Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

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bruinwang
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby bruinwang » Sun May 15, 2011 7:48 pm

kapachino wrote:
ResolutePear wrote:

Well, it's true. That's why there's PA's.

Doctors gravitate towards specialties with higher pay and prestige.

Why be a PCP when you can be an oncologist and make twice as much? That's the problem.


Specialties are currently oversaturated, and it's only a matter of time before the bubble bursts. PCP is the safe route, but not many med students want it.


From what I've heard anecdotally, specialists (namely surgeons) also have shorter careers on average due to the inherent physical and mental burdens of the job. For instance, surgery demands a high level of manual dexterity that people naturally lose over time, as well as intense concentration during the course of an operation that could take 10+ hours. These individuals would eventually have to shift into other, less hands-on roles such as teaching, admin/management, etc. On the other hand, I could see lawyers going a lot longer in their primary field.

Anonymous User
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 15, 2011 8:33 pm

.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Sun May 15, 2011 10:04 pm

DoubleChecks wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
DoubleChecks wrote:
Renzo wrote:No one who can actually get into medical school would go to law school.


lies, i would probably still choose law school over medical school lol -- it is a profession that is arguably more stressful with a much more hellish grad school period


Definitely not true. I would hate to be MD. I took all the pre med classes and had a perfect 4.0 in then, a 3.95 overall. Not sure I would have gotten into every med school, but certainly a med school. I'm now a student at a T5 law school.

I hate that doctors get some much respect. I think most MD are uncreative. I have way more respect for Ph.D.s than MDs.

I think going to a top 10 law school is better than any med school.

In sum, for the top students I think law is better.

For the medium student, med is safer and better.


what part is definitely not true? are you saying that medical school being more hellish than law school is definitely not true? or that the profession is arguably more stressful than law?

either way, you've just pretty much made a greater blanket statement that has 0 evidence to back it up. sry, i dont think you'd be a great lawyer either -- unless you didnt mean to include yourself in the "top students" bracket, in which case i guess we can agree on something.

and seriously...are you implying the profession of law is NOT uncreative? lol


My "definitely not true" statement above was directed towards Renzo's statement. I was trying to agree with you, Doublechecks.

As someone who's background was a better fit for med school than law school, I made the choice to go law school and would make it again, and I am therefore the example of one needed to refute Renzo's statement.

And, along with other posters in this board, I do include MD/PhDs in the group of PhDs who I think deserve more respect. The vast majority of medical research is done by PhDs.

Doctors are just technicians, in my opinion. Maybe most lawyers are too, but at least you are suppose to make creative and convincing arguments when you write. In my opinion, your job as a doctor is to be inherently uncreative--to apply the knowledge generated by researchers.

Maybe being a lawyer will suck, and I'll regret my life choices down the road. So be it. But I'm glad to be in law school know. And I'd make the choice again.

And the only thing better about harvard med over yale law is that it impresses people more in bars, IMO.

The Insider
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby The Insider » Sun May 15, 2011 10:43 pm

My "definitely not true" statement above was directed towards Renzo's statement. I was trying to agree with you, Doublechecks.

As someone who's background was a better fit for med school than law school, I made the choice to go law school and would make it again, and I am therefore the example of one needed to refute Renzo's statement.

And, along with other posters in this board, I do include MD/PhDs in the group of PhDs who I think deserve more respect. The vast majority of medical research is done by PhDs.

Doctors are just technicians, in my opinion. Maybe most lawyers are too, but at least you are suppose to make creative and convincing arguments when you write. In my opinion, your job as a doctor is to be inherently uncreative--to apply the knowledge generated by researchers.

Maybe being a lawyer will suck, and I'll regret my life choices down the road. So be it. But I'm glad to be in law school know. And I'd make the choice again.

And the only thing better about harvard med over yale law is that it impresses people more in bars, IMO.


