Anonymous User wrote:It was suggested in one of the other threads that transactional lawyers have a higher likelihood of securing an in-house position than those leaving litigation. Is this true?


Yes.

Anonymous User wrote:Also, which post-firm jobs are more litigation oriented? Which are more transaction oriented?


Most in-house openings at corporations will not want litigators. Likely exit options for biglaw litigators are public sector (government) or working for a document management firm providing litigation services.

rad lulz
Posts: 9844
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:53 pm

Re: Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby rad lulz » Thu Jul 26, 2012 12:43 am

Lit boutiques, other large firms. Also I read somewhere like 1/3 of in-house positions are litigation type ones. Also govt.

letsdoit
Posts: 164
Joined: Sun Oct 31, 2010 7:02 pm

Re: Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby letsdoit » Thu Jul 26, 2012 8:33 am

rad lulz wrote:Lit boutiques, other large firms. Also I read somewhere like 1/3 of in-house positions are litigation type ones. Also govt.


TITCR. The Fortune 500 company I'm working in house this summer for has a whole lit department...about 15-20 attorneys.

User avatar
rayiner
Posts: 6184
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2008 11:43 am

Re: Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby rayiner » Thu Jul 26, 2012 8:48 am

It's not really so much that all the in-house positions are corporate, it's that there are way more litigation associates out there than corporate ones. 1/3 of in house jobs are lit, but maybe 2/3 all big law attorneys are lit.

Kochel
Posts: 182
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 2:36 pm

Re: Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby Kochel » Thu Jul 26, 2012 4:49 pm

Also, the in-house litigators are concentrated in certain industries--insurance, manufacturing, etc.--where companies tend to have high litigation activity. In other industries--much of financial services, for example--the ratio of litigators to corporate lawyers is much smaller than 1:2. More like 1:10.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273481
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Jul 26, 2012 4:53 pm

Transactional attorneys work more with large companies and in-house attorneys. When you build those relations, in-house is an easy move.

Litigators, on the other hand, are often one-and-done -- when the case is over, so is your relationship with the client.

That said, both can translate into in-house. Just depends on your network.

azntwice
Posts: 160
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2009 6:46 pm

Re: Litigation vs. Transactional Exit Options

Postby azntwice » Thu Jul 26, 2012 6:14 pm

I was told very recently by a partner at my firm that big companies are now looking for experienced litigators to take in house positions, because ITE people are getting sued left and right. If you are at a biglaw firm that does a lot of litigation for a certain client, you will definitely build a long term relationship with that client, just like in a corporate practice, and you might have the chance to lateral there as well.




Return to “Legal Employment”

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.