How to break into WLRK?

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Renzo
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Renzo » Sat May 21, 2011 11:22 pm

Nom Sawyer wrote:Either way though I would never want to work there. 3000 hours sounds absolutely horrible... Haven't they heard of the backwards bending utility curve for salary?


Yes. It assumes that workers choose their hours. It also assumes that leisure is a normal good. But, in biglaw, you have a few people for whom leisure is an inferior good, and they are responsible for setting the hours of all employees.

Anonymous User
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 22, 2011 2:14 am

that is a straight up LIE because I was talking to a partner from Williams & Connolly (Stanford alum) a couple of months ago and she said that even when she was at Stanford (10 years ago) everyone wanted WLRK and she said not much has changed since.


I'm the anon above.

No, it's not a lie, and sorry to burst your bubble but that's definitely not the case at Stanford anymore. I'm a 2L at Stanford, on law review, and probably somewhere around top 10% (although who really knows). I didn't bid for WLRK and I certainly wasn't alone among top students or those on law review. I would be pretty shocked if the majority of SLR 2Ls even so much as bid on WLRK. Even among those SLS students who are looking to go to NYC (as the poster above described, this is a minority of the class), WLRK isn't uniformly those students' top choice. First, people here really do care a lot about quality of life--it's a significant reason why a lot of us came to Stanford specifically. And, second, WLRK is really even only arguably the "best" for transactional work, and I'd guess that a minority of those looking to go to firms here want to do transactional. But most of all, my sense is that a majority of the class didn't bid on more than a handful of NYC firms (and if you're going to go for 1, it's typically not going to be WLRK).

My sense of the "desired" firms here at Stanford is that boutiques and specialty firms are popular--Jenner DC, Irell, Keker, Munger, etc (not tops in Vault, but excellent at what they do). Mofo, which has a big campus presence, definitely has more SAs than you'd expect, although I don't think it's one of the most competitive firms.

I'd be surprised if this is different at Yale, but hey, maybe it is--most students at Stanford got into Harvard or Yale or both (just as most students at Yale got into Stanford and Harvard, and many students at Harvard got into Stanford and Yale), and therefore it is a pretty self-selected group of students who end up here. Sure, people, for the most part, keep jumping through the "prestige" hoops even after getting into Stanford, but people really don't care much about Vault rankings or whatnot here--the gold stars people strive for at Stanford are things like clerkships, the Supreme Court Clinic (although trust me, the Clinic's definitely not for everybody), and to a lesser extent Law Review.

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quakeroats
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby quakeroats » Sun May 22, 2011 2:27 am

Anonymous User wrote:
that is a straight up LIE because I was talking to a partner from Williams & Connolly (Stanford alum) a couple of months ago and she said that even when she was at Stanford (10 years ago) everyone wanted WLRK and she said not much has changed since.


I'm the anon above.

No, it's not a lie, and sorry to burst your bubble but that's definitely not the case at Stanford anymore. I'm a 2L at Stanford, on law review, and probably somewhere around top 10% (although who really knows). I didn't bid for WLRK and I certainly wasn't alone among top students or those on law review. I would be pretty shocked if the majority of SLR 2Ls even so much as bid on WLRK. Even among those SLS students who are looking to go to NYC (as the poster above described, this is a minority of the class), WLRK isn't uniformly those students' top choice. First, people here really do care a lot about quality of life--it's a significant reason why a lot of us came to Stanford specifically. And, second, WLRK is really even only arguably the "best" for transactional work, and I'd guess that a minority of those looking to go to firms here want to do transactional. But most of all, my sense is that a majority of the class didn't bid on more than a handful of NYC firms (and if you're going to go for 1, it's typically not going to be WLRK).

My sense of the "desired" firms here at Stanford is that boutiques and specialty firms are popular--Jenner DC, Irell, Keker, Munger, etc (not tops in Vault, but excellent at what they do). Mofo, which has a big campus presence, definitely has more SAs than you'd expect, although I don't think it's one of the most competitive firms.

