3L Public Defender Applications

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 10, 2014 12:47 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Any offers go out yet?


Yeah...any news? Anyone? Anyone?


Contra Costa (CA) has given at least some offers.
Alameda has given callbacks.
Bronx has given callbacks.
Miami has given first-wave callbacks.


Wait, really on Alameda? They didn't even post the opening until Nov. 21 (after bar results came out) and they're already doing callbacks? Deadline for apps isn't until Jan. 9. Or am I looking at the wrong thing?

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 10, 2014 1:44 pm

Tanicius wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:While we all (well, most of us) wait for any news, can we have a lively discussion on the definitive ranking of PD office reputation? I know most of us actually have no idea what we're talking about, but I for one feel like beyond Bronx/PDS being the best, I don't know what falls into, say, the top 10

Discuss.


It's a meaningless exercise. Top 10 offices for what, exactly? Moving elsewhere across the country? Beyond a few offices -- less than even one handful -- employers aren't going to sit there stacking your pedigree like it's a mathematical equation. Actual demonstrated experience is far more important. If you took five violent felony cases all the way to trial in a super backwater, underfunded part-time-only office in Nowhere, Alabama your first two years as a public defender, you could be a lot more qualified than someone who wrote motions and took an open-bottle case to trial in their first two years as a PD at PDS. It totally depends on what kind of lawyer your new office wants and what kind of experience they value.

Maybe the new office wants experience with Spanish-speaking clients. That might bump your experience at Miami PD up to the top. But oh, also, they don't like theory-of-innocence approaches to litigation, so that bumps your Miami resume down some notches. But wait, you explain, to them -- that's just a generalization, you never litigated in that manner, and you prefer academic and reasonable-doubt approaches to litigation. Well, okay, they say, now you're going back up. But then they decide that they really don't want a big-city lawyer who will leave their office for a bigger city in their same state a few years down the road, so they nix you. See how the Miami line on your resume could have almost no impact on their decision?


It all depends on what you're looking to move to. Federal public defender offices heavily look at the quality of the PD office you worked at, and that's generally city specific (e.g. the federal public defender will know some of the more senior attorneys at the local PDs office and will have an idea of the type of representation that the office gives). Having worked at PDS is definitely a plus as just about any FPD office because they all know that PDS is really good (unlike the rural, under-funded Alabama position), and the FPD offices tend to want someone who is capable of lawyering the hell out of not so great (and often times complicated) cases. Even if you wind up with 5 felony trials in Nowhere, Alabama, you're not going to get the training there that you will at PDS. Also, PDS only handles the most serious felony cases in DC (almost all misdemeanors go to CJA attorneys), so the notion that you might be working on more serious cases in Nowhere, Alabama, but working on low end misdemeanors at PDS isn't very likely. However, the analysis is different if you're trying to move to a local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama (it wouldn't surprise me if they didn't even know about PDS's reputation there), but in terms of career progression, I can't understand why anyone would move from a PD office like PDS to the local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 10, 2014 1:47 pm

Has anyone received an interview for the appellate attorney position at PDS yet?

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Tanicius
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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Tanicius » Wed Dec 10, 2014 1:59 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Tanicius wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:While we all (well, most of us) wait for any news, can we have a lively discussion on the definitive ranking of PD office reputation? I know most of us actually have no idea what we're talking about, but I for one feel like beyond Bronx/PDS being the best, I don't know what falls into, say, the top 10

Discuss.


It's a meaningless exercise. Top 10 offices for what, exactly? Moving elsewhere across the country? Beyond a few offices -- less than even one handful -- employers aren't going to sit there stacking your pedigree like it's a mathematical equation. Actual demonstrated experience is far more important. If you took five violent felony cases all the way to trial in a super backwater, underfunded part-time-only office in Nowhere, Alabama your first two years as a public defender, you could be a lot more qualified than someone who wrote motions and took an open-bottle case to trial in their first two years as a PD at PDS. It totally depends on what kind of lawyer your new office wants and what kind of experience they value.

