How to address associates and partners?

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Anonymous User
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How to address associates and partners?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Mar 31, 2012 10:58 am

I am an international student who will be summering at firm. In my country, we address partners as "partner x" and associates as "associate y." how do you address them in America? I think it would be weird calling them by their first name. is it?

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paratactical
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby paratactical » Sat Mar 31, 2012 11:00 am

Anonymous User wrote:I am an international student who will be summering at firm. In my country, we address partners as "partner x" and associates as "associate y." how do you address them in America? I think it would be weird calling them by their first name. is it?

Do not do that in the United States. Mr. [last name] works for the first time you meet them, but most will tell you to call them by their first name.

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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:00 pm

Partners should be addressed as "your honor" and associates as "comrade"

turbotong
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby turbotong » Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:22 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Partners should be addressed as "your honor" and associates as "comrade"

ROFL. Made me laugh.

2LLLL
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby 2LLLL » Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:39 pm

My style is to lead with Mr./Ms. __________, and then start using the first name when they invariably respond "Call me John/Jane" but you probably wouldn't be going wrong by jumping right to the first name. The way I look at it is that no one is going to be pissed if you call them Mr./Mrs. ____________ the first time you meet them, but you might meet some nutbag partner who is upset that you jumped right to the first name basis

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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:43 pm

Some firms will just tell you. At my SA orientation we were specifically told to call everyone, including partners, by their first name. But I imagine there is a lot of variation from firm to firm.

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KMaine
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby KMaine » Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:46 pm

You should not, under any circumstances, call associates by anything but their first names.

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Big Shrimpin
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby Big Shrimpin » Sat Mar 31, 2012 12:51 pm

"Bro," "dude," and "brO-bama" work just fine.

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rayiner
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby rayiner » Sat Mar 31, 2012 1:11 pm

In the U.S., in conversation, it's almost always appropriate to call someone by their first name, except in limited circumstances:
1) addressing professors ("Professor Smith")
2) addressing your significant others' when meeting for the first time ("Mr. Smith and Mrs. Smith")
3) addressing doctors in a professional setting ("Doctor Smith")
4) addressing judges, pretty much at any time ("Judge Smith" or "Justice Smith")
5) addressing elected legislators ("Senator Smith" or "Congressman Smith")
6) addressing elected executives ("Governor Smith" or "President Smith")
7) addressing clergy in certain religions ("Rabbi Smith")
8 ) addressing a superior military officer (or in similar cases like police or pilots)

When addressing senior coworkers, such as partners or executives, it is acceptable to use "Mr." or "Ms." (never "Mrs." for women) in conversation the first time, until they invariably tell you to call them by their first name. Never use "Mr." or "Ms." with a fellow non-executive, even if they are senior to you.

In written correspondence, it is acceptable to continue to use the honorific, again only for executives and partners. Indeed, it is always appropriate to use "Mr." or "Ms." in written correspondence with anyone with whom you are unfamiliar.

It is almost never appropriate to use a job title as an honorific, except in very limited cases where the honorific happens to coincide with the job title ("President," "Senator," "Congressman," etc).

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JoeFish
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby JoeFish » Sun Apr 01, 2012 12:08 am

Big Shrimpin wrote:"Bro," "dude," and "brO-bama" work just fine.


I've always liked:
"Bro-verachiever"
"Bro-letariat"
"Bro-seidon"
"Bro-asted Chicken"
"Alabama QB Bro-dy Croyle"
"Sodium Bro-mide"

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Big Shrimpin
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby Big Shrimpin » Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:08 am

JoeFish wrote:
Big Shrimpin wrote:"Bro," "dude," and "brO-bama" work just fine.


I've always liked:
"Bro-verachiever"
"Bro-letariat"
"Bro-seidon"
"Bro-asted Chicken"
"Alabama QB Bro-dy Croyle"
"Sodium Bro-mide"


MOAR!

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theavrock
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby theavrock » Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:31 am

Brochocinco
Nabrolean Bronaparte
Zeus King of the Brocean
Broe Namath
Last edited by theavrock on Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

rad lulz
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby rad lulz » Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:40 am

.
Last edited by rad lulz on Mon Apr 22, 2013 11:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

Renzo
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby Renzo » Sun Apr 01, 2012 10:56 am

rayiner wrote:In the U.S., in conversation, it's almost always appropriate to call someone by their first name, except in limited circumstances:
1) addressing professors ("Professor Smith")
2) addressing your significant others' when meeting for the first time ("Mr. Smith and Mrs. Smith")
3) addressing doctors in a professional setting ("Doctor Smith")
4) addressing judges, pretty much at any time ("Judge Smith" or "Justice Smith")
5) addressing elected legislators ("Senator Smith" or "Congressman Smith")
6) addressing elected executives ("Governor Smith" or "President Smith")
7) addressing clergy in certain religions ("Rabbi Smith")
8 ) addressing a superior military officer (or in similar cases like police or pilots)

When addressing senior coworkers, such as partners or executives, it is acceptable to use "Mr." or "Ms." (never "Mrs." for women) in conversation the first time, until they invariably tell you to call them by their first name. Never use "Mr." or "Ms." with a fellow non-executive, even if they are senior to you.