I'd be surprised if this is different at Yale, but hey, maybe it is--most students at Stanford got into Harvard or Yale or both (just as most students at Yale got into Stanford and Harvard, and many students at Harvard got into Stanford and Yale), and therefore it is a pretty self-selected group of students who end up here. Sure, people, for the most part, keep jumping through the "prestige" hoops even after getting into Stanford, but people really don't care much about Vault rankings or whatnot here--the gold stars people strive for at Stanford are things like clerkships, the Supreme Court Clinic (although trust me, the Clinic's definitely not for everybody), and to a lesser extent Law Review.


I have no doubt.

flcath
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby flcath » Sun May 22, 2011 3:16 am

Anonymous User wrote:
that is a straight up LIE because I was talking to a partner from Williams & Connolly (Stanford alum) a couple of months ago and she said that even when she was at Stanford (10 years ago) everyone wanted WLRK and she said not much has changed since.


I'm the anon above.

No, it's not a lie, and sorry to burst your bubble but that's definitely not the case at Stanford anymore. I'm a 2L at Stanford, on law review, and probably somewhere around top 10% (although who really knows). I didn't bid for WLRK and I certainly wasn't alone among top students or those on law review. I would be pretty shocked if the majority of SLR 2Ls even so much as bid on WLRK. Even among those SLS students who are looking to go to NYC (as the poster above described, this is a minority of the class), WLRK isn't uniformly those students' top choice. First, people here really do care a lot about quality of life--it's a significant reason why a lot of us came to Stanford specifically. And, second, WLRK is really even only arguably the "best" for transactional work, and I'd guess that a minority of those looking to go to firms here want to do transactional. But most of all, my sense is that a majority of the class didn't bid on more than a handful of NYC firms (and if you're going to go for 1, it's typically not going to be WLRK).

My sense of the "desired" firms here at Stanford is that boutiques and specialty firms are popular--Jenner DC, Irell, Keker, Munger, etc (not tops in Vault, but excellent at what they do). Mofo, which has a big campus presence, definitely has more SAs than you'd expect, although I don't think it's one of the most competitive firms.

I'd be surprised if this is different at Yale, but hey, maybe it is--most students at Stanford got into Harvard or Yale or both (just as most students at Yale got into Stanford and Harvard, and many students at Harvard got into Stanford and Yale), and therefore it is a pretty self-selected group of students who end up here. Sure, people, for the most part, keep jumping through the "prestige" hoops even after getting into Stanford, but people really don't care much about Vault rankings or whatnot here--the gold stars people strive for at Stanford are things like clerkships, the Supreme Court Clinic (although trust me, the Clinic's definitely not for everybody), and to a lesser extent Law Review.

Interesting perspective on life at Stanford. This is always how I've kinda suspected it would be there.

<2 decades before S is the hands-down best university on earth.

Anonymous User
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 22, 2011 3:46 am

Anonymous User wrote:Can anyone speak about how difficult it is to lateral from WLRK as a 1st- or 2nd-year associate to a firm in SF/LA if that is where you want to permanently reside?


I know one person who did it. http://www.irell.com/professionals-235.html

She relocated to LA because of her husband, and she pretty much had her choice of LA firms in the process. Don't know if things always go this swimmingly for WLRK associates, but I have to imagine they can always lateral somewhere into LA/SF Biglaw if that's what they want. (Still, billing 3000 hours for the first couple of years...ugh, I'll pass).

Anonymous User
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 22, 2011 6:35 am

Anonymous User wrote:
that is a straight up LIE because I was talking to a partner from Williams & Connolly (Stanford alum) a couple of months ago and she said that even when she was at Stanford (10 years ago) everyone wanted WLRK and she said not much has changed since.


I'm the anon above.

No, it's not a lie, and sorry to burst your bubble but that's definitely not the case at Stanford anymore. I'm a 2L at Stanford, on law review, and probably somewhere around top 10% (although who really knows). I didn't bid for WLRK and I certainly wasn't alone among top students or those on law review. I would be pretty shocked if the majority of SLR 2Ls even so much as bid on WLRK. Even among those SLS students who are looking to go to NYC (as the poster above described, this is a minority of the class), WLRK isn't uniformly those students' top choice. First, people here really do care a lot about quality of life--it's a significant reason why a lot of us came to Stanford specifically. And, second, WLRK is really even only arguably the "best" for transactional work, and I'd guess that a minority of those looking to go to firms here want to do transactional. But most of all, my sense is that a majority of the class didn't bid on more than a handful of NYC firms (and if you're going to go for 1, it's typically not going to be WLRK).

