Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

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Verity
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby Verity » Sat Jul 16, 2011 3:42 pm

Do not move to Turkey. Write a book and profit.

Renzo
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby Renzo » Sat Jul 16, 2011 3:45 pm

Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?


Here

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JCougar
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby JCougar » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:03 am

quakeroats wrote:
merc280 wrote:this is hilarious. Pretty sad how horrible the condition are for some attorneys who do temp work. Don't really hear much about the dark side of legal jobs. Great insight to how bad it can be.


$32 an hour plus overtime is damn near slave labor.


If you assume that Biglaw associates work 60 hours/week, a $160K salary equates to $53/hour and you don't get overtime.

Or if you convert a first year $160K biglaw salary to what you'd be making if you would get overtime, it's $44/hr for the first 40 hours per week, and $66/hour after that.

So $32/hour and is not that bad, if you get overtime ($46/hour) for all the hours worked past 40. It's basically Biglaw pay rate in smaller markets. The bad part about it is the inconsistent work and the no benefits.

I think people underestimate how Biglaw works you to death, though. It's good money, but you're working so many hours that it's actually not that much money per hour. My mom is a nurse and she makes $41/hour in an area that's less than half the COL as NYC. And that's before she gets her weekend/night shift premiums, which often bump her up to $45. If she were to work 60 hours a week at her job, she'd make more than a Biglaw associate makes their first year, even after they get their bonus. And she never had any college loans to repay.

There's a reason Associate Attorney turnover is so drastically high...once you start actually living the Biglaw lifestyle, you realize that it's not such a cool thing to be working there. If you can make it past your third year (which many people don't do), the raises and the bonuses make it pretty lucrative, especially if you lived frugally for your first 3 and made a significant dent in your school debt. But that's IF you make it.

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Verity
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby Verity » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:07 am

JCougar wrote:
quakeroats wrote:
merc280 wrote:this is hilarious. Pretty sad how horrible the condition are for some attorneys who do temp work. Don't really hear much about the dark side of legal jobs. Great insight to how bad it can be.


$32 an hour plus overtime is damn near slave labor.


If you assume that Biglaw associates work 60 hours/week, a $160K salary equates to $53/hour and you don't get overtime.

Or if you convert a first year $160K biglaw salary to what you'd be making if you would get overtime, it's $44/hr for the first 40 hours per week, and $66/hour after that.

So $32/hour and is not that bad, if you get overtime ($46/hour) for all the hours worked past 40. It's basically Biglaw pay rate in smaller markets. The bad part about it is the inconsistent work and the no benefits.

I think people underestimate how Biglaw works you to death, though. It's good money, but you're working so many hours that it's actually not that much money per hour. My mom is a nurse and she makes $41/hour in an area that's less than half the COL as NYC. And that's before she gets her weekend/night shift premiums, which often bump her up to $45. If she were to work 60 hours a week at her job, she'd make more than a Biglaw associate makes their first year, even after they get their bonus. And she never had any college loans to repay.

There's a reason Associate Attorney turnover is so drastically high...once you start actually living the Biglaw lifestyle, you realize that it's not such a cool thing to be working there. If you can make it past your third year (which many people don't do), the raises and the bonuses make it pretty lucrative, especially if you lived frugally for your first 3 and made a significant dent in your school debt. But that's IF you make it.


Yeah, but Biglaw generally leads somewhere meaningful. Your career probably ends with doc review.

Also, associate turnover doesn't happen just because they don't like it anymore. They get pushed out before making partner.

Still infinitely better than doc review.

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sunynp
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby sunynp » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:20 am

areyouinsane - things are so terrible that you are moving to Turkey? Best of luck to you there. The book deal sound like a good option. Still, don't burn any bridges as you leave.

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thesealocust
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby thesealocust » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:22 am

Verity wrote:Also, associate turnover doesn't happen just because they don't like it anymore. They get pushed out before making partner.


While it depends on the firm, the market, and the associate, my understanding is that a large amount of - and at many places nearly all - associate departure is completely voluntary. People leave because it sucks, and because opportunities with much but hours and/or nearly the same $$$ present themselves. Overt associate layoffs outside of the collapse were basically unheard of, and the huge hiring of big firms was often done to plug the huge waves of voluntary departures. Likewise the massive increase in salary and benefits corresponded to efforts at retaining associates.