Maybe the new office wants experience with Spanish-speaking clients. That might bump your experience at Miami PD up to the top. But oh, also, they don't like theory-of-innocence approaches to litigation, so that bumps your Miami resume down some notches. But wait, you explain, to them -- that's just a generalization, you never litigated in that manner, and you prefer academic and reasonable-doubt approaches to litigation. Well, okay, they say, now you're going back up. But then they decide that they really don't want a big-city lawyer who will leave their office for a bigger city in their same state a few years down the road, so they nix you. See how the Miami line on your resume could have almost no impact on their decision?


It all depends on what you're looking to move to. Federal public defender offices heavily look at the quality of the PD office you worked at, and that's generally city specific (e.g. the federal public defender will know some of the more senior attorneys at the local PDs office and will have an idea of the type of representation that the office gives). Having worked at PDS is definitely a plus as just about any FPD office because they all know that PDS is really good (unlike the rural, under-funded Alabama position), and the FPD offices tend to want someone who is capable of lawyering the hell out of not so great (and often times complicated) cases. Even if you wind up with 5 felony trials in Nowhere, Alabama, you're not going to get the training there that you will at PDS. Also, PDS only handles the most serious felony cases in DC (almost all misdemeanors go to CJA attorneys), so the notion that you might be working on more serious cases in Nowhere, Alabama, but working on low end misdemeanors at PDS isn't very likely. However, the analysis is different if you're trying to move to a local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama (it wouldn't surprise me if they didn't even know about PDS's reputation there), but in terms of career progression, I can't understand why anyone would move from a PD office like PDS to the local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama.


Nobody's saying it's wise to pick an underfunded office without a lot of training over a famous office. I'm just illustrating how it's comparing apples and oranges to try to "rank" offices. What you are ranking totally depends on what your particular new employer is looking for. And it's not like law school where Harvard students are almost always going to have an edge over Georgetown students. There's no equivalent tier system where someone's gonna see you worked at Bronx and auto-choose you over the guy from San Francisco County. There are just a bunch of offices that carry name recognition, and that recognition will either register with your future employer or it won't. They're not sitting there splitting hairs thinking, "Well, Bronx is just better than New Orleans." A year out of school, employers care about what you did and what references can tell them about how you work with others. If you're trying to market yourself for a specific kind of advocacy style, then fine, having an office known for that advocacy style will help you in the future if you want change offices. But to waste time thinking about whether PDS will be objectively more portable than Bronx or Miami five years into your career is stupid.

There's a huge tendency on this site to hierarchic-ize everything, and this just isn't a subject you can do it for. Cook County and Los Angeles County, for example, are two examples of offices that don't make headlines like SF or PDS or Bronx, but there are literally hundreds of amazing attorneys who work in those two county offices. The same holds true for cities like Oakland, Atlanta, Palm Beach, St. Louis, Houston/Dallas, and smaller cities like Indianapolis, Louisville, Oklahoma City, or San Antonio. An attorney from the Bronx could be either amazing or terrible at a more ramshackle environment like New Orleans -- the only way to know would be to get to know the individual person and what kind of worker they are. Without knowing more about an individual attorney, I would absolutely challenge anyone who assumed a PDS vet is going to be better in a vacuum than, say, a vet from Detroit, or Charleston.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 10, 2014 2:11 pm

Tanicius wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Tanicius wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:While we all (well, most of us) wait for any news, can we have a lively discussion on the definitive ranking of PD office reputation? I know most of us actually have no idea what we're talking about, but I for one feel like beyond Bronx/PDS being the best, I don't know what falls into, say, the top 10

Discuss.