My sense of the "desired" firms here at Stanford is that boutiques and specialty firms are popular--Jenner DC, Irell, Keker, Munger, etc (not tops in Vault, but excellent at what they do). Mofo, which has a big campus presence, definitely has more SAs than you'd expect, although I don't think it's one of the most competitive firms.

I'd be surprised if this is different at Yale, but hey, maybe it is--most students at Stanford got into Harvard or Yale or both (just as most students at Yale got into Stanford and Harvard, and many students at Harvard got into Stanford and Yale), and therefore it is a pretty self-selected group of students who end up here. Sure, people, for the most part, keep jumping through the "prestige" hoops even after getting into Stanford, but people really don't care much about Vault rankings or whatnot here--the gold stars people strive for at Stanford are things like clerkships, the Supreme Court Clinic (although trust me, the Clinic's definitely not for everybody), and to a lesser extent Law Review.


Somewhat off-topic, but do you know how difficult it is for an HLS student around top 10% to break into the SF transactional big law market at OCI? No ties, but a strong desire to permanently reside there that can be spun into a convincing narrative. Is SF the most coveted area for SLS kids to go in Cali or is it evenly split b/w LA and SF? What are the best, in your view, transactional firms in SF and LA?

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Nom Sawyer
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Nom Sawyer » Sun May 22, 2011 7:40 am

Renzo wrote:
Nom Sawyer wrote:Either way though I would never want to work there. 3000 hours sounds absolutely horrible... Haven't they heard of the backwards bending utility curve for salary?


Yes. It assumes that workers choose their hours. It also assumes that leisure is a normal good. But, in biglaw, you have a few people for whom leisure is an inferior good, and they are responsible for setting the hours of all employees.


Lol it was just a joke, but a very good reply renzo hahaha

liLtuneChi
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby liLtuneChi » Sun May 22, 2011 9:25 am

Anonymous User wrote:
that is a straight up LIE because I was talking to a partner from Williams & Connolly (Stanford alum) a couple of months ago and she said that even when she was at Stanford (10 years ago) everyone wanted WLRK and she said not much has changed since.


I'm the anon above.

No, it's not a lie, and sorry to burst your bubble but that's definitely not the case at Stanford anymore. I'm a 2L at Stanford, on law review, and probably somewhere around top 10% (although who really knows). I didn't bid for WLRK and I certainly wasn't alone among top students or those on law review. I would be pretty shocked if the majority of SLR 2Ls even so much as bid on WLRK. Even among those SLS students who are looking to go to NYC (as the poster above described, this is a minority of the class), WLRK isn't uniformly those students' top choice. First, people here really do care a lot about quality of life--it's a significant reason why a lot of us came to Stanford specifically. And, second, WLRK is really even only arguably the "best" for transactional work, and I'd guess that a minority of those looking to go to firms here want to do transactional. But most of all, my sense is that a majority of the class didn't bid on more than a handful of NYC firms (and if you're going to go for 1, it's typically not going to be WLRK).

My sense of the "desired" firms here at Stanford is that boutiques and specialty firms are popular--Jenner DC, Irell, Keker, Munger, etc (not tops in Vault, but excellent at what they do). Mofo, which has a big campus presence, definitely has more SAs than you'd expect, although I don't think it's one of the most competitive firms.

I'd be surprised if this is different at Yale, but hey, maybe it is--most students at Stanford got into Harvard or Yale or both (just as most students at Yale got into Stanford and Harvard, and many students at Harvard got into Stanford and Yale), and therefore it is a pretty self-selected group of students who end up here. Sure, people, for the most part, keep jumping through the "prestige" hoops even after getting into Stanford, but people really don't care much about Vault rankings or whatnot here--the gold stars people strive for at Stanford are things like clerkships, the Supreme Court Clinic (although trust me, the Clinic's definitely not for everybody), and to a lesser extent Law Review.


now your making up ducktales

the 75th percentile LSAT at Stanford is 173

thats the median at both Harvard and Yale

most students at Stanford did NOT get into those schools....stop making things up....sure there were some but definitely not MOST

most Harvard students didn't get into Yale either

only school where we know most of the people there could get into any school in the country is Yale.....PERIOD

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thecilent
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby thecilent » Sun May 22, 2011 1:58 pm

liLtuneChi wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
that is a straight up LIE because I was talking to a partner from Williams & Connolly (Stanford alum) a couple of months ago and she said that even when she was at Stanford (10 years ago) everyone wanted WLRK and she said not much has changed since.