Most all of that is very NYC centric (since that's where most biglaw is) but a lot of associate turnover has and does happen "just because they don't like it anymore."

areyouinsane
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby areyouinsane » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:47 am

Doc review temp jobs no longer pay overtime- most of them nowadays are VERY short term- like a week or two- and pay about $25-$30 an hour in NYC. That's flat rate too- even if you work over 40 hours, there is no time & a half. And of course no health benefits or 401K or job security, as well as no chance to build any meaningful skills. It's about as dead end a job as there is. It's also incredibly tedious and mind-numbingly boring.

I haven't heard of any doc review jobs paying OT rates since late 2008 in the NYC area. A decline in work thanks to Indian outsourcing and better software, plus the epic oversupply of lawyers makes paying OT unecessary.

My mom is a part-time dental hygenist and gets $43 an hour in NJ. That is on the high end (she's been w/ the same dentists for 20+ years), but it's still great $$$ for a gig that only requires a 2 year associate's degree. Is it nasty & gross? Of course. But it is far more $$$ than most shitlawyers will ever see for an hour's work, and the shitlawyer has 5 more years of education and likely a lot of student loans.

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drdolittle
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby drdolittle » Sun Jul 17, 2011 1:00 am

areyouinsane wrote:Doc review temp jobs no longer pay overtime- most of them nowadays are VERY short term- like a week or two- and pay about $25-$30 an hour in NYC. That's flat rate too- even if you work over 40 hours, there is no time & a half. And of course no health benefits or 401K or job security, as well as no chance to build any meaningful skills. It's about as dead end a job as there is. It's also incredibly tedious and mind-numbingly boring.

I haven't heard of any doc review jobs paying OT rates since late 2008 in the NYC area. A decline in work thanks to Indian outsourcing and better software, plus the epic oversupply of lawyers makes paying OT unecessary.

My mom is a part-time dental hygenist and gets $43 an hour in NJ. That is on the high end (she's been w/ the same dentists for 20+ years), but it's still great $$$ for a gig that only requires a 2 year associate's degree. Is it nasty & gross? Of course. But it is far more $$$ than most shitlawyers will ever see for an hour's work, and the shitlawyer has 5 more years of education and likely a lot of student loans.

Actually the way you describe it, being a shitlawyer doesn't seem much less nasty & gross than being a hygenist.

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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?h

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Jul 17, 2011 1:05 am

True story: I am a summer at a V5 New York firm, and I just recently got up the courage to ask about our doc review dungeon. I asked in a naive way, and the litigation associates I was talking to all got kind of awkward and quiet as they described being taken on their first tour through the endless maze of cubicles on a floor that looks nothing like the rest of the firm. It was kind of shocking to hear the things from this thread echoed by actual attorneys.

The weirdest part isn't that it's grunt work or unglamorous - that's part of every industry. What's crazy is that the bifurcation between "upwardly mobile" and "stop asking questions and start marking documents as responsive or not" happens before anybody even has a chance to practice law. You're branded before you start, there's no exit to the big law equivalent of the 'mail room' - even though people of the same class year and same law schools are upstairs working for much more money and much better career prospects.

areyouinsane
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby areyouinsane » Sun Jul 17, 2011 1:55 am

True story: I am a summer at a V5 New York firm, and I just recently got up the courage to ask about our doc review dungeon. I asked in a naive way, and the litigation associates I was talking to all got kind of awkward and quiet as they described being taken on their first tour through the endless maze of cubicles on a floor that looks nothing like the rest of the firm. It was kind of shocking to hear the things from this thread echoed by actual attorneys.

The weirdest part isn't that it's grunt work or unglamorous - that's part of every industry. What's crazy is that the bifurcation between "upwardly mobile" and "stop asking questions and start marking documents as responsive or not" happens before anybody even has a chance to practice law. You're branded before you start, there's no exit to the big law equivalent of the 'mail room' - even though people of the same class year and same law schools are upstairs working for much more money and much better career prospects.


Forget the "same class and year" stuff- there are doc reviewers in their 40s and 50s making $25 an hour in these dungeons. Lawyers with experience you wouldn't believe: solos who once ran their own lucrative practices, former partners at small firms that split up, ex DA and public defenders, etc. The idea that everyone on doc review is a 2.0 GPA type from a Cooley/NYLS type TTT school is absurd, and I hope none of you have to learn this the hard way.