It's a meaningless exercise. Top 10 offices for what, exactly? Moving elsewhere across the country? Beyond a few offices -- less than even one handful -- employers aren't going to sit there stacking your pedigree like it's a mathematical equation. Actual demonstrated experience is far more important. If you took five violent felony cases all the way to trial in a super backwater, underfunded part-time-only office in Nowhere, Alabama your first two years as a public defender, you could be a lot more qualified than someone who wrote motions and took an open-bottle case to trial in their first two years as a PD at PDS. It totally depends on what kind of lawyer your new office wants and what kind of experience they value.

Maybe the new office wants experience with Spanish-speaking clients. That might bump your experience at Miami PD up to the top. But oh, also, they don't like theory-of-innocence approaches to litigation, so that bumps your Miami resume down some notches. But wait, you explain, to them -- that's just a generalization, you never litigated in that manner, and you prefer academic and reasonable-doubt approaches to litigation. Well, okay, they say, now you're going back up. But then they decide that they really don't want a big-city lawyer who will leave their office for a bigger city in their same state a few years down the road, so they nix you. See how the Miami line on your resume could have almost no impact on their decision?


It all depends on what you're looking to move to. Federal public defender offices heavily look at the quality of the PD office you worked at, and that's generally city specific (e.g. the federal public defender will know some of the more senior attorneys at the local PDs office and will have an idea of the type of representation that the office gives). Having worked at PDS is definitely a plus as just about any FPD office because they all know that PDS is really good (unlike the rural, under-funded Alabama position), and the FPD offices tend to want someone who is capable of lawyering the hell out of not so great (and often times complicated) cases. Even if you wind up with 5 felony trials in Nowhere, Alabama, you're not going to get the training there that you will at PDS. Also, PDS only handles the most serious felony cases in DC (almost all misdemeanors go to CJA attorneys), so the notion that you might be working on more serious cases in Nowhere, Alabama, but working on low end misdemeanors at PDS isn't very likely. However, the analysis is different if you're trying to move to a local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama (it wouldn't surprise me if they didn't even know about PDS's reputation there), but in terms of career progression, I can't understand why anyone would move from a PD office like PDS to the local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama.


Nobody's saying it's wise to pick an underfunded office without a lot of training over a famous office. I'm just illustrating how it's comparing apples and oranges to try to "rank" offices. What you are ranking totally depends on what your particular new employer is looking for. And it's not like law school where Harvard students are almost always going to have an edge over Georgetown students. There's no equivalent tier system where someone's gonna see you worked at Bronx and auto-choose you over the guy from San Francisco County. There are just a bunch of offices that carry name recognition, and that recognition will either register with your future employer or it won't. They're not sitting there splitting hairs thinking, "Well, Bronx is just better than New Orleans." A year out of school, employers care about what you did and what references can tell them about how you work with others. If you're trying to market yourself for a specific kind of advocacy style, then fine, having an office known for that advocacy style will help you in the future if you want change offices. But to waste time thinking about whether PDS will be objectively more portable than Bronx or Miami five years into your career is stupid.

There's a huge tendency on this site to hierarchic-ize everything, and this just isn't a subject you can do it for. Cook County and Los Angeles County, for example, are two examples of offices that don't make headlines like SF or PDS or Bronx, but there are literally hundreds of amazing attorneys who work in those two county offices. The same holds true for cities like Oakland, Atlanta, Palm Beach, St. Louis, Houston/Dallas, and smaller cities like Indianapolis, Louisville, Oklahoma City, or San Antonio. An attorney from the Bronx could be either amazing or terrible at a more ramshackle environment like New Orleans -- the only way to know would be to get to know the individual person and what kind of worker they are. Without knowing more about an individual attorney, I would absolutely challenge anyone who assumed a PDS vet is going to be better in a vacuum than, say, a vet from Detroit, or Charleston.


OP, here.

I realize this isn't a perfect question (which is why there's no clear answer) but what I meant was, other offices that offer what PDS and Bronx do in terms of reputation, training, and potential career development. Say you have no idea where you want to end up, and you just want to give yourself the best possible chance at having a strong career as a PD (or even potentially moving to other very reputable offices). I'm not asking about backwater PD offices, but nationally recognized offices. When law school advisors meet up to talk about PD hiring, what offices are the best in those conversations? That's what I'm getting at. Like does OPD have a stronger reputation than Colorado? Is Legal Aid stronger than NJ? (not specifically, but generally).