I'm the anon above.

No, it's not a lie, and sorry to burst your bubble but that's definitely not the case at Stanford anymore. I'm a 2L at Stanford, on law review, and probably somewhere around top 10% (although who really knows). I didn't bid for WLRK and I certainly wasn't alone among top students or those on law review. I would be pretty shocked if the majority of SLR 2Ls even so much as bid on WLRK. Even among those SLS students who are looking to go to NYC (as the poster above described, this is a minority of the class), WLRK isn't uniformly those students' top choice. First, people here really do care a lot about quality of life--it's a significant reason why a lot of us came to Stanford specifically. And, second, WLRK is really even only arguably the "best" for transactional work, and I'd guess that a minority of those looking to go to firms here want to do transactional. But most of all, my sense is that a majority of the class didn't bid on more than a handful of NYC firms (and if you're going to go for 1, it's typically not going to be WLRK).

My sense of the "desired" firms here at Stanford is that boutiques and specialty firms are popular--Jenner DC, Irell, Keker, Munger, etc (not tops in Vault, but excellent at what they do). Mofo, which has a big campus presence, definitely has more SAs than you'd expect, although I don't think it's one of the most competitive firms.

I'd be surprised if this is different at Yale, but hey, maybe it is--most students at Stanford got into Harvard or Yale or both (just as most students at Yale got into Stanford and Harvard, and many students at Harvard got into Stanford and Yale), and therefore it is a pretty self-selected group of students who end up here. Sure, people, for the most part, keep jumping through the "prestige" hoops even after getting into Stanford, but people really don't care much about Vault rankings or whatnot here--the gold stars people strive for at Stanford are things like clerkships, the Supreme Court Clinic (although trust me, the Clinic's definitely not for everybody), and to a lesser extent Law Review.


now your making up ducktales

the 75th percentile LSAT at Stanford is 173

thats the median at both Harvard and Yale

most students at Stanford did NOT get into those schools....stop making things up....sure there were some but definitely not MOST

most Harvard students didn't get into Yale either

only school where we know most of the people there could get into any school in the country is Yale.....PERIOD

For real. liltunechi great new poster.

Anonymous User
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 22, 2011 2:13 pm

now your making up ducktales

the 75th percentile LSAT at Stanford is 173

thats the median at both Harvard and Yale

most students at Stanford did NOT get into those schools....stop making things up....sure there were some but definitely not MOST


Not true. Harvard's so much bigger than Stanford, and admissions are driven by so much more than pure numbers for HYS (especially for YS), that this isn't necessarily the case.

Renzo
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Renzo » Sun May 22, 2011 2:17 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
now your making up ducktales

the 75th percentile LSAT at Stanford is 173

thats the median at both Harvard and Yale

most students at Stanford did NOT get into those schools....stop making things up....sure there were some but definitely not MOST


Not true. Harvard's so much bigger than Stanford, and admissions are driven by so much more than pure numbers for HYS (especially for YS), that this isn't necessarily the case.


Lol at anonymous STTTandford TTTrolls.

Allure
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Allure » Sun May 22, 2011 8:59 pm

I'm not the anonymous person who wrote that, but I do agree with him. Just like you, I thought it'd be boring as hell, but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise. Even if it sounds dull now, when you take Corporations those cases (including the recent developments, like Airgas) involve some of the most interesting developing legal issues around. Keep an open mind until you take the course - I can almost guarantee you it'll be the most interesting topic all semester.


This smells like bullshit. WLRK specializes in representing targets in M&A deals, not parents. Joe Flom pioneered the hostile takeover. WLRK pioneered the defenses.

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PKSebben
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby PKSebben » Sun May 22, 2011 9:03 pm

Allure wrote:
I'm not the anonymous person who wrote that, but I do agree with him. Just like you, I thought it'd be boring as hell, but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise. Even if it sounds dull now, when you take Corporations those cases (including the recent developments, like Airgas) involve some of the most interesting developing legal issues around. Keep an open mind until you take the course - I can almost guarantee you it'll be the most interesting topic all semester.