For example, a good buddy of mine from a project once was a partner in a small personal injury firm. Back when these cases were easier to settle, he made as much as 200 K a year. But the carriers started cracking down and making every case into a dogfight, revenue slowly dried up, and eventually they had to close up shop. He tried getting into insurance defense, but those jobs pay so poorly (45 K a year is not unusual, even for people with experience) that he had nowhere else to turn but the doc review dungeons.

Another gal I know was a NJ assistant DA who was let go in the budget cuts. She tried for months to get a job in private practice criminal defense, but sadly those jobs pay even worse than doc review (she was offered 25 K plus a 50/50 split of cases she brought in) by one DWI defense mill, and that was her only offer. Very few shitlawyers can make a living in crim. defense since 95%+ of all criminals just get the public defender.

I had to stop doing doc review largely because seeing (and working in) such an utter & complete waste of human capital gets depressing to the point of suicide after a few years. Understand that in document review you are treated and reminded every working minute that you're a worthless, expendable loser due no courtesy, respect, or treated with any professionalism whatsoever. The firms and agencies will lie about hours, lie about pay rates, lie about project length, and provide you with working conditions so abysmal you'll dread getting up in the morning.

Understand that many doc review jobs get cancelled before they even happen: Skadden was/is notorious for this. They used to staff thru an agency called Clutch Group, and the pay was often above market.

But 9 of 10 times the projects would never happen. I suppose Skadden wanted to have the coders lined up while settlement talks were ongoing so they could "call the bluff" of their adversary and start discovery rolling along quickly if need be.

Back in 2007 I was strung along for 2 weeks waiting on a gig to start: first it was Monday, then Wednesday, then Thursday, then the following Monday, then BAM: the case settled= no project period. So all that time wasted sending resumes, filling out conflict forms, and worst of all turning down other projects in the interim: all for naught. Do you know what it's like to have rent/student loans due and turn down 2 other projects while waiting for Skadden, then find out the rug was pulled out from under you? Then you have to start scouring craigslist all over again and calling all the other agencies begging them to put you on the fist gig that comes in.

Also after you do doc review awhile you start getting "conflicted out" of projects. I conflicted out of nearly every pharma project in 2008-9 because I worked on the huge Seroquel case. So you're stuck either lying to get on the gig, or turning it down and being broke. Some choice, huh?

Here's a terrible story re: that Seroquel case: there were over 300 temps working 90 hour weeks on that gig for the first 3 months of 2008. Once the production date passed, the partner walked into the rooms on a Friday afternoon and said "nothing to worry about, we're now going to start reviewing docs for the state court claims. See you all on Monday morning- go home and have a great weekend. WE're getting out early today so the new docs can be loaded."

So everyone left, and most left their stuff (books, coffee mugs, MP3 players, etc) at their workstations, since we were expressly told to be back at work Monday.

Two hours later the calls starting coming from the agency. "Sorry, but there's been a new development in the case and we're sorry to inform you you've been rolled off this project." They kept only 60 people out of 300.

I was one of those kept aboard. When I came in that Monday, almost all the workstations were getting packed up/dismantled by the tech guys, and the room was completely rearranged.

Here's the worst part: all of the personal items that the fired people had left behind were tossed into one huge pile in front of the downstairs security desk. It looked like those scenes in a prison movie where they "toss the cells." Just a huge heap of coats, sweatshirts, Ipods, coffee mugs, family photos, books/magazines, personal papers, cigarettes etc. It was liked the stuff was dumped from a dump truck: the pile was over 5 feet high. Most people had a good amount of stuff there since we'd been working 15+ hours a day for three months straight, including the weekends.

That day, most of my (former) co-workers trickled back in to claw thru this pile of shit and try to find the stuff they left behind. It was one of the saddest sites I've ever seen. As people plowed thru the stuff, everything was getting all stepped on and dirty. A lot of people wanted to come upstairs and say goodbye to friends etc, but security wouldn't let anyone past the front desk.

The reason the firms do it this way (i.e, lying to your face) is because they are paying the agencies a cut to do this dirty work for them. They're also afraid of people downloading viruses and such to the computers on the way out, and also of people begging them to be kept on the project, etc. It's a messy affair, so they just lie and let others do the dirty work for them.