In written correspondence, it is acceptable to continue to use the honorific, again only for executives and partners. Indeed, it is always appropriate to use "Mr." or "Ms." in written correspondence with anyone with whom you are unfamiliar.

It is almost never appropriate to use a job title as an honorific, except in very limited cases where the honorific happens to coincide with the job title ("President," "Senator," "Congressman," etc).


I am going to nominate you for the most helpful person on the internet.

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Big Shrimpin
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby Big Shrimpin » Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:05 am

rad lulz wrote:
theavrock wrote:Zeus King of the Brocean

CHECK YOU GREEK MYTHOLOGY


Good eye, Brometheus.

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theavrock
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby theavrock » Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:29 am

rad lulz wrote:
theavrock wrote:Zeus King of the Brocean

CHECK YOU GREEK MYTHOLOGY


Considering the intoxication levels when these names were created particular attention was not paid to the historical accuracy or lack thereof. Please forgive me Brostradomus

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ben4847
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby ben4847 » Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:36 am

Excuse me! When I'm a JD, you'd better call me "Doctor"!

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KeepitKind
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby KeepitKind » Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:57 am

rayiner wrote:In the U.S., in conversation, it's almost always appropriate to call someone by their first name, except in limited circumstances:
1) addressing professors ("Professor Smith")
2) addressing your significant others' when meeting for the first time ("Mr. Smith and Mrs. Smith")
3) addressing doctors in a professional setting ("Doctor Smith")
4) addressing judges, pretty much at any time ("Judge Smith" or "Justice Smith")
5) addressing elected legislators ("Senator Smith" or "Congressman Smith")
6) addressing elected executives ("Governor Smith" or "President Smith")
7) addressing clergy in certain religions ("Rabbi Smith")
8 ) addressing a superior military officer (or in similar cases like police or pilots)

When addressing senior coworkers, such as partners or executives, it is acceptable to use "Mr." or "Ms." (never "Mrs." for women) in conversation the first time, until they invariably tell you to call them by their first name. Never use "Mr." or "Ms." with a fellow non-executive, even if they are senior to you.

In written correspondence, it is acceptable to continue to use the honorific, again only for executives and partners. Indeed, it is always appropriate to use "Mr." or "Ms." in written correspondence with anyone with whom you are unfamiliar.

It is almost never appropriate to use a job title as an honorific, except in very limited cases where the honorific happens to coincide with the job title ("President," "Senator," "Congressman," etc).


#4 seems a bit misleading.. very few judges in america should be referred to as "Justice" - i believe only judges of a State or Federal Supreme Court, along with trial judges in NY, since its lowest trial court is the Supreme Court of NY. also, addressing them as "Your Honor" is rather common

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wiseowl
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby wiseowl » Sun Apr 01, 2012 12:53 pm

Renzo wrote:
rayiner wrote:In the U.S., in conversation, it's almost always appropriate to call someone by their first name, except in limited circumstances:
1) addressing professors ("Professor Smith")
2) addressing your significant others' when meeting for the first time ("Mr. Smith and Mrs. Smith")
3) addressing doctors in a professional setting ("Doctor Smith")
4) addressing judges, pretty much at any time ("Judge Smith" or "Justice Smith")
5) addressing elected legislators ("Senator Smith" or "Congressman Smith")
6) addressing elected executives ("Governor Smith" or "President Smith")
7) addressing clergy in certain religions ("Rabbi Smith")
8 ) addressing a superior military officer (or in similar cases like police or pilots)

When addressing senior coworkers, such as partners or executives, it is acceptable to use "Mr." or "Ms." (never "Mrs." for women) in conversation the first time, until they invariably tell you to call them by their first name. Never use "Mr." or "Ms." with a fellow non-executive, even if they are senior to you.

In written correspondence, it is acceptable to continue to use the honorific, again only for executives and partners. Indeed, it is always appropriate to use "Mr." or "Ms." in written correspondence with anyone with whom you are unfamiliar.

It is almost never appropriate to use a job title as an honorific, except in very limited cases where the honorific happens to coincide with the job title ("President," "Senator," "Congressman," etc).


I am going to nominate you for the most helpful person on the internet.