This smells like bullshit. WLRK specializes in representing targets in M&A deals, not parents. Joe Flom pioneered the hostile takeover. WLRK pioneered the defenses.


Hello there, alt. I will allow you to stay so long as you play nice. OK? Also: Don't you have a bar to study for or something? Also, Also: you are correct w/r/t Flom & WLRK.

Allure
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Allure » Sun May 22, 2011 9:04 pm

Oh don't get me wrong - this is litigation, too. Wachtell structures their takeover defense so that it's defensible in court, but it also represents them in court to argue these defenses. M&A takeover defenses are transactionally implemented, but they're driven by and in response to the underlying Delaware (i.e., corporate) case law that continues to develop. For an example of some of the issues/considerations in these cases, http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/02/16/who-won-in-the-airgas-poison-pill-case/ might be an interesting read. In any event, glad to hear you're staying open to it.


I don't like the way this smells either. The airgas drama was interesting because it was such a longshot for Wachtell. Saying they "structure their deals" to be defensible in litigation says nothing. Every firm tries to get the most for their client without overstepping the bounds of the law. The problem is that, despite so much precedent in DE law, there's still not a lot of guidance on what works and what doesn't. And a lot of that isn't litigated because the deals close anyways or the parties settle or it doesn't go to trial for some such reason or another.

An example of this is the Bear Sterns fire sale, where WLRK very clearly overstepped the bounds of the law in structuring the deal. DE courts let it go (in a really weird way) because of the economic crisis, but the deal definitely raised eyebrows. And WLRK made mistakes there too.

Allure
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Allure » Sun May 22, 2011 9:06 pm

Sure, you need good grades, but I'd many DC firms and places like Irell are more grade-selective.


OK this is the second time I've read the most patently ridiculous stuff here. First was that other poster suggesting that Covington is more "grade selective." Neither Covington nor Irell are more grade-selective than WLRK. Sorry to burst bubbles if you're working there. They're great firms though, so you should by no means be insecure if someone with top 30% grades can get an offer at Irell but can't WLRK.

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FlightoftheEarls
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby FlightoftheEarls » Sun May 22, 2011 9:09 pm

Allure wrote:
I'm not the anonymous person who wrote that, but I do agree with him. Just like you, I thought it'd be boring as hell, but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise. Even if it sounds dull now, when you take Corporations those cases (including the recent developments, like Airgas) involve some of the most interesting developing legal issues around. Keep an open mind until you take the course - I can almost guarantee you it'll be the most interesting topic all semester.


This smells like bullshit. WLRK specializes in representing targets in M&A deals, not parents. Joe Flom pioneered the hostile takeover. WLRK pioneered the defenses.

:?:

You alright there, bro?

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PKSebben
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby PKSebben » Sun May 22, 2011 9:11 pm

FlightoftheEarls wrote:
Allure wrote:
I'm not the anonymous person who wrote that, but I do agree with him. Just like you, I thought it'd be boring as hell, but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise. Even if it sounds dull now, when you take Corporations those cases (including the recent developments, like Airgas) involve some of the most interesting developing legal issues around. Keep an open mind until you take the course - I can almost guarantee you it'll be the most interesting topic all semester.


This smells like bullshit. WLRK specializes in representing targets in M&A deals, not parents. Joe Flom pioneered the hostile takeover. WLRK pioneered the defenses.

:?:

You alright there, bro?


um, that's the correct nomenclature.

Allure
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Allure » Sun May 22, 2011 9:14 pm

I think the advice here regarding pursuing other firms based on their talents in other areas is sound (i.e., if you want to be a litigator and have an offer at W&C and WLRK, take W&C).

But the notion that corporate associates might be better served at another NYC V5/V10 than WLRK depending on their specific specialization is, in my opinion, outright absurd. Unless you, say, wanted to do capital markets work at a place like Davis Polk or S&C, WLRK is easily the best place to be if you want to be a corporate lawyer. The sophistication of the work and the level of responsibility at all levels is unmatched. People work long hours, but for them that's not a super huge issue when they're doing work they want to do. I have no issue billing 3,000 hours a year if I'm not doing doc review for all 3,000 hours.