These are the type of people you guys apparently aspire to work for. People who routinely treat others like expendable pieces of subhuman garbage, and furthermore do so on purpose. People who enjoy treating others like garbage. People who've let the thirst for money & ego override every aspect of life, to the point of essentially becoming a sociopath. People who are such chickenshit cowards that they can't even face people man to man, but have to hide behind lowlife staffing agencies to carry out their miserable directives.

I envy you guys because it's not too late for you. You can still back out and never have to experience this soul-crushing, overrated gutter of an industry. You can actually do something pleasant and productive with your lives, rather than squander your precious youth learning "Rule Against Perpetuities" puzzles and memorizing the "nuances" of UCC 2-207 and the other pointless makework that constitute the bulk of this rotten industry.

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IrwinM.Fletcher
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby IrwinM.Fletcher » Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:06 am

areyouinsane wrote:
True story: I am a summer at a V5 New York firm, and I just recently got up the courage to ask about our doc review dungeon. I asked in a naive way, and the litigation associates I was talking to all got kind of awkward and quiet as they described being taken on their first tour through the endless maze of cubicles on a floor that looks nothing like the rest of the firm. It was kind of shocking to hear the things from this thread echoed by actual attorneys.

The weirdest part isn't that it's grunt work or unglamorous - that's part of every industry. What's crazy is that the bifurcation between "upwardly mobile" and "stop asking questions and start marking documents as responsive or not" happens before anybody even has a chance to practice law. You're branded before you start, there's no exit to the big law equivalent of the 'mail room' - even though people of the same class year and same law schools are upstairs working for much more money and much better career prospects.


Forget the "same class and year" stuff- there are doc reviewers in their 40s and 50s making $25 an hour in these dungeons. Lawyers with experience you wouldn't believe: solos who once ran their own lucrative practices, former partners at small firms that split up, ex DA and public defenders, etc. The idea that everyone on doc review is a 2.0 GPA type from a Cooley/NYLS type TTT school is absurd, and I hope none of you have to learn this the hard way.

For example, a good buddy of mine from a project once was a partner in a small personal injury firm. Back when these cases were easier to settle, he made as much as 200 K a year. But the carriers started cracking down and making every case into a dogfight, revenue slowly dried up, and eventually they had to close up shop. He tried getting into insurance defense, but those jobs pay so poorly (45 K a year is not unusual, even for people with experience) that he had nowhere else to turn but the doc review dungeons.

Another gal I know was a NJ assistant DA who was let go in the budget cuts. She tried for months to get a job in private practice criminal defense, but sadly those jobs pay even worse than doc review (she was offered 25 K plus a 50/50 split of cases she brought in) by one DWI defense mill, and that was her only offer. Very few shitlawyers can make a living in crim. defense since 95%+ of all criminals just get the public defender.

I had to stop doing doc review largely because seeing (and working in) such an utter & complete waste of human capital gets depressing to the point of suicide after a few years. Understand that in document review you are treated and reminded every working minute that you're a worthless, expendable loser due no courtesy, respect, or treated with any professionalism whatsoever. The firms and agencies will lie about hours, lie about pay rates, lie about project length, and provide you with working conditions so abysmal you'll dread getting up in the morning.

Understand that many doc review jobs get cancelled before they even happen: Skadden was/is notorious for this. They used to staff thru an agency called Clutch Group, and the pay was often above market.

But 9 of 10 times the projects would never happen. I suppose Skadden wanted to have the coders lined up while settlement talks were ongoing so they could "call the bluff" of their adversary and start discovery rolling along quickly if need be.

Back in 2007 I was strung along for 2 weeks waiting on a gig to start: first it was Monday, then Wednesday, then Thursday, then the following Monday, then BAM: the case settled= no project period. So all that time wasted sending resumes, filling out conflict forms, and worst of all turning down other projects in the interim: all for naught. Do you know what it's like to have rent/student loans due and turn down 2 other projects while waiting for Skadden, then find out the rug was pulled out from under you? Then you have to start scouring craigslist all over again and calling all the other agencies begging them to put you on the fist gig that comes in.

Also after you do doc review awhile you start getting "conflicted out" of projects. I conflicted out of nearly every pharma project in 2008-9 because I worked on the huge Seroquel case. So you're stuck either lying to get on the gig, or turning it down and being broke. Some choice, huh?