Came here to post this. Don't know if it's the pollen or what, but there's been way too much snark and way too little helpful info here lately. XO is that way, kids.

rad lulz
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby rad lulz » Sun Apr 01, 2012 1:39 pm

,
Last edited by rad lulz on Mon Apr 22, 2013 11:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

BeenDidThat
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby BeenDidThat » Sun Apr 01, 2012 3:31 pm

rad lulz wrote:
theavrock wrote:
rad lulz wrote:
theavrock wrote:Zeus King of the Brocean

CHECK YOU GREEK MYTHOLOGY


Considering the intoxication levels when these names were created particular attention was not paid to the historical accuracy or lack thereof. Please forgive me Brostradomus

It's okay broseph. He IS the king of Mt. Brolympus, so we good.


Guys, we oughtn't anger Broseidon, King of the Brocean.

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paratactical
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby paratactical » Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:12 pm

theavrock wrote:
Considering the intoxication levels when these names were created particular attention was not paid to the historical accuracy or lack thereof. Please forgive me Brostradomus

While your documentation of these is quite good, Bronest Hemingway, don't front like you made 'em up.

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theavrock
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby theavrock » Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:19 pm

paratactical wrote:
theavrock wrote:
Considering the intoxication levels when these names were created particular attention was not paid to the historical accuracy or lack thereof. Please forgive me Brostradomus

While your documentation of these is quite good, Bronest Hemingway, don't front like you made 'em up.


Truth. I should have made it clear Zeus King of the Brocean was the only original. Thanks for putting me in line Broseph Stalin.

Renzo
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby Renzo » Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:52 pm

KeepitKind wrote:
rayiner wrote:In the U.S., in conversation, it's almost always appropriate to call someone by their first name, except in limited circumstances:
1) addressing professors ("Professor Smith")
2) addressing your significant others' when meeting for the first time ("Mr. Smith and Mrs. Smith")
3) addressing doctors in a professional setting ("Doctor Smith")
4) addressing judges, pretty much at any time ("Judge Smith" or "Justice Smith")
5) addressing elected legislators ("Senator Smith" or "Congressman Smith")
6) addressing elected executives ("Governor Smith" or "President Smith")
7) addressing clergy in certain religions ("Rabbi Smith")
8 ) addressing a superior military officer (or in similar cases like police or pilots)

When addressing senior coworkers, such as partners or executives, it is acceptable to use "Mr." or "Ms." (never "Mrs." for women) in conversation the first time, until they invariably tell you to call them by their first name. Never use "Mr." or "Ms." with a fellow non-executive, even if they are senior to you.

In written correspondence, it is acceptable to continue to use the honorific, again only for executives and partners. Indeed, it is always appropriate to use "Mr." or "Ms." in written correspondence with anyone with whom you are unfamiliar.

It is almost never appropriate to use a [ERROR: 404] title as an honorific, except in very limited cases where the honorific happens to coincide with the [ERROR: 404] title ("President," "Senator," "Congressman," etc).


#4 seems a bit misleading.. very few judges in america should be referred to as "Justice" - i believe only judges of a State or Federal Supreme Court, along with trial judges in NY, since its lowest trial court is the Supreme Court of NY. also, addressing them as "Your Honor" is rather common


I don't think it's misleading at all; a judge is "your honor" in court (never "Judge"), and always "Judge ____" outside of it.

It's one of the few honorifics that you would use socially or professionally. If I were introducing myself at a reception, I would say, "Judge ____." I wouldn't say, "Your Honor, it's a pleasure to meet you."

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salsahips
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Re: How to address associates and partners?

Postby salsahips » Fri Apr 13, 2012 1:54 am

Renzo wrote:
rayiner wrote:In the U.S., in conversation, it's almost always appropriate to call someone by their first name, except in limited circumstances:
1) addressing professors ("Professor Smith")
2) addressing your significant others' when meeting for the first time ("Mr. Smith and Mrs. Smith")
3) addressing doctors in a professional setting ("Doctor Smith")
4) addressing judges, pretty much at any time ("Judge Smith" or "Justice Smith")
5) addressing elected legislators ("Senator Smith" or "Congressman Smith")
6) addressing elected executives ("Governor Smith" or "President Smith")
7) addressing clergy in certain religions ("Rabbi Smith")
8 ) addressing a superior military officer (or in similar cases like police or pilots)

When addressing senior coworkers, such as partners or executives, it is acceptable to use "Mr." or "Ms." (never "Mrs." for women) in conversation the first time, until they invariably tell you to call them by their first name. Never use "Mr." or "Ms." with a fellow non-executive, even if they are senior to you.

In written correspondence, it is acceptable to continue to use the honorific, again only for executives and partners. Indeed, it is always appropriate to use "Mr." or "Ms." in written correspondence with anyone with whom you are unfamiliar.

It is almost never appropriate to use a job title as an honorific, except in very limited cases where the honorific happens to coincide with the job title ("President," "Senator," "Congressman," etc).


I am going to nominate you for the most helpful person on the internet.


Good Guy Greg candidate.




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