Question about the struggling legal market.

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msuz
Posts: 184
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:17 am

Re: Question about the struggling legal market.

Postby msuz » Tue Oct 11, 2011 10:15 am

Not to sound elitist or anything, but it seems like basically what is going on here is that people with a complex understanding of intelligence are arguing that intelligence is more complicated than status and test scores alone; meanwhile people with a surface understanding of intelligence are really oversimplifying it.

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DoubleChecks
Posts: 2333
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 4:35 pm

Re: Question about the struggling legal market.

Postby DoubleChecks » Tue Oct 11, 2011 10:24 am

msuz wrote:Not to sound elitist or anything, but it seems like basically what is going on here is that people with a complex understanding of intelligence are arguing that intelligence is more complicated than status and test scores alone; meanwhile people with a surface understanding of intelligence are really oversimplifying it.


Oh snap, I think you meant to post in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=167965

Honestly, for a second, I thought I was in that thread lol.

msuz
Posts: 184
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:17 am

Re: Question about the struggling legal market.

Postby msuz » Tue Oct 11, 2011 11:35 am

DoubleChecks wrote:
msuz wrote:Not to sound elitist or anything, but it seems like basically what is going on here is that people with a complex understanding of intelligence are arguing that intelligence is more complicated than status and test scores alone; meanwhile people with a surface understanding of intelligence are really oversimplifying it.


Oh snap, I think you meant to post in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=167965

Honestly, for a second, I thought I was in that thread lol.


lol, I can't post that in that thread, because I wont make it into Harvard.

mrloblaw
Posts: 534
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:00 pm

Re: Question about the struggling legal market.

Postby mrloblaw » Tue Oct 11, 2011 11:37 am

msuz wrote:
DoubleChecks wrote:
msuz wrote:Not to sound elitist or anything, but it seems like basically what is going on here is that people with a complex understanding of intelligence are arguing that intelligence is more complicated than status and test scores alone; meanwhile people with a surface understanding of intelligence are really oversimplifying it.


Oh snap, I think you meant to post in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=167965

Honestly, for a second, I thought I was in that thread lol.


lol, I can't post that in that thread, because I wont make it into Harvard.


I didn't get into Harvard, but the thread is still gold, Jerry, gold!

Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Question about the struggling legal market.

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Oct 11, 2011 7:31 pm

rayiner wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
rayiner wrote:
flcath wrote:Very fair evaluation here, all around. (Though I'm very skeptical that CLS will hit the 70% mark.)


If their internal data is to be believed, they hit the 70% mark last OCI as well. The data I have from NU suggests that we hit the 60% mark. Of course when you factor in no-offers (which wasn't insubstantial this year thanks to fears of double-dip), along with clerkship and government defectors, I predict ~40% actual NLJ250 placement at graduation.


actually it was closer to 80%

~78%.


I saw 70% for C/O 2012. What year is the 78% for?


no thats c/o 2011

I go to CLS and during the prep for this years OCI they told us that last years class (2012) got ~78%. My memory is not that great but it was SIGNIFICANTLY higher than the previous year which was ~70%.

Renzo
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Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 3:23 am

Re: Question about the struggling legal market.

Postby Renzo » Tue Oct 11, 2011 7:55 pm

Julio_El_Chavo wrote:
Renzo wrote:1) there are several very different types of analytic thinking. It's not all fungible. One of the things you learn in medical school is "think like a doctor." They call it clinical decisonmaking; and, like legal analysis, it's an important skill that takes considerable work to master.


I still say there are striking similarities between diagnosing potential legal issues and diagnosing potential health problems. There are reasoning skills common to both professions. The fact of the matter is that med schools are better at limiting enrollment and therefore it's harder to get into medical school. By implication, medical students are smarter than most law students. I realize that you're going to be a lawyer and you want to feel special, but what the vast majority of lawyers do is not difficult. Not everyone is penning exquisite prose in court opinions or writing scholarly articles. Most attorney are doing rote tasks that are extremely repetitive, boring, and low-wattage.


I agree that viewed globally, a lot of legal work is grinding out repetitive motions, or doing DUI appearances; but that's not the work most people on this board aspire to, so I'm talking about higher caliber legal work. By the same token, I think you grossly overestimate what the average doctor does. A great majority, just as with lawyers, as just going through daily motions of grinding out the same old stuff everyday. A lucky few doctors, just like a lucky few lawyers, get to spend a portion of their time doing something more challenging than the everyday grind of well-child visits, acne treatments, DUI defenses, and document review projects.

All that aside, having worked in healthcare for about 11 years, and having passed on the opportunity to go to medical school in favor of law school, I stand by my assertion that the aptitudes that make a really sharp lawyer and a really sharp doctor are quite different. I don't dispute for a second that being a doctor requires more specialized knowledge than does being a lawyer; I don't even dispute that doctors, on average, are probably "smarter" than lawyers. But I don't think that someone who is exceptionally good at either one is likely to be any good at all at the other; they really do require very different ways of approaching problems.




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