Obviously career development is more about the individual than about prestige/reputation -- but which offices, outside of PDS/Bronx will put you in the best position? Or even beyond that, what are the factors that push Bronx/PDS into the spotlight rather than other offices? I'm not asking for a scientific rundown, but a gut instinct sort of thing.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Wed Dec 10, 2014 2:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Tanicius
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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Tanicius » Wed Dec 10, 2014 2:14 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
OP, here.

I realize this isn't a perfect question (which is why there's no clear answer) but what I meant was, other offices that offer what PDS and Bronx do in terms of reputation, training, and potential career development. Say you have no idea where you want to end up, and you just want to give yourself the best possible chance at having a strong career as a PD (or even potentially moving to other very reputable offices). I'm not asking about backwater PD offices, but nationally recognized offices. When law school advisors meet up to talk about PD hiring, what offices are the best in those conversations? That's what I'm getting at. Like does OPD have a stronger reputation than Colorado? Is Legal Aid stronger than NJ? (not specifically, but generally).

Obviously career development is more about the individual than about prestige/reputation -- but which offices, outside of PDS/Bronx will put you in the best position?


If you're asking about getting a job based on internship experience, these offices have definitely helped:

- Bronx
- PDS
- Miami
- San Francisco
- OPD

California is more insular. For CA offices, it helps primarily to intern at the office you actually want to work at, and beyond that, Contra Costa, Alameda, Santa Clara, Solano, SF and LA counties are just the ones that often give out consistent summer internships.

Beyond that, it's going to come down to the employer's awareness of what quality of work other offices are known for. A lot of employers, for example, probably aren't going to mince the difference between Bronx/LAS/BDS/Harlem -- they're just going to see NYC.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:29 pm

Tanicius wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Tanicius wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:While we all (well, most of us) wait for any news, can we have a lively discussion on the definitive ranking of PD office reputation? I know most of us actually have no idea what we're talking about, but I for one feel like beyond Bronx/PDS being the best, I don't know what falls into, say, the top 10

Discuss.


It's a meaningless exercise. Top 10 offices for what, exactly? Moving elsewhere across the country? Beyond a few offices -- less than even one handful -- employers aren't going to sit there stacking your pedigree like it's a mathematical equation. Actual demonstrated experience is far more important. If you took five violent felony cases all the way to trial in a super backwater, underfunded part-time-only office in Nowhere, Alabama your first two years as a public defender, you could be a lot more qualified than someone who wrote motions and took an open-bottle case to trial in their first two years as a PD at PDS. It totally depends on what kind of lawyer your new office wants and what kind of experience they value.

Maybe the new office wants experience with Spanish-speaking clients. That might bump your experience at Miami PD up to the top. But oh, also, they don't like theory-of-innocence approaches to litigation, so that bumps your Miami resume down some notches. But wait, you explain, to them -- that's just a generalization, you never litigated in that manner, and you prefer academic and reasonable-doubt approaches to litigation. Well, okay, they say, now you're going back up. But then they decide that they really don't want a big-city lawyer who will leave their office for a bigger city in their same state a few years down the road, so they nix you. See how the Miami line on your resume could have almost no impact on their decision?


