Bar Reciprocity Question

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PeanutHead
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Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby PeanutHead » Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:35 pm

I'm admittedly pretty ignorant on this issue. Working in DC, and from what I understand DC basically waives in any bar admission. Is there any advantage to taking NY or CA aside from not having to re-take the bar if I end up working there? I hope to stay long term in DC, but who knows what will happen--How massive of a pain in the ass is it to take a different bar exam down the road?

Basically I'll take any advice on this issue.

shastaca
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby shastaca » Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:49 pm

Candidates for admission may be admitted without sitting for the exam if candidate received a scaled MBE score of 133 or higher on an exam upon which candidate was admitted in another jurisdiction, achieved a scaled score of at least 75 on the MPRE, and has a JD from an ABA accredited law school. If a candidate received a 133 on the MBE but was not admitted in that jurisdiction, candidate may waive in MBE score and take only the essay portions of the exam. A candidate must then score a 133 on the essay portion to pass the exam.
http://www.thebarexam.com/dcbarexam.htm

Anonymous Loser
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby Anonymous Loser » Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:50 pm

Are you going to be able to satisfy CA/NY CLE requirements without a lot of struggling?

I would suspect admission in a neighboring state would be more useful, and a great deal easier to maintain.

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snowpeach06
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby snowpeach06 » Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:58 pm

I was wondering this as well. Does anyone know how hard/easy it is to get the required score for reciprocity? And can't you just take your CLE's in DC?

PeanutHead
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby PeanutHead » Mon Oct 17, 2011 10:06 pm

I guess I was overestimating the importance of taking NY/CA. I looked at the attorney profiles for the firm I'm going to and everyone has either just DC or MD/VA and DC. Kind of surprised, but not the first time I was totally off base with regard to something like this. Guess I should be glad I can go the slacker route for once and take the MD bar while my buddies are taking NY.

In response to snowpeach- I'm pretty sure you can just take your CLE's in DC. But from what I understand the standard is so low that you may as well take your exam in MD/VA or wherever and whatever "qualifying" score you get there will be more than enough for DC.

Renzo
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby Renzo » Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:22 pm

PeanutHead wrote:I guess I was overestimating the importance of taking NY/CA. I looked at the attorney profiles for the firm I'm going to and everyone has either just DC or MD/VA and DC. Kind of surprised, but not the first time I was totally off base with regard to something like this. Guess I should be glad I can go the slacker route for once and take the MD bar while my buddies are taking NY.

In response to snowpeach- I'm pretty sure you can just take your CLE's in DC. But from what I understand the standard is so low that you may as well take your exam in MD/VA or wherever and whatever "qualifying" score you get there will be more than enough for DC.


Some bars don't allow you to have an inactive status (CA does, NY does not), so it would end up costing you like $500 a year just to maintain your license, not including CLE. If you're going to practice in DC, I'd either take MD or VA, since there's inevitably going to be some time when someone needs a filing signed in those jurisdictions.

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snowpeach06
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby snowpeach06 » Tue Oct 18, 2011 8:33 am

I think my only issues is that I kind of forsee moving back to NY one day, so it made sense to take the NY bar. But, if I could hold out 5 years and take the DC bar, I guess that would work as well. Also, DC does have a bar correct, there is no need to take MD/VA?

Renzo
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby Renzo » Tue Oct 18, 2011 7:51 pm

snowpeach06 wrote:I think my only issues is that I kind of forsee moving back to NY one day, so it made sense to take the NY bar. But, if I could hold out 5 years and take the DC bar, I guess that would work as well. Also, DC does have a bar correct, there is no need to take MD/VA?

No, you need to sit for a state's bar and then waive into DC. You can either pick NY or CA if you think it will be useful, or you can pick VA/MD if it will be useful, or you can try and pick the easiest bar in the country if all you care about is waiving into DC.

TooOld4This
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby TooOld4This » Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:45 pm

Renzo wrote:
snowpeach06 wrote:I think my only issues is that I kind of forsee moving back to NY one day, so it made sense to take the NY bar. But, if I could hold out 5 years and take the DC bar, I guess that would work as well. Also, DC does have a bar correct, there is no need to take MD/VA?