My gosh, this post is filled with sheer stupidity. Doctors have to know how anatomy works, basic physics, bodily functions and diseases, diagnosis, as well as have excellent writing skills. Lawyers only need writing skills. You make it seem as if lawyers are above doctors; sure, given the fact that a JD is just another humanities degree and when you work in Biglaw, all you do is pincite and push papers every day, sure beats anything else out there. Even partners get terminated if they don't contribute to the firm's overall profitability.

In the end, lawyers take something away from someone, whether it be money, property, or freedom. Doctors have everything to give. When there is a successful treatment, no one is mad a doctor, and he/she is satisfied with the outcome.

Science and the human body are awesome (and don't act like they aren't), whereas laws are just that; laws, man-made notions that are different in every country, be that in Canada or Saudi Arabia. The human body and science is a universal construct, thereby making it much more interesting than law in general.

There is an extremely high case of depression, job dissatisfaction, alcoholism, and general misery among lawyers. How many lawyers love their work after 20 years? Damn few. Sure Docs are unhappy with the bureaucracy of modern health care, but most still find meaning in their work. Hell, most lawyers can't even stand Biglaw after 2 years, realizing such a Faustian Deal was worse than expected.

And to clarify: a PhD is NOT a professional degree, incapable of providing a practice or service, and is not a license. MD blows it out of the water bar-none.

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vamedic03
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby vamedic03 » Sun May 15, 2011 11:01 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
My "definitely not true" statement above was directed towards Renzo's statement. I was trying to agree with you, Doublechecks.

As someone who's background was a better fit for med school than law school, I made the choice to go law school and would make it again, and I am therefore the example of one needed to refute Renzo's statement.

And, along with other posters in this board, I do include MD/PhDs in the group of PhDs who I think deserve more respect. The vast majority of medical research is done by PhDs.

Doctors are just technicians, in my opinion. Maybe most lawyers are too, but at least you are suppose to make creative and convincing arguments when you write. In my opinion, your job as a doctor is to be inherently uncreative--to apply the knowledge generated by researchers.

Maybe being a lawyer will suck, and I'll regret my life choices down the road. So be it. But I'm glad to be in law school know. And I'd make the choice again.

And the only thing better about harvard med over yale law is that it impresses people more in bars, IMO.


My gosh, this post is filled with sheer stupidity. Doctors have to know how anatomy works, basic physics, bodily functions and diseases, diagnosis, as well as have excellent writing skills. Lawyers only need writing skills. You make it seem as if lawyers are above doctors; sure, given the fact that a JD is just another humanities degree and when you work in Biglaw, all you do is pincite and push papers every day, sure beats anything else out there. Even partners get terminated if they don't contribute to the firm's overall profitability.

In the end, lawyers take something away from someone, whether it be money, property, or freedom. Doctors have everything to give. When there is a successful treatment, no one is mad a doctor, and he/she is satisfied with the outcome.

Science and the human body are awesome (and don't act like they aren't), whereas laws are just that; laws, man-made notions that are different in every country, be that in Canada or Saudi Arabia. The human body and science is a universal construct, thereby making it much more interesting than law in general.

There is an extremely high case of depression, job dissatisfaction, alcoholism, and general misery among lawyers. How many lawyers love their work after 20 years? Damn few. Sure Docs are unhappy with the bureaucracy of modern health care, but most still find meaning in their work. Hell, most lawyers can't even stand Biglaw after 2 years, realizing such a Faustian Deal was worse than expected.

And to clarify: a PhD is NOT a professional degree, incapable of providing a practice or service, and is not a license. MD blows it out of the water bar-none.


(1) If you hate lawyers then leave this forum.

(2) Why anonymous?

(3) You have a lot of attitude for anonymous posting.

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tinman
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby tinman » Mon May 16, 2011 3:41 am

Anonymous User wrote:
My "definitely not true" statement above was directed towards Renzo's statement. I was trying to agree with you, Doublechecks.