It all depends on what you're looking to move to. Federal public defender offices heavily look at the quality of the PD office you worked at, and that's generally city specific (e.g. the federal public defender will know some of the more senior attorneys at the local PDs office and will have an idea of the type of representation that the office gives). Having worked at PDS is definitely a plus as just about any FPD office because they all know that PDS is really good (unlike the rural, under-funded Alabama position), and the FPD offices tend to want someone who is capable of lawyering the hell out of not so great (and often times complicated) cases. Even if you wind up with 5 felony trials in Nowhere, Alabama, you're not going to get the training there that you will at PDS. Also, PDS only handles the most serious felony cases in DC (almost all misdemeanors go to CJA attorneys), so the notion that you might be working on more serious cases in Nowhere, Alabama, but working on low end misdemeanors at PDS isn't very likely. However, the analysis is different if you're trying to move to a local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama (it wouldn't surprise me if they didn't even know about PDS's reputation there), but in terms of career progression, I can't understand why anyone would move from a PD office like PDS to the local PD's office in Nowhere, Alabama.


Nobody's saying it's wise to pick an underfunded office without a lot of training over a famous office. I'm just illustrating how it's comparing apples and oranges to try to "rank" offices. What you are ranking totally depends on what your particular new employer is looking for. And it's not like law school where Harvard students are almost always going to have an edge over Georgetown students. There's no equivalent tier system where someone's gonna see you worked at Bronx and auto-choose you over the guy from San Francisco County. There are just a bunch of offices that carry name recognition, and that recognition will either register with your future employer or it won't. They're not sitting there splitting hairs thinking, "Well, Bronx is just better than New Orleans." A year out of school, employers care about what you did and what references can tell them about how you work with others. If you're trying to market yourself for a specific kind of advocacy style, then fine, having an office known for that advocacy style will help you in the future if you want change offices. But to waste time thinking about whether PDS will be objectively more portable than Bronx or Miami five years into your career is stupid.

There's a huge tendency on this site to hierarchic-ize everything, and this just isn't a subject you can do it for. Cook County and Los Angeles County, for example, are two examples of offices that don't make headlines like SF or PDS or Bronx, but there are literally hundreds of amazing attorneys who work in those two county offices. The same holds true for cities like Oakland, Atlanta, Palm Beach, St. Louis, Houston/Dallas, and smaller cities like Indianapolis, Louisville, Oklahoma City, or San Antonio. An attorney from the Bronx could be either amazing or terrible at a more ramshackle environment like New Orleans -- the only way to know would be to get to know the individual person and what kind of worker they are. Without knowing more about an individual attorney, I would absolutely challenge anyone who assumed a PDS vet is going to be better in a vacuum than, say, a vet from Detroit, or Charleston.


This is absolutely true.

But I will note that Cook County PD is frequently cited as an office where the assistants have entirely too large of caseloads and spend too little time on each case. Pay isn't particularly great either, so a lot of attorneys are unwilling to work more than their 8 hours a day. The office is frequently criticized as providing inadequate representation for those reasons. The union there sounds objectively terrible as well. Based on a conversion I had with an attorney there, the office literally shreds every 4 out of 5 applications before opening the 5th application (this is somehow its way of randomizing hiring). (In other words, it doesn't matter that you went to YLS and demonstrated commitment to defending indigent defendants because there's a 4 out of 5 chance that no one will ever look at your resume.) It also does promotions based on drawing straws, rather than on merit, so you can be an awesome attorney, but be stuck doing misdemeanors for 8 years with no promotion in sight. Obviously, some people will have better experiences with this part of the union's promotion scheme than others, but it sucks if you're the attorney who works your ass off, kicks butt, and can't get promoted simply because you didn't draw the right straw. Also, the office tends to do these large "hiring" sessions, where they hire something like 5 people out of their 500 applicants (they leave the job postings open for a long time) and tell another 20 that they will hire them when they are able to, will wait years to call that person, and will expect that person to start in a couple weeks if s/he still wants to work there.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Scruffy_the_Janitor » Wed Dec 10, 2014 8:34 pm

:cry: Didn't see any offices I'm interviewing at mentioned. Speaking of which, did anyone else interview with New Hampshire? Thoughts?

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:07 pm

Any updates on New Orleans? They seem pretty quiet.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:23 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Any updates on New Orleans? They seem pretty quiet.