No, you need to sit for a state's bar and then waive into DC. You can either pick NY or CA if you think it will be useful, or you can pick VA/MD if it will be useful, or you can try and pick the easiest bar in the country if all you care about is waiving into DC.


This is incorrect. DC has its own bar. If you are planning on practicing in DC, your firm may have a preference for you to take DC, since the waive in process takes quite a long while. (Most won't keep you from taking another state, though.)

Renzo
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby Renzo » Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:17 pm

TooOld4This wrote:
Renzo wrote:
snowpeach06 wrote:I think my only issues is that I kind of forsee moving back to NY one day, so it made sense to take the NY bar. But, if I could hold out 5 years and take the DC bar, I guess that would work as well. Also, DC does have a bar correct, there is no need to take MD/VA?

No, you need to sit for a state's bar and then waive into DC. You can either pick NY or CA if you think it will be useful, or you can pick VA/MD if it will be useful, or you can try and pick the easiest bar in the country if all you care about is waiving into DC.


This is incorrect. DC has its own bar. If you are planning on practicing in DC, your firm may have a preference for you to take DC, since the waive in process takes quite a long while. (Most won't keep you from taking another state, though.)


Huh. Sorry, looks like you are right, and I was mislead.

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snowpeach06
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby snowpeach06 » Wed Oct 19, 2011 7:35 pm

TooOld4This wrote:
Renzo wrote:
snowpeach06 wrote:I think my only issues is that I kind of forsee moving back to NY one day, so it made sense to take the NY bar. But, if I could hold out 5 years and take the DC bar, I guess that would work as well. Also, DC does have a bar correct, there is no need to take MD/VA?

No, you need to sit for a state's bar and then waive into DC. You can either pick NY or CA if you think it will be useful, or you can pick VA/MD if it will be useful, or you can try and pick the easiest bar in the country if all you care about is waiving into DC.


This is incorrect. DC has its own bar. If you are planning on practicing in DC, your firm may have a preference for you to take DC, since the waive in process takes quite a long while. (Most won't keep you from taking another state, though.)

Do you know how long the waive in process takes?

Anonymous Loser
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby Anonymous Loser » Thu Oct 20, 2011 12:38 am

snowpeach06 wrote:Do you know how long the waive in process takes?


The D.C. Bar FAQ's wrote:How long will it take for my application for admission without examination to be processed?
The average processing time is currently eight (8) months, provided the application does not contain character and fitness issues that would require in depth Committee review.

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snowpeach06
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby snowpeach06 » Thu Oct 20, 2011 9:00 am

Anonymous Loser wrote:
snowpeach06 wrote:Do you know how long the waive in process takes?


The D.C. Bar FAQ's wrote:How long will it take for my application for admission without examination to be processed?
The average processing time is currently eight (8) months, provided the application does not contain character and fitness issues that would require in depth Committee review.

Wow, that is a long time. It would be almost a year after I graduate before I can "be a lawyer." Probably should just take the DC bar.

JetSetter68
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby JetSetter68 » Thu Oct 20, 2011 10:49 am

.

RyanJM
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby RyanJM » Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:53 am

Not sure if they have the answer to this in particular, but there's a new site that's much more comprehensive than the juristech or others: SPAM REMOVED. You have to register (free) to see some of the state-specific info but it's amazingly complete.

RyanJM
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Re: Bar Reciprocity Question

Postby RyanJM » Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:59 am

shastaca wrote:Candidates for admission may be admitted without sitting for the exam if candidate received a scaled MBE score of 133 or higher on an exam upon which candidate was admitted in another jurisdiction, achieved a scaled score of at least 75 on the MPRE, and has a JD from an ABA accredited law school. If a candidate received a 133 on the MBE but was not admitted in that jurisdiction, candidate may waive in MBE score and take only the essay portions of the exam. A candidate must then score a 133 on the essay portion to pass the exam.
http://www.thebarexam.com/dcbarexam.htm


SPAM REMOVED has score requirements for all sections of the test for every state. It's arranged in maps so it's super easy, and free, of course.




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