As someone who's background was a better fit for med school than law school, I made the choice to go law school and would make it again, and I am therefore the example of one needed to refute Renzo's statement.

And, along with other posters in this board, I do include MD/PhDs in the group of PhDs who I think deserve more respect. The vast majority of medical research is done by PhDs.

Doctors are just technicians, in my opinion. Maybe most lawyers are too, but at least you are suppose to make creative and convincing arguments when you write. In my opinion, your job as a doctor is to be inherently uncreative--to apply the knowledge generated by researchers.

Maybe being a lawyer will suck, and I'll regret my life choices down the road. So be it. But I'm glad to be in law school know. And I'd make the choice again.

And the only thing better about harvard med over yale law is that it impresses people more in bars, IMO.


My gosh, this post is filled with sheer stupidity. Doctors have to know how anatomy works, basic physics, bodily functions and diseases, diagnosis, as well as have excellent writing skills. Lawyers only need writing skills. You make it seem as if lawyers are above doctors; sure, given the fact that a JD is just another humanities degree and when you work in Biglaw, all you do is pincite and push papers every day, sure beats anything else out there. Even partners get terminated if they don't contribute to the firm's overall profitability.

In the end, lawyers take something away from someone, whether it be money, property, or freedom. Doctors have everything to give. When there is a successful treatment, no one is mad a doctor, and he/she is satisfied with the outcome.

Science and the human body are awesome (and don't act like they aren't), whereas laws are just that; laws, man-made notions that are different in every country, be that in Canada or Saudi Arabia. The human body and science is a universal construct, thereby making it much more interesting than law in general.

There is an extremely high case of depression, job dissatisfaction, alcoholism, and general misery among lawyers. How many lawyers love their work after 20 years? Damn few. Sure Docs are unhappy with the bureaucracy of modern health care, but most still find meaning in their work. Hell, most lawyers can't even stand Biglaw after 2 years, realizing such a Faustian Deal was worse than expected.

And to clarify: a PhD is NOT a professional degree, incapable of providing a practice or service, and is not a license. MD blows it out of the water bar-none.


Wow, with such love for medicine and such disdain for lawyers I hope you stumbled her while looking for top-med-schools.com. I think lawyers--well, law--contributes a great deal to society. I think the rule of law is what makes places like America great. I'm skeptical how much medicine actually adds to human health. Most of the improvements in longevity and health come from things like clean water. Patching up someone when their sick is great if you are that person being patched up, but I'm not sure the net effect on society is that great.

Law does some pretty great things: protects people against racial discrimination in the workplace; protects the basic rights of people who are accused of crimes; makes sure contracts are enforced.

Besides vaccines and other basic and essential infection disease control, if America had to live without all our doctors or all our lawyers, I think we'd be much better off getting rid of all our doctors.

But your love for medicine seems genuine and I hope you pursue it.

jdhopeful14
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby jdhopeful14 » Mon May 16, 2011 3:54 am

Wow, with such love for medicine and such disdain for lawyers I hope you stumbled her while looking for top-med-schools.com. I think lawyers--well, law--contributes a great deal to society. I think the rule of law is what makes places like America great. I'm skeptical how much medicine actually adds to human health. Most of the improvements in longevity and health come from things like clean water. Patching up someone when their sick is great if you are that person being patched up, but I'm not sure the net effect on society is that great.

Law does some pretty great things: protects people against racial discrimination in the workplace; protects the basic rights of people who are accused of crimes; makes sure contracts are enforced.

Besides vaccines and other basic and essential infection disease control, if America had to live without all our doctors or all our lawyers, I think we'd be much better off getting rid of all our doctors.

But your love for medicine seems genuine and I hope you pursue it.


Your understanding of law is very simplistic, and your understanding of medicine even more so.

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Rock-N-Roll
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Rock-N-Roll » Mon May 16, 2011 4:04 am

I've seen this theme come up a couple of times since I joined TLS but the trolling (both pro medicine and pro law) is quite heavy in this particular thread.