Here's a terrible story re: that Seroquel case: there were over 300 temps working 90 hour weeks on that gig for the first 3 months of 2008. Once the production date passed, the partner walked into the rooms on a Friday afternoon and said "nothing to worry about, we're now going to start reviewing docs for the state court claims. See you all on Monday morning- go home and have a great weekend. WE're getting out early today so the new docs can be loaded."

So everyone left, and most left their stuff (books, coffee mugs, MP3 players, etc) at their workstations, since we were expressly told to be back at work Monday.

Two hours later the calls starting coming from the agency. "Sorry, but there's been a new development in the case and we're sorry to inform you you've been rolled off this project." They kept only 60 people out of 300.

I was one of those kept aboard. When I came in that Monday, almost all the workstations were getting packed up/dismantled by the tech guys, and the room was completely rearranged.

Here's the worst part: all of the personal items that the fired people had left behind were tossed into one huge pile in front of the downstairs security desk. It looked like those scenes in a prison movie where they "toss the cells." Just a huge heap of coats, sweatshirts, Ipods, coffee mugs, family photos, books/magazines, personal papers, cigarettes etc. It was liked the stuff was dumped from a dump truck: the pile was over 5 feet high. Most people had a good amount of stuff there since we'd been working 15+ hours a day for three months straight, including the weekends.

That day, most of my (former) co-workers trickled back in to claw thru this pile of shit and try to find the stuff they left behind. It was one of the saddest sites I've ever seen. As people plowed thru the stuff, everything was getting all stepped on and dirty. A lot of people wanted to come upstairs and say goodbye to friends etc, but security wouldn't let anyone past the front desk.

The reason the firms do it this way (i.e, lying to your face) is because they are paying the agencies a cut to do this dirty work for them. They're also afraid of people downloading viruses and such to the computers on the way out, and also of people begging them to be kept on the project, etc. It's a messy affair, so they just lie and let others do the dirty work for them.

These are the type of people you guys apparently aspire to work for. People who routinely treat others like expendable pieces of subhuman garbage, and furthermore do so on purpose. People who enjoy treating others like garbage. People who've let the thirst for money & ego override every aspect of life, to the point of essentially becoming a sociopath. People who are such chickenshit cowards that they can't even face people man to man, but have to hide behind lowlife staffing agencies to carry out their miserable directives.

I envy you guys because it's not too late for you. You can still back out and never have to experience this soul-crushing, overrated gutter of an industry. You can actually do something pleasant and productive with your lives, rather than squander your precious youth learning "Rule Against Perpetuities" puzzles and memorizing the "nuances" of UCC 2-207 and the other pointless makework that constitute the bulk of this rotten industry.


I swear to god Rolling Stone would at least think about publishing your rants as a series. They eat this kind of anti-establishment shit up. Please try it.

shoeshine
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby shoeshine » Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:06 am

You are no longer funny. You sound like you are describing Auschwitz. I am scared.

areyouinsane
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby areyouinsane » Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:23 am

You are no longer funny. You sound like you are describing Auschwitz. I am scared.


If you don't believe it, maybe this will convince you:

http://temporaryattorney.blogspot.com/2 ... loody.html

Read the comments to that post- there are lots of people who were mighty pissed at having their stuff dumped in a pile after being lied to on purpose.

Spend some time on the "Tom the Temp" website- there are horror stories on there that make mine seem downright uplifting by comparison.

areyouinsane
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby areyouinsane » Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:48 am

You're branded before you start, there's no exit to the big law equivalent of the 'mail room' - even though people of the same class year and same law schools are upstairs working for much more money and much better career prospects.[/quote


You are 100% correct. Once you start doing doc review, no one (not even small firms) will take you seriously as a job candidate. It's the kiss of death for your resume.

Worse yet, if you leave the law and start applying to other businesses/coprs for non-legal jobs, everyone asks "why were you never made permanent anywhere" and you're viewed as sort of a "bad penny" who can't hold down a job. Outsiders don't understand that law firms NEVER make doc reviewers into permanent associates, ever.

So in that sense your "career" is basically over before it ever begins. To be honest, I didn't really mind jumping from gig to gig for awhile, back when the $$$ was decent and you got to work with the same friends on different gigs all the time.