I do have qualms about the quality control for work product at an associates 3,000th hour. But overall, people work the hours that they work at Wachtell because they are given substantial responsibility on the deals they work on and the amount of training they receive is unsurpassed. If you want to turn down WLRK for some other NY corporate shop because of hours, that's fine. But if you want to turn WLRK down because you feel like that other firm is better in some subset of transactional law than WLRK, I think that's misguided.

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FlightoftheEarls
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby FlightoftheEarls » Sun May 22, 2011 9:14 pm

PKSebben wrote:
FlightoftheEarls wrote:
Allure wrote:
I'm not the anonymous person who wrote that, but I do agree with him. Just like you, I thought it'd be boring as hell, but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise. Even if it sounds dull now, when you take Corporations those cases (including the recent developments, like Airgas) involve some of the most interesting developing legal issues around. Keep an open mind until you take the course - I can almost guarantee you it'll be the most interesting topic all semester.


This smells like bullshit. WLRK specializes in representing targets in M&A deals, not parents. Joe Flom pioneered the hostile takeover. WLRK pioneered the defenses.

:?:

You alright there, bro?


um, that's the correct nomenclature.

What is? WLRK represents targets, not the acquiring company. That's exactly what I said.

Allure
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Allure » Sun May 22, 2011 9:15 pm

They also represent parents, actually. It's just that they're usually on the target-side.

Allure
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Allure » Sun May 22, 2011 9:17 pm

FlightoftheEarls wrote:
Allure wrote:
I'm not the anonymous person who wrote that, but I do agree with him. Just like you, I thought it'd be boring as hell, but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise. Even if it sounds dull now, when you take Corporations those cases (including the recent developments, like Airgas) involve some of the most interesting developing legal issues around. Keep an open mind until you take the course - I can almost guarantee you it'll be the most interesting topic all semester.


This smells like bullshit. WLRK specializes in representing targets in M&A deals, not parents. Joe Flom pioneered the hostile takeover. WLRK pioneered the defenses.

:?:

You alright there, bro?


My bad there, bro.

Another point about your post. Just because it's interesting to you, doesn't mean it will be interesting to others, even after a positively lovely and indulgent course in corporations or business associations or whatever. For many people, transactional work is boring. And there's nothing wrong if they think that. I personally find it interesting but can't stand the notion of being a deal lawyer, so I'm going to be a litigator instead. It is what it is.

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FlightoftheEarls
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby FlightoftheEarls » Sun May 22, 2011 9:18 pm

Allure wrote:They also represent parents, actually. It's just that they're usually on the target-side.

Ok. So how was what I wrote incorrect, or did you just misread it when I wrote that WLRK specializes in representing Targets in takeovers? Let me quote again for you:
FlightoftheEarls wrote:. . . but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise.

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PKSebben
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby PKSebben » Sun May 22, 2011 9:20 pm

FlightoftheEarls wrote:What is? WLRK represents targets, not the acquiring company. That's exactly what I said.


Sounded like you were beefing with his terms -- I didn't see your bolded quote, my bad. You're both saying the same thing.

Allure
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby Allure » Sun May 22, 2011 9:22 pm

FlightoftheEarls wrote:
Allure wrote:They also represent parents, actually. It's just that they're usually on the target-side.

Ok. So how was what I wrote incorrect, or did you just misread it when I wrote that WLRK specializes in representing Targets in takeovers? Let me quote again for you:
FlightoftheEarls wrote:. . . but Wachtell specializes in (or rather, pioneered in the 1980s through Marty Lipton) a very specific type of target-side M&A takeover expertise.


See above where I said "my bad." That was right above this post.

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FlightoftheEarls
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Re: How to break into WLRK?

Postby FlightoftheEarls » Sun May 22, 2011 9:22 pm

Allure wrote:Another point about your post. Just because it's interesting to you, doesn't mean it will be interesting to others, even after a positively lovely and indulgent course in corporations or business associations or whatever. For many people, transactional work is boring. And there's nothing wrong if they think that. I personally find it interesting but can't stand the notion of being a deal lawyer, so I'm going to be a litigator instead. It is what it is.

1.) No shit.

2.) Are you just arguing to argue? I couldn't care less if you find corporations to be boring and want to litigate. I was telling Veyron to keep an open mind since many people unexpectedly do find it interesting. Thanks for pointing out that some people like some things, and other people like other things.




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