They have extended some invites for final interviews..I think they move in waves though

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 12:06 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Any updates on New Orleans? They seem pretty quiet.


They have extended some invites for final interviews..I think they move in waves though


Do you know when people were contacted? What method was used? Thanks!

Anyone have info on Mecklenburg? They have also been quiet!

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 12:30 am

Mecklenburg has been quiet..this wait is killing me

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 8:53 am

OPD -- phone and then email (from EJW mid-Nov)

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Any updates on New Orleans? They seem pretty quiet.


They have extended some invites for final interviews..I think they move in waves though


Do you know when people were contacted? What method was used? Thanks!

Anyone have info on Mecklenburg? They have also been quiet!

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 10:22 am

Have the following offices started 1st round interviews:
Philly
Maryland
CPCS
If so, should we consider ourselves out of the running if we have heard?

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 10:29 am

Anonymous User wrote:Have the following offices started 1st round interviews:
Philly
Maryland
CPCS
If so, should we consider ourselves out of the running if we have heard?


Philly has panel interviews this month and next, people have been contacted, either by phone or email

Maryland is interviewing but not new lawyers

Cpcs is doing oci at some schools, like Harvard for example..idk if they are interviewing at their office

..I wouldn't consider yourself out of the running

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 12:10 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Anyone know if Spanish is required for San Diego Fed Defenders? The application says Spanish 'preferred' but I'm thinking it's code for 'required.'


Does anyone know how many people Federal Defenders of San Diego usually hires?

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby anon sequitur » Thu Dec 11, 2014 3:58 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Anyone know if Spanish is required for San Diego Fed Defenders? The application says Spanish 'preferred' but I'm thinking it's code for 'required.'


Does anyone know how many people Federal Defenders of San Diego usually hires?


On the EJW application, it said they were hiring four, though it's not clear if that means they would consider hiring up to four from EJW, or four for the entire year. It probably means the latter.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 4:12 pm

Only four? And you're probably right, four out of the entire applicant pool.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 8:36 pm

Just got an offer from Colorado. So.freaking.pumped!

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 9:42 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Just got an offer from Colorado. So.freaking.pumped!


Congrats! did you apply via EJW?

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 10:02 pm

Congratulations! How did they notify you?

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby ash0117 » Thu Dec 11, 2014 10:15 pm

Anonymous User wrote:OPD -- phone and then email (from EJW mid-Nov)

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Any updates on New Orleans? They seem pretty quiet.


They have extended some invites for final interviews..I think they move in waves though


Do you know when people were contacted? What method was used? Thanks!

Anyone have info on Mecklenburg? They have also been quiet!


Wait was this your first interview post EJW or your second?

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Dec 11, 2014 11:30 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Just got an offer from Colorado. So.freaking.pumped!


Congrats! did you apply via EJW?


I did not apply via EJW, just did a direct application.

Anonymous User wrote:Congratulations! How did they notify you?


I received my offer via email, with the offer letter as an attachment. It actually looks like it was drafted a couple of days before it was actually sent, and that is probably a good thing or else I would have lost all focus during finals.

I am really surprised offers are going out this early because it looks like past offers didn't start until early January or so. Definitely a welcome Xmas present!

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Dec 12, 2014 9:37 am

Anonymous User wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Anyone know if Spanish is required for San Diego Fed Defenders? The application says Spanish 'preferred' but I'm thinking it's code for 'required.'


Does anyone know how many people Federal Defenders of San Diego usually hires?


Did they already extend offers for their new class? If so, congratulations to the lucky 4. I never heard back one way or another after EJW.

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Re: 3L Public Defender Applications

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Dec 12, 2014 10:29 am

Scruffy_the_Janitor wrote::cry: Didn't see any offices I'm interviewing at mentioned. Speaking of which, did anyone else interview with New Hampshire? Thoughts?


I did my 2nd interview with NH back in August. IMO panels are always rough because they are designed to be. Everyone I have spoken to that works there voiced similar sentiments.




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