But after awhile you start to feel life passing you by, as you stare into a screen hour after endless hour reading 87 page "Tri-Lateral Broker-Dealer Sub Agreement Addendums" and using the mouse to redact (black out) the law firm's name from all 237 times it appears before clicking the "Produce Document" tab. Eating crappy Chinese take out food while the guy six inches to your right bangs his elbow into yours for the 400th time while digging a booger out of his nose and wiping it on a wrinkled copy of yesterday's NY Post.

Weird walking out to the street at 11 pm, the city boils loud, brilliant and alive. It almost overwhelms the senses after having stared into a computer monitor for the past 15 hours. Your eyes need time to adjust: for the first few minutes the headlights and car horns seem like hallucinations from an acid trip. Those were strange days, indeed.

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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby paulinaporizkova » Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:11 am

GOD SHUT THE FUCK UP YOU ARE THE BIGGEST PIECE OF SHIT POSTER I HAVE EVER SEEN ON THESE BOARDS

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thesealocust
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby thesealocust » Sun Jul 17, 2011 10:15 am

paulinaporizkova wrote:GOD SHUT THE FUCK UP YOU ARE THE BIGGEST PIECE OF SHIT POSTER I HAVE EVER SEEN ON THESE BOARDS


Friends don't let friends drink and TLS?

delusional
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby delusional » Sun Jul 17, 2011 10:34 am

paulinaporizkova wrote:GOD SHUT THE FUCK UP YOU ARE THE BIGGEST PIECE OF SHIT POSTER I HAVE EVER SEEN ON THESE BOARDS

Someone tries to inform and entertain in a manner that doesn't include popularity contests and e-peen comparisons? HORRORS!!!! GTFOOOOOOO!!!!

Renzo
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby Renzo » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:47 pm

thesealocust wrote:
paulinaporizkova wrote:GOD SHUT THE FUCK UP YOU ARE THE BIGGEST PIECE OF SHIT POSTER I HAVE EVER SEEN ON THESE BOARDS


Friends don't let friends drink and TLS?

Seriously.

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Verity
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby Verity » Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:24 pm

I had a bad dream last night. "Mr. Shitlaw" has officially replaced the Boogie Man.

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fanmingrui
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby fanmingrui » Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:30 pm

This thread is getting really depressing.

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thesealocust
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby thesealocust » Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:44 pm

fanmingrui wrote:This thread is getting really depressing.


Welcome to the legal profession! We're happy to have you.

auntjulia
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby auntjulia » Sun Jul 17, 2011 4:41 pm

paulinaporizkova wrote:GOD SHUT THE FUCK UP YOU ARE THE BIGGEST PIECE OF SHIT POSTER I HAVE EVER SEEN ON THESE BOARDS


Well I'd like to go on the record thanking areyouinsane. These posts have been great to read. I wish there were more posters with his depth of knowledge and storytelling ability.

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Heartford
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby Heartford » Sun Jul 17, 2011 8:25 pm

areyouinsane wrote: Weird walking out to the street at 11 pm, the city boils loud, brilliant and alive. It almost overwhelms the senses after having stared into a computer monitor for the past 15 hours. Your eyes need time to adjust: for the first few minutes the headlights and car horns seem like hallucinations from an acid trip. Those were strange days, indeed.


This last paragraph is trying a little too hard for the Rolling Stone aesthetic, and never really getting there, I think. Strange days, indeed? Kind of lame. Otherwise, I'm enjoying your posts. :D

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HarveyBirdman
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Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby HarveyBirdman » Sun Jul 17, 2011 9:37 pm

areyouinsane, why did you go to school and subsequently try to work in NYC, the most overcrowded city in terms of lawyer surplus? Perhaps your life would've turned out differently had you been willing to live and work somewhere else in the country. Nebraska and Wisconsin were recently cited as the only states that didn't have a lawyer surplus...I'm sure I'm not the only 0L who started looking into University of Nebraska Lincoln.

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HarveyBirdman
Posts: 96
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:25 pm

Re: Where do contract / temp attorneys come from?

Postby HarveyBirdman » Sun Jul 17, 2011 9:39 pm

paulinaporizkova wrote:GOD SHUT THE FUCK UP YOU ARE THE BIGGEST PIECE OF SHIT POSTER I HAVE EVER SEEN ON THESE BOARDS


And I just wanted to say after scanning through this thread, I about died when I saw this post. I think it was a combo of 11 pages of ridiculous stories, the all caps, and the poster's funny rainbow unicorn avatar. In any event, it made me laugh more than the actual stories.




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