These are two very different and rather involved fields. I would therefore claim that one can not truly argue the intrinsic virtues of either field without having first been immersed in that field (for a few years at least).

Personally, I can't yet say much about lawyering, but I can testify that much of what is being said in this thread about medicine is at best anecdotal and worst just plain off the mark (and silly).

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Rock-N-Roll
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Rock-N-Roll » Mon May 16, 2011 4:11 am

tinman wrote:I'm skeptical how much medicine actually adds to human health. Most of the improvements in longevity and health come from things like clean water. Patching up someone when their sick is great if you are that person being patched up, but I'm not sure the net effect on society is that great.


Do you seriously believe this? What in the world is it based on?

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ResolutePear
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby ResolutePear » Mon May 16, 2011 4:20 am

Rock-N-Roll wrote:
tinman wrote:I'm skeptical how much medicine actually adds to human health. Most of the improvements in longevity and health come from things like clean water. Patching up someone when their sick is great if you are that person being patched up, but I'm not sure the net effect on society is that great.


Do you seriously believe this? What in the world is it based on?


Yes, because stuff like clean water contributes to something awesome when you get a brain aneurism. Duh. Fuck medicine.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 4:34 am

Anonymous User wrote:
My "definitely not true" statement above was directed towards Renzo's statement. I was trying to agree with you, Doublechecks.

As someone who's background was a better fit for med school than law school, I made the choice to go law school and would make it again, and I am therefore the example of one needed to refute Renzo's statement.

And, along with other posters in this board, I do include MD/PhDs in the group of PhDs who I think deserve more respect. The vast majority of medical research is done by PhDs.

Doctors are just technicians, in my opinion. Maybe most lawyers are too, but at least you are suppose to make creative and convincing arguments when you write. In my opinion, your job as a doctor is to be inherently uncreative--to apply the knowledge generated by researchers.

Maybe being a lawyer will suck, and I'll regret my life choices down the road. So be it. But I'm glad to be in law school know. And I'd make the choice again.

And the only thing better about harvard med over yale law is that it impresses people more in bars, IMO.


My gosh, this post is filled with sheer stupidity. Doctors have to know how anatomy works, basic physics, bodily functions and diseases, diagnosis, as well as have excellent writing skills. Lawyers only need writing skills. You make it seem as if lawyers are above doctors; sure, given the fact that a JD is just another humanities degree and when you work in Biglaw, all you do is pincite and push papers every day, sure beats anything else out there. Even partners get terminated if they don't contribute to the firm's overall profitability.

In the end, lawyers take something away from someone, whether it be money, property, or freedom. Doctors have everything to give. When there is a successful treatment, no one is mad a doctor, and he/she is satisfied with the outcome.

Science and the human body are awesome (and don't act like they aren't), whereas laws are just that; laws, man-made notions that are different in every country, be that in Canada or Saudi Arabia. The human body and science is a universal construct, thereby making it much more interesting than law in general.

There is an extremely high case of depression, job dissatisfaction, alcoholism, and general misery among lawyers. How many lawyers love their work after 20 years? Damn few. Sure Docs are unhappy with the bureaucracy of modern health care, but most still find meaning in their work. Hell, most lawyers can't even stand Biglaw after 2 years, realizing such a Faustian Deal was worse than expected.

And to clarify: a PhD is NOT a professional degree, incapable of providing a practice or service, and is not a license. MD blows it out of the water bar-none.


PhD in a hard science >>> MD in terms of difficulty. Med school is extremely time-consuming, because most of it is just rote memorization. Engineering (well, most types of engineering)/physics/p-chem/etc. (not just physics 1, or chem 1 and o-chem which is pretty much all you need for med school), are more conceptually difficult. (I know people who dropped out of Chem E to go to med school because it was easier.) While it sucks having to deal with exams that count for 100% of the grade or whatever, writing a 600 page dissertation is arguably even worse. (I dropped out of a 70 page thesis in college because I didn't want to do all of the tedious primary source research. You can't use secondary sources and you have to basically come up with your own shit. My dad's EECS dissertation was on the most boring shit imaginable and was 300 pages long.)

I think doctors do have to know more then lawyers, and med school is probably harder than law school because you can't "short-cut" studying like you do in law school, but a lot of practicing doctors don't know jack shit outside of their specialty. Primary care physicians often have to look up treatments because they have forgotten most of what they learned in med school. And frankly, the practice of medicine sounds like it sucks too in terms of QOL (there are similarly long hours in both law and medicine) in certain specialties and primary care. And like someone else mentioned, you can only be a practicing surgeon until you're middle-aged, when your eyesight starts to fail and you develop the shakes. I also can't imagine the pressure of being an anesthesiologist who has to pay a shitload for insurance and face huge liabilities. Moreover, it's unrealistic to be a solo doc due to overhead so you have to work with other docs or for a hospital, so doctors get less freedom.

IMO, if you want to talk about QOL relative to pay, I think both professions lose. I'd argue being a CPA provides better work-life balance, job prospects, and QOL.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Mon May 16, 2011 4:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 4:53 am

Why are certain posters making the claim that med is harder than law, like it's universally true and completely definitive? The only thing that's clear is that med school is, on the whole, more time consuming than law school. I don't think that translates into med school being more conceptually difficult than law school.

Different people will feel differently about the difficulty of law school vs med school. It all depends on how one's mind works - med school is heavy on memorization, while law school is more about reading and analysis. Some people may be good at one and bad at another, and that may affect how they view the difficulty of the disciplines.

Still, I think the whole idea of comparing law vs medicine is ludicrous. The disciplines are just too different.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 4:58 am

Anonymous User wrote:Why are certain posters making the claim that med is harder than law, like it's universally true and completely definitive? The only thing that's clear is that med school is, on the whole, more time consuming than law school. I don't think that translates into med school being more conceptually difficult than law school.


I think people are somewhat confusing the two. But, law school is probably easier in the sense that you can "short cut" your studying in law by using others outlines and stuff like that. I spent far less time studying 2L year than I did 1L year though because I ended reading a fraction of the assigned material. (Admittedly, worse grades....) It's harder to "short-cut" in medicine when you are tested on specifics, although admittedly, a lot of med schools do use the pass/fail system and pretty much never fail people. (So this implies you can half-ass your way through med school, and if you fail to match at residency, you can scramble for some shit residency.)

As for the practice of law and medicine, both professions require long, long hours doing tedious, difficult work. (Makes me wish I were born with a silver spoon in my mouth...ha!)
Last edited by Anonymous User on Mon May 16, 2011 5:06 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby LSHopeful2 » Mon May 16, 2011 5:04 am

Uh, who the fuck would want to get a Phd in materials science, electrical engineering or geology? QFNO. Biglaw associates make 160k (sorry you gotta include horrible schedule and no life)- something even engineering Phds don't make. And a Phd in a hard science is an utter waste of time unless you want to be in academia or become some kind of quant. The coursework is actually less interesting and meaningful than law or medicine because you will almost never intend to use those stupid theories that aren't applicable in the real world or business problems, putting you at a disadvantage even since you're stuck in technics. So Phd, unless you want to teach: worthless, and less money.

Of course, I have to throw my $0.02 here, and that is that the general public has respect for doctors much more than Phds or lawyers. Stop avoiding the issue. Specialists can make even more and it all depends. Phds don't even have their own Phd school, but exist as part and parcel with the undergrad institution as a component. Doctors take care of real business, and diagnose, need to have knowledge, even formulate research. Phds can't do both.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 5:10 am

LSHopeful2 wrote:Uh, who the fuck would want to get a Phd in materials science, electrical engineering or geology? QFNO. Biglaw associates make 160k (sorry you gotta include horrible schedule and no life)- something even engineering Phds don't make. And a Phd in a hard science is an utter waste of time unless you want to be in academia or become some kind of quant. The coursework is actually less interesting and meaningful than law or medicine because you will almost never intend to use those stupid theories that aren't applicable in the real world or business problems, putting you at a disadvantage even since you're stuck in technics. So Phd, unless you want to teach: worthless, and less money.


Weren't we talking about what deserves mores respect? PhDs in the hard sciences deserve much more respect than MDs.

Of course, I have to throw my $0.02 here, and that is that the general public has respect for doctors much more than Phds or lawyers. Stop avoiding the issue. Specialists can make even more and it all depends. Phds don't even have their own Phd school, but exist as part and parcel with the undergrad institution as a component. Doctors take care of real business, and diagnose, need to have knowledge, even formulate research. Phds can't do both.


I don't know about "much more," but I agree it's more. But if that's your reason for going to med school, then good luck to you. And if that's your main reason, you're probably going to hate being a doctor.

Honestly, I'd rather be a good-for-nothing actor/actress nobody really respects with enough money to start my own business, than a doctor simply because lay people would respect me more. Respect is meaningless when your QOL sucks.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Mon May 16, 2011 5:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby LSHopeful2 » Mon May 16, 2011 5:16 am

Are you Fucking kidding me? Not to be rude but ask any person from the street "who do you have more respect for: the Cardiologist who saves lives or the Mechaninical engineering PhD?" This is so self-evident. That's why doctors have coats, licenses, respect, prestige. Phds have none of those!

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 5:16 am

Uh, who the fuck would want to get a Phd in materials science, electrical engineering or geology? QFNO. Biglaw associates make 160k (sorry you gotta include horrible schedule and no life)- something even engineering Phds don't make. And a Phd in a hard science is an utter waste of time unless you want to be in academia or become some kind of quant. The coursework is actually less interesting and meaningful than law or medicine because you will almost never intend to use those stupid theories that aren't applicable in the real world or business problems, putting you at a disadvantage even since you're stuck in technics. So Phd, unless you want to teach: worthless, and less money.

Of course, I have to throw my $0.02 here, and that is that the general public has respect for doctors much more than Phds or lawyers. Stop avoiding the issue. Specialists can make even more and it all depends. Phds don't even have their own Phd school, but exist as part and parcel with the undergrad institution as a component. Doctors take care of real business, and diagnose, need to have knowledge, even formulate research. Phds can't do both.


Maybe people get PhD's in science because they genuinely enjoy what they're doing and are good at it. It sounds cliche as fuck but money ain't everything. What good is it if you hate what you do and are shit at it? And don't talk about $160K/yr as if all law grads make that much.

BTW science/math PhD's can, and do, often segue into finance and make more money there than the average doctor and lawyer combined.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 5:20 am

LSHopeful2 wrote:Are you Fucking kidding me? Not to be rude but ask any person from the street "who do you have more respect for: the Cardiologist who saves lives or the Mechaninical engineering PhD?" This is so self-evident. That's why doctors have coats, licenses, respect, prestige. Phds have none of those!


Were we discussing the perspective of lay people? I was speaking from the point of a view of a person who knows more about PhDs and MDs than the average joe. And I think that a PhD in a hard science requires more innate, intellectual ability, and arguably more time.

And I bet most lay people would not know what a "cardiologist" is.

I also don't understand how the obsession with "lay prestige" got into this discussion. Lay prestige means nothing if you hate your line of work. And frankly, I think most people would agree that money matters more than the prestige of your profession. Most people work primarily to make a living -- I frankly don't believe doctors work primarily because of some selfless interest in helping people -- and if they had the opportunity to quit their job and do something else because of financial freedom, most would (doctors included).
Last edited by Anonymous User on Mon May 16, 2011 5:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 5:25 am

Weren't we talking about what deserves mores respect? PhDs in the hard sciences deserve much more respect than MDs.


Agreed. Doctors diagnose and treat diseases, and save lives, using knowledge derived from the work of research scientists (who are almost always PhD's). I think it's evident who deserves more respect. Though it's obvious that doctors get more of it.

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby LSHopeful2 » Mon May 16, 2011 5:33 am

Yes, and if you want to be spitting out green every moment like a machine and have no meaning behind your role nor respect from the general public and to top it off no license then you work your way up in investment banking to be partner. And all you need is an Mba.

By your reasoning then any hard science Phd'er has more talent than the supreme court justices. Or more artistic ability or natural prowess than even surgeons. Surgery is probably the hardest thing to do on this earth, which is why it requires years of training. Hard science Phds just keep reading material over and over again, trial and error until they get the equation right to figure a new way out. Please.

Ajd if that's the case with doctors, then why don't phds save lives and apply the practice? Doctors have to know the practicality behind it, phds just do the research but doctors still do the research as well. What about lawyers now?

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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 5:41 am

LSHopeful2 wrote:Yes, and if you want to be spitting out green every moment like a machine and have no meaning behind your role nor respect from the general public and to top it off no license then you work your way up in investment banking to be partner. And all you need is an Mba.

By your reasoning then any hard science Phd'er has more talent than the supreme court justices. Or more artistic ability or natural prowess than even surgeons. Surgery is probably the hardest thing to do on this earth, which is why it requires years of training. Hard science Phds just keep reading material over and over again, trial and error until they get the equation right to figure a new way out. Please.

Ajd if that's the case with doctors, then why don't phds save lives and apply the practice? Doctors have to know the practicality behind it, phds just do the research but doctors still do the research as well. What about lawyers now?


Lawyers keep incompetent doctors in check. MDs prescribe the medicine that PhDs create.

"By your [faulty] reasoning" evidenced by your weird inferences, you did poorly on the LSAT. So why are you on a law forum "LSHopeful2"?
Last edited by Anonymous User on Mon May 16, 2011 5:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

Anonymous User
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 5:42 am

LSHopeful2 wrote:Yes, and if you want to be spitting out green every moment like a machine and have no meaning behind your role nor respect from the general public and to top it off no license then you work your way up in investment banking to be partner. And all you need is an Mba.

By your reasoning then any hard science Phd'er has more talent than the supreme court justices. Or more artistic ability or natural prowess than even surgeons. Surgery is probably the hardest thing to do on this earth, which is why it requires years of training. Hard science Phds just keep reading material over and over again, trial and error until they get the equation right to figure a new way out. Please.

Ajd if that's the case with doctors, then why don't phds save lives and apply the practice? Doctors have to know the practicality behind it, phds just do the research but doctors still do the research as well. What about lawyers now?


A doctor is not a jack of all trades. Doctors don't do research, treat people, and all this other shit you say they do at the same time.

Why don't you learn what doctors really do? Here's a good place to start: --LinkRemoved--

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LSHopeful2
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby LSHopeful2 » Mon May 16, 2011 5:47 am

.
Last edited by LSHopeful2 on Thu Sep 01, 2011 10:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273100
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 16, 2011 5:53 am

LSHopeful2 wrote:You guys are obsessed arguing over ridiculous bullshit. Wow, no wonder majority of lawyers are miserable such as yourself. Mind you, I haven't taken the LSAT just yet since I don't intend to sell my soul to biglaw like you will be doing. You still haven't answer my question on why Phds can't treat and diagnose, save lives or apply medical research.

And why so many anon posters? Are you afraid of something? I thought this was to be used only when discussing firm information? Wow, what abusers.


If you can't answer that for yourself......

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ResolutePear
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Re: Medicine vs. Law - prospects?

Postby ResolutePear » Mon May 16, 2011 7:47 am

This topic has went to the lulz. It's obvious the most respected profession are clergy. Jeez.




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